Practically speaking, however, a buy-and-hold passive investing strategy may be best for the ordinary gold investor. Since economies tend to be cyclical, buy when the price of gold is down, whether or not your country is currently going through turmoil or you think it’s headed for some. In this way, you don’t have to worry about buying when everyone else is buying and driving the price up.
When you purchase Precious Metals, you are buying an asset valued since ancient times. Recognized viscerally by humans, Gold always has been and always will be a viable investment and commodity. But why? What makes Gold a good investment now? Why is buying physical Gold a good idea today? Let’s examine what makes buying physical Gold an excellent investment and collecting opportunity.
The United States Mint, like other world mints, does not sell its bullion coins directly to the public. Instead, we distribute our coins through a network of official distributors called “authorized purchasers” who, in turn, create a two-way market buying and selling to precious metals wholesalers, private investors, and local bullion coin dealers.
If you store your gold at home, invest in a decent safe. Practice good "safe hygiene." Bolt it to the floor out of sight of windows. Don't leave the combination on a Post-It note on the side of the safe. A reasonably large, fire-resistant safe will cost less than an ounce of gold (at recent prices) and can also be used to store important documents.
We should not trust the fiat currency and highly consider bartering abroad. Boycotting goods is the only sensible way to restore power to the people and end monopolies. Communities should produce their own food supply, self-police and educate as they see fit. There isn't any product or material that we absolutely have to have that isn't within local reach. It is a shame to see the level of consumerism and government dependence overcome the desire for knowledge and skilled labor.
Bullion coins sell for a premium over the market price of the metal on the commodities exchanges.[9] Reasons include their comparative small size and the costs associated with manufacture, storage and distribution. The amount of the premium varies depending on the coin's type and weight and the precious metal. The premium also is affected by prevailing demand.
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