Gold bars can refer to a multitude of different things. Also called ingots or bullion, a gold bar in the most simple terms is gold of certain purity that has been formed into the shape of a rectangular cube. However, there are a lot more terms that can be applied to better describe a gold bar. For instance, if a gold bar is minted, that means it went through a more rigorous creation process. It involves a bank or refinery cutting the gold into set dimensions. In this way, minted gold bars should all be precise in regards to dimensions and purity. A cast bar is easier to make. It merely involves pouring the melted gold into a mold and then letting it form and harden into a bar form. Since these bars aren't cut to specific dimensions, cast bars may be unevenly shaped and vary slightly in appearance from bar to bar. It's often common for cast bars to be handled differently than minted bars. A mint bar will frequently be sealed in a protective packaging whereas a cast bar is more likely to be handled directly.
Our customer service has been and will always be a priority. Should you have a question about prospective orders, orders in process, or completed orders, simply contact our phone support, live chat support, or email support for a prompt response. We are always willing and able to assist you with an existing order or to answer any questions that you may have.

Gold certificates allow gold investors to avoid the risks and costs associated with the transfer and storage of physical bullion (such as theft, large bid-offer spread, and metallurgical assay costs) by taking on a different set of risks and costs associated with the certificate itself (such as commissions, storage fees, and various types of credit risk).
You also have to consider what you will do with the gold you buy in this scenario, which could mean buying a safe or paying for a bank safe deposit box. It's a perfectly fine way to own gold, if that's your goal, but it isn't the best way to invest in gold. And to fully benefit from the portfolio diversification gold offers, you'll need to rebalance your portfolio every so often as you take advantage of investors rushing to gold because it is viewed as a safe haven. 
Investing in gold coins from exotic, unknown mints can be a risky choice. Grading, purity, and other factors determine the value of gold coins – but investors must take great care when sinking money into the illiquid and opaque collectible market. Coins that are supposedly worth way more than their actual melt value should be avoided by everyone but experienced collectors.
Shop for gold bars, gold coins and gold bullion from top refiners and world mints, including the United States Mint, Royal Canadian Mint, Perth Mint, PAMP Suisse, Credit Suisse and more. Buying gold bars and gold coins can help to hedge your financial portfolio against inflation and help to protect your assets from a Stock Market crash. Read more about gold coins, gold bullion and gold bars here
Another popular means of adding numismatic value to silver bullion coins is the application of a colorized lacquer. This too is typically applied only to the primary design of a coin on one side. For example, Colorized American Silver Eagle Coins feature brilliant hues and the red, white, and blue of the American flag on the image of Walking Liberty. The colorized lacquer does not change the weight of the coin, nor does it impact the silver content in any way. It is simply a means of adding a collectible twist to popular silver bullion coins.
As with any commodity worthy of investment, there has been a lot of change to Gold prices in the last 5 years. Periods of strength in the U.S. economy have led to lower prices from time to time. Comparatively, periods of volatility in the stock market and other sectors have given power to the price of Gold. When investing in Gold, it is essential to watch the market trends closely, going at least 5 years back to research. This will give a broader picture of what to expect, and give you the chance to determine whether you are buying on an upward climb or a downward slide. All investors must keep in mind that Gold prices will change many times over the course of a 5 year period, but doing the research enables wise investing. Even during weeks or months when Gold prices have experienced a rise, watching the trend will help you decide whether to hold onto your Precious Metals or sell them.
A small number of modern gold coins are also legal tender. They are not used in typical financial transactions as the value of the gold usually exceeds the nominal value of the coin. Modern investors recognize the timeless value of gold as a prime part of a diversified investment portfolio. And when investors are new to gold, the most popular size they purchase tends to be 1 oz gold coins. 
Not all silver products are IRA eligible for inclusion in precious metal retirement accounts. Please look for the ✔IRA APPROVED checkmark on the product page for the product that you are interested in purchasing. If the checkmark is not present on the page, that product is not eligible for inclusion in precious metal retirement accounts. If you have any questions regarding setting up or buying silver for your account please contact our staff at 1-800-294-8732.
Gold maintains a special position in the market with many tax regimes. For example, in the European Union the trading of recognised gold coins and bullion products are free of VAT. Silver and other precious metals or commodities do not have the same allowance. Other taxes such as capital gains tax may also apply for individuals depending on their tax residency. U.S. citizens may be taxed on their gold profits at collectibles or capital gains rates, depending on the investment vehicle used.[61]
First minted in 1967, the Krugerrand is a South African coin. The South African Mint produced it to help market gold from South Africa. It was also used as a form of legal tender and as gold bullion. By 1980, it accounted for 90 percent of the gold coin market around the world. Paul Kruger, the President of the South African Republic from 1883 to 1900, is featured on the obverse. The South African unit of currency, or “rand,” is shown on the reverse of the coin.
The site, USBullionExchange.com, also has a tab where customers can view past trends in gold, silver, platinum and palladium prices. As far as the products available at US Bullion Exchange, they are always looking to buy and expand their own collection. They retail many of the common gold coinage, American Buffalo and Eagle, Canadian Maple Leaf, British Sovereign and French Franc, among others.
Investment Grade Coins are higher quality and more rare than bullion coins. These coins are also graded and are enclosed in a protective slab to ensure and preserve the condition of the coin. A study commissioned by the U.S. Congress has proven that certain Investment Grade Coins are shown to have an annual return of 15%. Investment Grade Coins are for investors planning to hold onto their investment for at least 3 years.
Further, the confiscation sales pitch is usually based on a very broad definition of “rare and unusual coins.” “They’ll say anything minted pre-1933 has numismatic value,” says Michael Freedman, president of Euro Pacific Precious Metals. In fact, Freedman says, “there were millions and millions of gold coins minted in the 1800s and early 1900s that were simply coin of the realm. They have no numismatic value.”
Gold has been one of the most prized substances known to man since before recorded history. We're lucky today because we have a myriad number of ways to own gold, many of which are just a click or a phone call away here at MCM. From ancient coins through world coins, Classic U.S. Gold and modern gold coins from the U.S. Mint and mints around the world, they're all here for you today.

As you would have probably figured out by now, all forms of gold bullion products have their purpose in an investment portfolio. Hence, a safe and recommended strategy is to allocate a specific ratio (depending on you or the advice of your investment advisor) of every type of gold bullion instrument in your tangible assets. However, it is an entirely personal decision that one must take after careful deliberation.

A flat bar struck using .999+ (usually) pure gold is known as a gold bullion bar. Ranging from 1 troy ounce to even 32 troy ounces, gold bars are available in various sizes. However, 1 gram, 1 oz, 100 gram and kilo size remain the most common weights available in the bullion market. Their popularity stems from the fact that they are worth very close to their gold melt values – making them a solid investment choice.  


While it is next to impossible to buy Silver at spot, reputable retailers such as APMEX make it easy to get the best price available at a competitive premium over spot. The term spot refers to the current market price for a 1 oz unit of Gold, a rate that continually fluctuates during the day. Investors want to pay as close to the current spot price as possible with small premiums giving the best chance at a good margin when selling later. There are, however, other factors that make a higher premium worth paying, such as a history of appreciation, availability, or reputation of quality from the mint of origin. While all Precious Metals including Gold are sold at a premium, this small additional cost is what pays for expenses such as mining, refining, production, and collectible market value.

Gold bars can refer to a multitude of different things. Also called ingots or bullion, a gold bar in the most simple terms is gold of certain purity that has been formed into the shape of a rectangular cube. However, there are a lot more terms that can be applied to better describe a gold bar. For instance, if a gold bar is minted, that means it went through a more rigorous creation process. It involves a bank or refinery cutting the gold into set dimensions. In this way, minted gold bars should all be precise in regards to dimensions and purity. A cast bar is easier to make. It merely involves pouring the melted gold into a mold and then letting it form and harden into a bar form. Since these bars aren't cut to specific dimensions, cast bars may be unevenly shaped and vary slightly in appearance from bar to bar. It's often common for cast bars to be handled differently than minted bars. A mint bar will frequently be sealed in a protective packaging whereas a cast bar is more likely to be handled directly.


Gold has been used throughout history as money and has been a relative standard for currency equivalents specific to economic regions or countries, until recent times. Many European countries implemented gold standards in the latter part of the 19th century until these were temporarily suspended in the financial crises involving World War I.[3] After World War II, the Bretton Woods system pegged the United States dollar to gold at a rate of US$35 per troy ounce. The system existed until the 1971 Nixon Shock, when the US unilaterally suspended the direct convertibility of the United States dollar to gold and made the transition to a fiat currency system. The last major currency to be divorced from gold was the Swiss Franc in 2000.[4]
It is generally accepted that the price of gold is closely related to interest rates. As interest rates rise, the general tendency is for the gold price, which earns no interest, to fall, and vice versa. As a result, the gold price can be closely correlated to central banks[clarification needed] via their monetary policy decisions on interest rates. For example, if market signals indicate the possibility of prolonged inflation, central banks may decide to raise interest rates, which could reduce the price of gold. But this does not always happen: after the European Central Bank raised its interest rate slightly on April 7, 2011, for the first time since 2008,[25] the price of gold drove higher, and hit a new high one day later.[26] Similarly, in August 2011 when interest rates in India were at their highest in two years, the gold prices peaked as well.[27]
Exchange-traded funds, or ETFs, are investment companies that are legally classified as open-end companies or unit investment trusts (UITs), but that differ from traditional open-end companies and UITs.[51] The main differences are that ETFs do not sell directly to investors and they issue their shares in what are called "Creation Units" (large blocks such as blocks of 50,000 shares). Also, the Creation Units may not be purchased with cash but a basket of securities that mirrors the ETF's portfolio. Usually, the Creation Units are split up and re-sold on a secondary market.
You also have to consider what you will do with the gold you buy in this scenario, which could mean buying a safe or paying for a bank safe deposit box. It's a perfectly fine way to own gold, if that's your goal, but it isn't the best way to invest in gold. And to fully benefit from the portfolio diversification gold offers, you'll need to rebalance your portfolio every so often as you take advantage of investors rushing to gold because it is viewed as a safe haven. 
But if you don't actually make use of them, these bars can be costly to liquidate once removed from storage. You may encounter assay, refining, or just handling fees in trying to liquidate that size gold bullion bar. It's much more difficult and time-consuming to liquidate gold bullion in a single chunk that is worth over $100,000 than it is to sell the same amount of gold bullion in more convenient and tradable sizes.

Native American Silver Dollar Coins: An ideal example of special-issue silver coins, the Native American Silver Dollar Coins are proof silver coins issued by the Native American Mint. The coins have a face value of One Dollar, and though they are not legal tender in the United States, the face value is backed by the issuing tribe. Each new design represents an indigenous tribe from North America with an obverse design of the tribe and a reverse design of an animal species special to that tribe's history.
×