The exquisite 2018 Texas Gold Round pays homage to the iconic symbols of Texas and one of the most hallowed landmarks in the Lone Star State — the Texas State Capitol. The towering Capitol building proudly dominates the reverse of the Texas Gold Round, rising up on the face of the round echoing the splendor of the building’s architecture. The more...
Bullion coins can be defined as high-grade precious metals coins suitable for investment purposes. Bullion coins are predominantly issued by a government agency, however, there are some cases where coins are produced by private institutions. That said, in almost all cases, the coin is almost completely made of a precious metal (90% purity and above), it has the amount of that metal stamped on the coin based on a standard metric, and it is also stamped by the agency that created the coin. So, for example, a Gold Eagle is crafted by the U.S. mint, authorized by the U.S. government, and has both the weight (1 troy ounce) and the purity, in some cases, included on its surface (see the Gold Buffalo issued by the U.S. mint).

Exchange-traded funds. If you don't particularly care about holding the gold you own but want direct exposure to the physical metal, then an exchange-traded fund like SPDR Gold Shares is probably the way to go. This fund directly purchases gold on behalf of its shareholders. You'll likely have to pay a commission to trade an ETF, and there will be a management fee (SPDR Gold Share's expense ratio is 0.40%), but you'll benefit from a liquid investment that invests directly in gold coins, bullion, and bars. That said, not all gold-related ETFs invest directly in gold, as I'll discuss below. 

Futures contracts. Futures contracts are another way to own gold without directly taking possession of it, but it's a highly leveraged and risky choice that is inappropriate for beginners. Even experienced investors should think twice here. Essentially, a futures contract is an agreement between a buyer and a seller to exchange a specified amount of gold at a specified future date and at a specified price. As gold prices move up and down, the value of the contract fluctuates, with the accounts of the seller and buyer adjusted accordingly. Futures contracts are generally standardized and traded on exchanges, so you'd need to talk to your broker to see if it supports them. 
If you’re investing in gold, remember that it’s a commodity, and it’s up to you to make sure you’re not overpaying. The day you buy, check the spot price of gold (available at many Web sites, such as www.goldprice.org). Don’t pay more than a 5% to 8% markup over the spot price -- that’s the typical premium, according to Michael White, spokesman for the U.S. Mint.
To buy gold bullion or silver bullion for numismatic value, one needs to have a very good understanding of the collectable market. Often times, values will vary significantly from year to year. Remember, unlike a bullion price, a collectible coin is only worth what it can be sold for. Many buyers have been burned spending lots of money for a “collectable” and then selling it for far less.
Depending on your budget, personal objectives and investment time horizon, you may consider a dollar cost averaging investment strategy. Dollar cost averaging is a conservative approach that involves dividing the total sum to be invested into equal amounts and investing those fixed amounts at regular intervals over time. This approach enables you to scale up or down with the market.
Investing always requires some careful research. Investors in bullion coins need to be aware that physical assets come with ongoing storage costs, whether that is more insurance coverage for home storage or an ongoing rental of secure storage like a safety deposit box. Beyond keeping coins safe, investors need to approach the secondary market with caution as coin dealers may charge higher premiums based on numismatic factors. Shopping around for dealers with the smallest premiums over melt value is a good first step. It is also recommended to stick with the higher weight coins, as the 1 once coins trade at less of a premium over spot prices than smaller, more affordable coins. Of course, if you aren't solely interested in buying near the melt value, then bullion coins are more a collectible investment than a precious metals diversification play. In which case, best of luck - you may well need it.
A. The short answer is 'When you need it.' Gold, first and foremost, is wealth insurance. You cannot approach it the way you approach stock or real estate investments. Timing is not the real issue. The first question you need to ask yourself is whether or not you believe you need to own gold. If you answer that question in the affirmative, there is no point in delaying your actual purchase, or waiting for a more favorable price which may or may not appear. Cost averaging can be a good strategy. History tells us that panics, mania, crashes and collapses are as common to financial history as thunderstorms to placid summer afternoons. The real goal is to diversify so that your overall wealth is not compromised by economic dangers and uncertainties like the kind generated by the 2008 financial crisis.
The World Gold Council supports the development of gold markets and helps investors understand how investments in gold can help them achieve their investment objectives. We work to expand the options for individual and institutional investors to access the gold market by working with the financial industry to develop and promote new offerings through direct and intermediated channels.

Whether it is the tensions in the Middle East, Africa or elsewhere, it is becoming increasingly obvious that political and economic uncertainty is another reality of our modern economic environment. For this reason, investors typically look at gold as a safe haven during times of political and economic uncertainty. Why is this? Well, history is full of collapsing empires, political coups, and the collapse of currencies. During such times, investors who held gold were able to successfully protect their wealth and, in some cases, even use the commodity to escape from all of the turmoil. Consequently, whenever there are news events that hint at some type of global economic uncertainty, investors will often buy gold as a safe haven.
Chinese Silver Panda: Issued regularly as a silver bullion coin since 1989, the Chinese Silver Panda was the first silver bullion coin to use a new design for the obverse image of the Giant Panda. On the reverse, you'll find the Temple of Heaven's Hall of Prayer for Abundant Harvests, a design in use since 1983 when the Silver Panda debuted as a proof silver coin. Today, the Chinese Silver Panda is available as 30 Gram coins with .999 pure silver content.
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