The Market Vectors Junior Gold Miners ETF debuted in 2009. This ETF has become quite popular among investors seeking to have indirect access to gold assets. Although similar to the Gold Miners, the Junior Gold Miners focuses on smaller companies involved in an ongoing search for new sources of gold. Because these companies are less established, there is more risk involved.

There are both advantages and disadvantages to every investment. If you are opposed to holding physical gold, buying shares in a gold mining company may be a safer alternative. If you believe gold could be a safe bet against inflation, investing in coins, bullion, or jewelry are paths that you can take to gold-based prosperity. Lastly, if your primary interest is in using leverage to profit from rising gold prices, the futures market might be your answer, but note that there is a fair amount of risk associated with any leverage-based holdings.


The Gold price fluctuates daily. It moves separately from the stock market and other money markets. Several factors can affect the Gold coin price such as elections, geopolitical volatility, shifts within the stock market and even the threat of a possible recession, just to name a few. All of these factors affect the price of Precious Metals, which is extremely important when buying Gold bullion.


Buying Silver bars is one of the most cost effective, safest and easiest ways to own physical Silver. Silver bars are the bullion of choice for many investors because they cost less over Silver spot price than Silver coins. Additionally, their uniform shape and size mean Silver bars are easy to store, count and transfer. APMEX sells Silver bars produced by Sunshine Mint, PAMP Suisse, RCM, Johnson Matthey and other respected Silver mints. Each Silver bar is stamped with its exact Silver weight, fineness, and a serial number for added security.
For most of history, coins were valued based on the precious metal they contain. Whether a coin was actually made by the party as claimed was of secondary importance compared to whether it contains the correct amount of metal – that is, correct weight and fineness (purity). Genuine appearance was simply a convenient shortcut to avoid time-consuming tests in everyday transactions.
Another factor to take into account when purchasing gold instruments is whether to buy new freshly-minted products or to look for relatively cheaper secondary-market gold goods. Like any other product or commodity, most everyone automatically prefers shiny and new. Moreover, there is a widespread myth among some investors that secondary-market precious metals products have a lower resale value because of their condition and lack of finish. Depending on the sentiment and market condition when the investor is looking to sell, this is not always the case. However, collectors who treasure gold coins for their collectible value will, in most cases, prefer mint condition and near-perfect or perfect graded gold coins.
The official gold bullion coin of the U.S. is the American Gold Eagle. It was first released by the United States Mint in 1986 after being authorized under the Gold Bullion Coin Act of 1985. The design on the obverse in 1986 was Augustus Saint-Gaudens' depiction of Liberty. It is sold in both proof (most should avoid buying proof coins) and bullion finishes with a rendition of Adolph A. Weinman's Walking Liberty design. The weight of the bullion is usually used to describe Gold Eagle coins. They also have a marked face value, such as ten dollars on the ¼ ounce coin.

The second category is dated bullion gold coins minted by sovereign countries. These are guaranteed as to weight and purity by official mints worldwide and have the added advantage of being legal tender. Each sovereign mint produces various size coins – 1 oz being the most popular. They also mint fractional gold bullion coins in 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz and 1/10 oz each year. The fractional sizes are popular with those who believe gold barter coins may be necessary at some future date.


Coins, bullion, and bars. If you're looking to own physical gold for its investment value, then coins, bullion, and bars are the best option. However, there are markups to consider here, as well. It costs money to take raw gold and turn it into a coin, and that's often passed on to the end customer. Also, most coin dealers will add a markup to their prices to compensate them for acting as middlemen. Think of it like a commission for a stock trade; coin dealers have to make a living, too. Perhaps the best option for most investors is to buy gold bullion directly from the U.S. Mint, so you know you are dealing with a reputable dealer.  

Avoid rare coins. Rare coins require more diligence and expertise when buying them, Mladjenovic says. Two coins may look alike but have completely different grades. This difference can add up to thousands of dollars. You should hire a professional grading service and get a certificate of authenticity when buying rare coins — a hassle for most investors.
As the oldest form of money, gold is a precious metal that has been prized by civilizations across the world for thousands of years. Gold coins are a staple in the gold bullion industry. They’re valued for both their gold bullion content as well as their design. Gold coins are very eye-appealing, and sovereign coins serve as legal tender in every nation in which they are produced.

Queen's Beast Silver Coins: The Royal Mint's Queen's Beast Silver Coin program includes 10 designs with each one representing a different heraldic beast from the history of England's royal monarchs. Each design is available as a .9999 pure silver bullion coins or .999 pure silver proof coin with a 2 oz silver weight in the bullion version or 1 oz, 5 oz, 10 oz, and 1 kilo options in proof.


The LBMA "traceable chain of custody" includes refiners as well as vaults. Both have to meet their strict guidelines. Bullion products from these trusted refiners are traded at face value by LBMA members without assay testing. By buying bullion from an LBMA member dealer and storing it in an LBMA recognized vault, customers avoid the need of re-assaying or the inconvenience in time and expense it would cost.[40] However this is not 100% sure, for example, Venezuela moved its gold because of the political risk for them, and as the past shows, even in countries considered as democratic and stable, for example in the USA in the 1930s gold was seized by the government and legal moving was banned.[41]

There are both advantages and disadvantages to every investment. If you are opposed to holding physical gold, buying shares in a gold mining company may be a safer alternative. If you believe gold could be a safe bet against inflation, investing in coins, bullion, or jewelry are paths that you can take to gold-based prosperity. Lastly, if your primary interest is in using leverage to profit from rising gold prices, the futures market might be your answer, but note that there is a fair amount of risk associated with any leverage-based holdings.
That said, bullion coins usually command a premium over the melt value in the actual marketplace. On newly minted bullion coins, the premium charged over market value can be attributed to the relative liquidity and small size of bullion coins compared to bullion as well as the costs involved in manufacturing and distributing them. In secondary trading, however, additional premiums can develop specific to the coins. This is due to the numismatic value rather than the melt value. Numismatic value refers to the higher value that is commanded due to the relative rarity or particular beauty of a specific edition of a bullion coin. Unlike the melt value, discerning the numismatic value is more art than math.

Silver spot prices are extremely important in the buying and selling of precious metals. The spot price of silver refers to the price per troy ounce traded on various Commodity Exchanges; it is updated every second during market hours. The troy ounce has been the standard measurement for precious metals since the 1800s in the US and much longer in other parts of the world. Silver prices, like the prices of other precious metals such as gold, are subject to volatile price swings. The prices of our silver products are determined by the current spot price of silver, in addition to our premiums for each product. The current silver spot price is determined by many factors, including but not limited to the state of the economy, futures market, OTC (Over the Counter) market, world events and strength of other currencies. At Silver.com, our up to the minute spot prices are provided by Xignite.com, a leading provider of market data cloud solutions.
Gold has been used throughout history as money and has been a relative standard for currency equivalents specific to economic regions or countries, until recent times. Many European countries implemented gold standards in the latter part of the 19th century until these were temporarily suspended in the financial crises involving World War I.[3] After World War II, the Bretton Woods system pegged the United States dollar to gold at a rate of US$35 per troy ounce. The system existed until the 1971 Nixon Shock, when the US unilaterally suspended the direct convertibility of the United States dollar to gold and made the transition to a fiat currency system. The last major currency to be divorced from gold was the Swiss Franc in 2000.[4]
This is an obvious simplification of a far more complex history. However, in some ways, it was only natural that early humans would begin using the precious metal as a way to facilitate trade and accumulate and store wealth.  In fact, early paper currencies were generally backed by gold, with every printed bill corresponding to an amount of gold held in a vault somewhere for which it could, technically, be exchanged (this rarely happened). This approach to paper money lasted well into the 20th century. That said, modern currencies are largely fiat currencies, so the link between gold and paper money has long been broken. 
Banks offer us a way of looking after our money, with the promise of a small return every year in the form of interest. Other investments such as equity in a high performing company or a hedge fund offer the potential for enormous returns and can be attractive for those looking to increase their wealth. However, while maximising your wealth is one way to increase your financial security, are these types of asset, for all their potential returns, a safe choice? There are often huge levels of risk involved in these investments and businesses, banks, and other financial institutions are all vulnerable to economic collapse. Even leaving your money in the bank, the lowest risk of these options, can offer very low returns at times and, although they seem stable institutions, are vulnerable to collapse, leaving your hard-earned money in severe danger of being lost entirely.
Derivatives, such as gold forwards, futures and options, currently trade on various exchanges around the world and over-the-counter (OTC) directly in the private market. In the U.S., gold futures are primarily traded on the New York Commodities Exchange (COMEX) and Euronext.liffe. In India, gold futures are traded on the National Commodity and Derivatives Exchange (NCDEX) and Multi Commodity Exchange (MCX).[54]

Gold has been one of the most prized substances known to man since before recorded history. We're lucky today because we have a myriad number of ways to own gold, many of which are just a click or a phone call away here at MCM. From ancient coins through world coins, Classic U.S. Gold and modern gold coins from the U.S. Mint and mints around the world, they're all here for you today.


As far as pricing, gold bars are a cheaper alternative to gold coins which will carry higher premiums depending on the country of their origin. Manufacturers can come from a variety of countries with the most popular being Switzerland, United States, Canada & Australia. Normally gold bars are at least .999 fine and most reputable producers of gold bars will encase them in a certificate card with a matching serial number on the bar as well as the card. These certificates will contain not only the serial number but the weight and purity.
Gold bars come in nearly any size imaginable. The most popular gold bar size is the 1 oz gold bar followed by the kilo gold bar which weighs 32.15 oz. The premium over spot is usually the smallest when ordering bars of larger size such as the kilo gold bar, however a large quantity order of a smaller bar size can also reduce the premium or price per ounce, gram, or kilo paid over the fluctuating gold spot price.
The Krugerrand gold coin was first minted in South Africa in 1967 and was produced by the South African Mint. By 1980, this gold coin accounted for 90 percent of the global coin market. Kruger is the man featured on the obverse and rand refers to the South African unit of currency. Production levels of the Krugerrand have varied over the past half century. They went down in the years associated with the apartheid government and are increasing again.
Many types of gold "accounts" are available. Different accounts impose varying types of intermediation between the client and their gold. One of the most important differences between accounts is whether the gold is held on an allocated (fully reserved) or unallocated (pooled) basis. Unallocated gold accounts are a form of fractional reserve banking and do not guarantee an equal exchange for metal in the event of a run on the issuer's gold on deposit. Another major difference is the strength of the account holder's claim on the gold, in the event that the account administrator faces gold-denominated liabilities (due to a short or naked short position in gold for example), asset forfeiture, or bankruptcy.
The Australian Gold Kangaroo is a beautiful 99.99% pure gold bullion coin minted by the Perth Mint, the government mint of Australia. Each coin ships inside its own plastic holder. The Perth Mint's unbeatable minting experience and its use of advanced manufacturing technology contribute to the coins' reputation of being the highest quality in the more...
Leveraged Investment Scams – Leveraged investments are high-risk investments that can result in the loss of even more money than you originally invested. Typically, in a leveraged investment scam, a telemarketer or website will state that the price of metal is about to skyrocket and that you can make significant profits by making a small down payment for the metal, often as low as 20 percent. According to the marketer, by paying only 20 percent of the purchase price, you can get more metal than if you had to pay 100 percent of the purchase price.
ETF shares can be sold in basically two ways. The investors can sell the individual shares to other investors, or they can sell the Creation Units back to the ETF. In addition, ETFs generally redeem Creation Units by giving investors the securities that comprise the portfolio instead of cash. Because of the limited redeemability of ETF shares, ETFs are not considered to be and may not call themselves mutual funds.[51]
Stockpiling gold has been a favorite investment of the wealthy through much of history, and gold remains the most popular investment of all the precious metals. Gold is fungible, portable, and accorded value everywhere in the world. This article outlines four ways to invest in gold. The most suitable method for you depends on the amount of money you have to invest, your investment objectives, the amount of risk you can absorb, and the length of time you intend to hold on to your gold.
As the collector market for coins grew rapidly in the late 19th century and early 20th century, it became apparent that a more precise grading standard was needed. Some coins were simply more fine than others, and some uncirculated coins showed more luster and far fewer marks than others. Terms like "gem uncirculated" and "very fine" began to see use, as more precise grading descriptions allowed for more precise pricing for the booming collector market. In 1948, a well-known numismatist by the name of Dr. William Sheldon attempted to standardized coin grading by proposing what is now known as the Sheldon Scale.
Gold prices vary each day. Investors may check MoneyMetals.com to see the live global price of precious metals at any given time. As a general matter, the global metals market is open around the clock on Monday through Friday.  You can reference price charts which display both historic and live data in various currencies such as U.S. dollars, euros, British pounds, Australian dollars, Canadian dollars, and others. Live prices can change in just seconds. It is important to check prices in real time before buying or selling bullion.

Coins are another very popular way to invest in silver bullion. Silver coins, like bars, can offer investors a simple and convenient way to invest in the precious metal. There are many different types of silver coins available today produced by various governments throughout the world. Some of the most common bullion coins are the American Silver Eagle, Canadian Silver Maple Leaf, Chinese Silver Panda and British Silver Britannia. Silver bullion coins come in various sizes with the 1oz variation being the most popular. In addition, one can buy tubes or monster boxes of multiple coins for convenience at at reasonable cost over spot price.


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A safe haven protects investors against a possible catastrophe. That's why many investors bought gold during the 2008 financial crisis. Gold prices continued to skyrocket in response to the eurozone crisis. Investors were also concerned about the impact of Obamacare and the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act. The 2011 debt ceiling crisis was another worrying event.
The site, USBullionExchange.com, also has a tab where customers can view past trends in gold, silver, platinum and palladium prices. As far as the products available at US Bullion Exchange, they are always looking to buy and expand their own collection. They retail many of the common gold coinage, American Buffalo and Eagle, Canadian Maple Leaf, British Sovereign and French Franc, among others.

In addition, selling little-known, unusual, or exotic coins may be difficult, or you may have to sell below the market value of the metal. Unless the dealer has an immediate need for the coin you purchased, he may be reluctant to repurchase it from you. In contrast, bullion coins are a fungible commodity for which there is always a ready, liquid, and transparent global market.
Since the price of gold tends to be dramatically cyclical, subject to many factors involving supply and demand, it can be quite difficult to valuate gold in an environment of constantly depreciating paper currencies. One way to valuate gold is to compare it to the price of stocks, which tends to be more stable. The Dow/gold ratio is the Dow Jones Industrial Average relative to gold's price per ounce (or how many ounces of gold the Dow can buy). A high Dow/gold ratio means stocks are overpriced and gold is cheap, while a low Dow/gold ratio means gold is overpriced and stocks are cheap. One should consider buying stocks and selling gold when the Dow/gold ratio falls well below the historic trend-line (which has recently averaged about 20 or higher). Conversely, one might consider selling stocks and buying gold when the Dow/gold ratio is significantly above the historic trend-line.

Purchasing gold for investment purposes has traditionally been a hedge against inflation and weakness in the US dollar. For thousands of years gold has been a store of wealth and value which continues today. Owning physical precious metals is a strategy of the very wealthy for centuries and although precious metals don't necessarily need to be your only investment, it may be wise to make them a part of your strategy moving forward.


Gold bars are measured in troy ounces. The minimum purity required for producing a gold bar is 99.5 percent. They are stored in bullion vaults to maintain the status of Good Delivery bars. This also helps to ensure a maximum resale value. Gold bars for sale are commonly available in 1,000 kilograms and 32,150.765 troy ounces. Other weights include the kilo (32.15074656 troy ounces), 10 oz, 1 oz, 50 grams, and 117 grams.

Check out the company by entering its name in a search engine online. Read whether other people have something to say about their experiences with the company. Try to communicate offline if possible to clarify any details. In addition, contact your state Attorney General and local consumer protection agency. Checking with these organizations in the communities where promoters are located is a good idea, but realize that it isn't fool-proof: it just may be too soon for someone to realize they've been defrauded or to have lodged a complaint with the authorities.

These particular buyers are looking to create a hefty fund to hedge inflation. When seeking to establish a substantial fund, bars become an extremely attractive option, as they are the easiest to stack and store. They come in weights as high as 100 troy ounces, making storage relatively easier when compared to other instruments such as rounds and coins. However, providing adequate safety and security to this massive quantity of silver can be a tedious task. Hence, private, offshore storage depositories, offering top-of-the-line security at reasonable prices, are considered a great option for storage.
Investors may choose to leverage their position by borrowing money against their existing assets and then purchasing or selling gold on account with the loaned funds. Leverage is also an integral part of trading gold derivatives and unhedged gold mining company shares (see gold mining companies). Leverage or derivatives may increase investment gains but also increases the corresponding risk of capital loss if the trend reverses.
That said, bullion coins usually command a premium over the melt value in the actual marketplace. On newly minted bullion coins, the premium charged over market value can be attributed to the relative liquidity and small size of bullion coins compared to bullion as well as the costs involved in manufacturing and distributing them. In secondary trading, however, additional premiums can develop specific to the coins. This is due to the numismatic value rather than the melt value. Numismatic value refers to the higher value that is commanded due to the relative rarity or particular beauty of a specific edition of a bullion coin. Unlike the melt value, discerning the numismatic value is more art than math.
Many coin and small bar dealers offer 'free' shipping when you buy online, but in reality that cost has been shifted into the price you pay for the coin or bar, along with the cost of its manufacture and the dealer's profit margin. In total, it is not unusual for all of these costs to result in you paying 5-8% over the actual wholesale price of the gold you buy.
As of 2009 holders of COMEX gold futures have experienced problems taking delivery of their metal. Along with chronic delivery delays, some investors have received delivery of bars not matching their contract in serial number and weight. The delays cannot be easily explained by slow warehouse movements, as the daily reports of these movements show little activity. Because of these problems, there are concerns that COMEX may not have the gold inventory to back its existing warehouse receipts.[55]
Mainly a part of the discussion when we talk about any silver bullion instrument – premium over spot refers to how much more a product is worth (premium charged) over the melt value of silver present in the silver bullion coin, round, or bar. Just as a whole is more than the sum of its parts, the value of some bullion products is higher than their intrinsic worth, depending on the minting source, age, and rarity.

The value of numismatic coins is determined by features such as condition, age, rarity and the number of coins originally minted. An example of a coveted collector's coin is the Spur Royal. The grade of the coin also matters, which is a numerical score assigned based on a visual evaluation of the amount of wear. Basic grades are good, fine, and un-circulated. The Universal rarity scale and the Sheldon rarity scale are the scales used to determine how rare a coin might be.
As with any commodity worthy of investment, there has been a lot of change to Gold prices in the last 5 years. Periods of strength in the U.S. economy have led to lower prices from time to time. Comparatively, periods of volatility in the stock market and other sectors have given power to the price of Gold. When investing in Gold, it is essential to watch the market trends closely, going at least 5 years back to research. This will give a broader picture of what to expect, and give you the chance to determine whether you are buying on an upward climb or a downward slide. All investors must keep in mind that Gold prices will change many times over the course of a 5 year period, but doing the research enables wise investing. Even during weeks or months when Gold prices have experienced a rise, watching the trend will help you decide whether to hold onto your Precious Metals or sell them.
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