Avoid rare coins. Rare coins require more diligence and expertise when buying them, Mladjenovic says. Two coins may look alike but have completely different grades. This difference can add up to thousands of dollars. You should hire a professional grading service and get a certificate of authenticity when buying rare coins — a hassle for most investors.
If you are looking to buy gold in the United States, you have numerous choices when it comes to where you purchase your gold. Local coin and bullion shops and online gold and silver dealers represent the two primary types of retailers at which you can buy gold, silver and other metals products. There are, however, some key differences between the two.
Many Canadian Gold coins are struck in .9999 fine Gold, but the Royal Canadian Mint has a special selection of Gold coins struck in .99999 fine Gold. Many of these coins depict the iconic maple leaf, wildlife animals and predators, and stunning natural elements found in Canada. .99999 fine Gold is a worthy investment for any investor because these coins are extremely rare.
Whether you’re buying coins as an investment or to denominate your wealth in physical form, gold coins are a great value. Our selection of gold coins ranges in weights from 1/20 ounce to 1-ounce gold coins and everything in between, making gold an attractive investment option for investors of all levels. We carry classic gold coins from the US Mint like the American Gold Buffalo and the American Gold Eagle coins, in all weights and sizes, as well as coins from international sovereign mints like the Gold Maple Leaf coins from the Royal Canadian Mint and the Krugerrands from the South African Mint.
The Perth Mint and quality production are nearly synonymous. That is evident with their Lunar coins series and Kangaroo Gold coins. Both are popular with investors not only for their quality strike, but also for their fine Gold content. Kangaroos and Lunar coins have coin value to them, diversifying any investment portfolio. Multiple sizes are available for these coins, providing quality options for investors.
If you are interested in becoming a silver investor, there are a couple of good reasons why buying silver coins might be a great option to consider. For example, silver coins are real money. They aren't paper or digital currency that has nothing to back them. It's a hard currency that has historically been valued for providing a form of money that can be used for all types of products and trade. Additionally, this type of money offers a tangible asset that is often preferred over paper or digital forms of money.
For people who want to ‘play the market,’ i.e. buy and sell regularly to earn immediate profits on every transaction, it is essential to invest in products that can be moved quickly. Even though this is a well-known strategy, timing the market is harder than it seems. For investors who want to buy and sell at a moment’s notice, portability plays an important role in their product choices. However, a healthy risk appetite is required for playing the market. These investors mostly prefer smaller, more portable gold investment vehicles such as coins and rounds.
Traditionally (up to about the 1930s), gold coins have been circulation coins, including coin-like bracteates and dinars. Since recent decades, however, gold coins are mainly produced as bullion coins to investors and as commemorative coins to collectors. While modern gold coins are also legal tender, they are not observed in everyday financial transactions, as the metal value normally exceeds the nominal value. For example, the American Gold Eagle, given a denomination of 50 USD, has a metal value of more than $1,200 USD.
The idea that gold preserves wealth is even more important in an economic environment where investors are faced with a declining U.S. dollar and rising inflation. Historically, gold has served as a hedge against both of these scenarios. With rising inflation, gold typically appreciates. When investors realize that their money is losing value, they will start positioning their investments in a hard asset that has traditionally maintained its value. The 1970s present a prime example of rising gold prices in the midst of rising inflation.
A. A solid, professional gold firm can go a long way in helping the investor shortcut the learning curve. A good gold firm can help you avoid some the problems and pitfalls encountered along the way, and provide some direction. It can help you in the beginning and through the course of your gold ownership both in making additions to your portfolio and liquidations. A solid companion piece to the interview you are now reading is How to Choose a Gold Firm offered on this website. It offers clear guidelines for newcomers and is well-worth the five or ten minutes it takes to read it.
Gold can be a profitable investment when all others fail. If you are concerned about inflation or the devaluation of your country’s currency, you may want to add gold to your portfolio. That said, understand the specific gold investment you’re considering thoroughly before you actually invest. For example, exactly how much will it cost you to store and insure physical gold? What are the tax differences for your income tax bracket between investing in a gold ETF or a gold mining ETF? Knowing the details can make a big difference when it comes to profitability.

Another option for investors is to buy a streaming and royalty company like Franco-Nevada Corp., Royal Gold Corp., or Wheaton Precious Metals. These companies provide cash up front to miners for the right to buy gold and silver in the future at contractually pre-set, reduced prices. Miners use the cash to do things like build new mines or expand existing facilities.

Given the fact that gold no longer backs the U.S. dollar (or other worldwide currencies for that matter), why is it still important today? The simple answer is that while gold is no longer in the forefront of everyday transactions, it is still important to the global economy. To validate this point, there is no need to look further than the balance sheets of central banks and other financial organizations, such as the International Monetary Fund. Presently, these organizations are responsible for holding approximately one-fifth of the world's supply of above-ground gold. In addition, several central banks have added to their present gold reserves, reflecting concerns about the long-term global economy.
Purchasing gold for investment purposes has traditionally been a hedge against inflation and weakness in the US dollar. For thousands of years gold has been a store of wealth and value which continues today. Owning physical precious metals is a strategy of the very wealthy for centuries and although precious metals don't necessarily need to be your only investment, it may be wise to make them a part of your strategy moving forward.
If you buy gold for the right reason – as a long-term savings vehicle – then you want to buy the best-known bullion products for the lowest possible prices. Fortunately, the best-known products are usually the best-priced options. They are relatively common and their value is determined by their weight, not erstwhile values like rareness or collectibility.
Gold jewelry: The problem with buying gold jewelry as an investment is that you pay a premium for the craftsmanship and the desirability of the design. Any piece of jewelry marked 14 karat or less will be below investment quality, and any resale for the sake of investing will be impacted by the need to refine the gold. On the other hand, it is possible to pick up antique or vintage gold for very little at estate sales and similar auctions where a seller may not recognize the true value of the metal content or if people simply aren't in the mood to bid much for it. Older pieces can carry more value due to their unique craftsmanship, so this can be a lucrative and enjoyable way to collect gold.
Investors should be wary of dealers who encourage them to purchase pre 1933 us gold coins that are priced well above their actual melt value.  Many of these coins are not the least bit rare, even if they have a spiffy plastic case with a grade and a hologram on it. Unless you have money to blow, do not pay more than a few percent over the melt value of a coin unless you are highly knowledgeable about rare coins.  Collecting coins can be a fun hobby, but the field is filled with rip-off artists and inflated prices.

After that, investors are often attracted to gold miners like industry giants Barrick Gold (NYSE:ABX), Goldcorp, and Newmont Mining. The shares of gold miners usually track the price of the metal and they can invest in their assets to increase production over time. The shares of miners, however, come with additional risks. For example, many miners are focused on gold, but that's not the only metal they produce. Barrick gets around 90% of its revenue from gold; the rest comes from copper and other sources -- it's not exactly a pure play. 
A. The same vetting rules outlined earlier apply. Check them out. Too often investors make the mistake of believing that the gold firm that sponsors their favorite political commentator is also the best place to make their gold purchases. National media campaigns are expensive and those costs are usually covered in the prices paid by investors for their gold and silver coins. In some instances that mark-up can be twice the underlying metal value. Take care that you are not paying too much for your gold and that you are buying the gold items best suited to meeting your goals.
The most obvious answer is to run out and buy some gold coins, bars, or jewelry. This isn't the best option for investors. For example, there's a huge markup on jewelry, which makes it a very bad investment choice. But there's also likely to be a markup on coins and bars that gets put into the price quoted from dealers. After all, they have to make a living and be compensated for acting as the intermediary between buyers and sellers.
Purchase gold coins online as well as silver coins with Golden Eagle. We offer gold coins & gold bars with competitive prices. It is simple to buy gold with Golden Eagle Coins. We specialize in a wide variety of gold bullion coins and other gold bullion products. Our large inventory caters to both the gold bullion investor as well as the collector.
Silver coins are sold at a premium above Silver spot prices because of their unique designs and limited availability. Coins are usually sold in brilliant uncirculated condition, having not been used as actual currency. Once a coin loses its luster, it begins to lose its status in terms of condition. The highest quality Silver bullion coins are known as proof coins. Popular for their intricate designs, proof coins are struck more than once, which leads to their brilliant shine.

A flat bar struck using .999+ (usually) pure gold is known as a gold bullion bar. Ranging from 1 troy ounce to even 32 troy ounces, gold bars are available in various sizes. However, 1 gram, 1 oz, 100 gram and kilo size remain the most common weights available in the bullion market. Their popularity stems from the fact that they are worth very close to their gold melt values – making them a solid investment choice.  


Gold coins then had a very long period as a primary form of money, only falling into disuse in the early 20th century. Most of the world stopped making gold coins as currency by 1933, as countries switched from the gold standard due to hoarding during the worldwide economic crisis of the Great Depression. In the United States, 1933's Executive Order 6102 forbade the hoarding of gold and was followed by a devaluation of the dollar relative to gold, although the United States did not completely uncouple the dollar from the value of gold until 1971.[citation needed]
But if you don't actually make use of them, these bars can be costly to liquidate once removed from storage. You may encounter assay, refining, or just handling fees in trying to liquidate that size gold bullion bar. It's much more difficult and time-consuming to liquidate gold bullion in a single chunk that is worth over $100,000 than it is to sell the same amount of gold bullion in more convenient and tradable sizes.
And then there are operational issues, since mining is expensive, time-consuming, and often dangerous. A problem at a mine, a major exploration success, or any number of other operational issues can cause a miner's stock performance to diverge materially from the price of gold. Small miners, meanwhile, often provide the most upside opportunity and downside risk, since tiny moves in the price of gold can sometimes be the difference between these miners making a profit or losing money. And then there are companies like Northern Dynasty Minerals, where the only asset is a mine under development. The stock is cheap today, making it something of an option on the price of gold since the value of the mine (called the Pebble Project) won't be realized for years. But if the Pebble Project gets built, Northern Dynasty could see material stock-price gains.
White says that American Eagle Bullion coins, one of the most popular coins for investing in gold, first make their way into the market when they are sold to the Mint’s “authorized purchasers.” (See the list below of the authorized purchasers and their prices, terms and conditions. If you’re new to buying gold, they are a great place to start.) Gold coins are also sold in commemorative editions directly to the public, but these are more expensive. The Mint marks up the price of the coins to cover the value of the gold and the actual minting, as well as shipping and other costs, White says. Dealers say that markup is about 3%. Then the authorized purchasers -- some of whom sell directly to the public and all of whom sell to other dealers -- add their own markup, as do the dealers who buy the coins.
Find a source that sells gold bullion. Often dealers, brokerage houses and banks will sell both coins and bars. When assessing a dealer, see how long they've been in business, whether they're certified with an industry or government body and in what investment activities they specialize. In the United States the national mint provides a list of authorized sellers that you can check. [2]
But if you don't actually make use of them, these bars can be costly to liquidate once removed from storage. You may encounter assay, refining, or just handling fees in trying to liquidate that size gold bullion bar. It's much more difficult and time-consuming to liquidate gold bullion in a single chunk that is worth over $100,000 than it is to sell the same amount of gold bullion in more convenient and tradable sizes.
In 1967, the Gold Krugerrand was struck in South Africa. It was the first modern gold bullion coin struck anywhere, and in the following years countries like Canada and China followed the Krugerrand with their own bullion gold coins, the Gold Maple Leaf and the Gold Panda. Although a latecomer, the American Gold Eagle joined the others in 1986 and quickly became the most popular gold coin in the world.

The Government of the Dominion of Canada issues the Canadian Gold Maple Leaf annually, which is produced by the Royal Canadian Mint. As legal tender, the face value is 50 Canadian dollars. The content is 24 karat with a fineness of .9999. The standard Candaian coin weighs 1 troy ounce. Denominations include 1 gram (50 cents), 1/20 oz ($1), 1/10 oz ($5), ¼ ounce ($10) and ½ oz ($20). The obverse features a profile of Queen Elizabeth II of Canada with the Canadian maple leaf on the reverse. As of 2015, the coin also has security features.

This is a big issue: If someone wants another ounce of gold, they have to dig it up. And aside from hiding gold, there's no realistic way to make it disappear. Meanwhile, no one will be making any more of it (as Medieval alchemists proved long ago), leaving technological advances and price increases as the only ways to increase the economically viable reserve of gold. Although it is the balance between supply and demand that results in a price for gold, the physical nature of it is what provides its intrinsic value. By contrast, if the U.S. government wants another dollar, it just prints one.
It probably doesn't come as a surprise to hear that gold is the most popular among precious metals investing. Often, investors will go into gold in an effort to diversify their portfolio and mitigate potential damage in economic recessions. Still, like every other market in the world, the gold market can fluctuate drastically. This doesn't stop people from investing in the precious metal, securing it for use in the future. Despite world governments abandoning the gold standard and moving to flat currency, the yellow metal has never fully gone out of style. It carries value all over the world, across border both cultural and physical.

A. Gold owners are a group of people I have come to know very well in my 40+ years in the business. Contrary to the less than flattering picture sometimes painted by the mainstream press, the people we have helped become gold owners are among those we rely upon most in our daily lives -- our physicians and dentists, nurses and teachers, plumbers, carpenters and building contractors, business owners, attorneys, engineers and university professors (to name a few.) In other words, gold ownership is pretty much a Main Street endeavor. A recent Gallup poll found that 34% of American investors rated gold the best investment "regardless of gender, age, income or party ID. . ." In that survey, gold was rated higher than stocks, bonds, real estate and bank savings.
The performance of gold bullion is often compared to stocks as different investment vehicles. Gold is regarded by some as a store of value (without growth) whereas stocks are regarded as a return on value (i.e., growth from anticipated real price increase plus dividends). Stocks and bonds perform best in a stable political climate with strong property rights and little turmoil. The attached graph shows the value of Dow Jones Industrial Average divided by the price of an ounce of gold. Since 1800, stocks have consistently gained value in comparison to gold in part because of the stability of the American political system.[56] This appreciation has been cyclical with long periods of stock outperformance followed by long periods of gold outperformance. The Dow Industrials bottomed out a ratio of 1:1 with gold during 1980 (the end of the 1970s bear market) and proceeded to post gains throughout the 1980s and 1990s.[57] The gold price peak of 1980 also coincided with the Soviet Union's invasion of Afghanistan and the threat of the global expansion of communism. The ratio peaked on January 14, 2000 a value of 41.3 and has fallen sharply since.
Karat weight (K or kt) is a traditional fraction-based system used to denote the fineness of gold, with one karat being equal to 1/24 part of pure gold in an alloy. With the precision of modern assaying techniques, however, the fineness of gold ingots and bullion is more likely to appear as a decimal measurement. In this system, pure gold would be denoted as 1.000 fine. However, since absolutely pure gold is very soft and therefore not suitable for coinage or ingots, it is generally accepted worldwide that anything above .999 fine qualifies as 24K. Below is a karat weight to fineness conversion chart.

Check out the company by entering its name in a search engine online. Read whether other people have something to say about their experiences with the company. Try to communicate offline if possible to clarify any details. In addition, contact your state Attorney General and local consumer protection agency. Checking with these organizations in the communities where promoters are located is a good idea, but realize that it isn't fool-proof: it just may be too soon for someone to realize they've been defrauded or to have lodged a complaint with the authorities.


A. Gold owners are a group of people I have come to know very well in my 40+ years in the business. Contrary to the less than flattering picture sometimes painted by the mainstream press, the people we have helped become gold owners are among those we rely upon most in our daily lives -- our physicians and dentists, nurses and teachers, plumbers, carpenters and building contractors, business owners, attorneys, engineers and university professors (to name a few.) In other words, gold ownership is pretty much a Main Street endeavor. A recent Gallup poll found that 34% of American investors rated gold the best investment "regardless of gender, age, income or party ID. . ." In that survey, gold was rated higher than stocks, bonds, real estate and bank savings.
If you’re looking for a real deal on silver, consider purchasing bulk volumes of former US circulation coin designs. Until 1964, the United States issued all of its circulation silver coins with a 90% silver content. This includes items such as the Barber Coinage (1892-1916), the Mercury Dime (1916-1945), and the Walking Liberty Half Dollar (1916-1947). These coins are often available in bulk linen sacks and showcase signs of wear and tear as they were previously in circulation. No matter the condition of the designs, the coins still contain 90% silver content and are an affordable option for first-time investors in particular.
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