A silver round is exactly what it sounds like. It is a round piece of pure silver. This form is similar to a coin, but unlike a coin it does not carry any face value. Because silver rounds cannot be used as legal tender, these bullion products may be produced by government and private mints, as well. Silver rounds come in various sizes, but like silver bullion coins the most common size is 1oz. Silver rounds carry the smallest premium over the spot silver price, making them a very good choice for investors looking to accumulate silver.
“ For the first time buying coins off the internet, I am more than pleased. Coins came in the quality promised and in the time frame that was stated with secure delivery. Also the prices and selections are good with excellent service. Since I will be buying again from Golden Eagle and can without resevation recommend it to other individuals. Sincerely, Wayne Schenk ”
With 9 locations throughout the greater Dallas area, this is one of the region’s largest precious metal dealers. Dallas Gold & Silver Exchange buys all forms of gold, silver, and platinum. They also deal in rare coins and paper currency. Their inventory includes more than 250 bullion products such as the American Eagle, Canadian Maple Leaf, South African Krugerrand, Credit Suisse gold bars, kilo silver bars, and more. The stock of rare and collectible coins at Dallas Gold & Silver exchange includes PCGS and NGC certified coins, raw coins, proof and mint sets, and silver dollars. Many of their rarest coins can be viewed and purchased through their website.
Gold bullion coins usually come in 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, 1/10 and 1/20 oz. sizes. Most countries have one design that remains constant each year; others (such as the Chinese Panda coins) have variations each year, and in most cases each coin is dated. A 1/10 oz bullion coin is about the same size as a U.S. dime. A 1 oz. gold bullion coin is about the size of a U.S. half dollar.

Investors who buy gold understand gold's benefits better than other investors. They know that economies are reliant on speculation and gambling, and that this makes things uncertain. When speculation fails and mistakes happen, gold shows its strength. Gold is a universally recognised measure of wealth and does not lose its value even if a fiat currency like the Euro collapses.

During the Middle Ages gold coins continued to be struck, and these are scarce, too. With the discovery of the New World this all changed. The amount of gold flowing out of the mines was enormous, and the Spanish who controlled much of it, used it to strike one of the most fabled coins of all times: The Gold Doubloon. Pirates killed for it, hurricanes sunk them by the chest full, and captain Ahab nailed one to the mast of the Pequod, to be claimed by the first sailor who spotted Moby Dick.

However, there's a downside as well. Because a miner is running an operating business, you are also facing the risk that things might not work out as planned. As noted above, mines don't always produce as much gold as expected, workers sometimes go on strike, and, unfortunately, mining is risky and disasters can take place that halt production and cost lives. All in all, gold miners can perform better or worse than gold -- depending on what's going on at the specific miner you're looking at.
Though most bars, coins, and rounds manufactured across the world, be it in Austria, USA, or China, contain 99.9% pure gold, a few mints like the Royal Canadian Mint surpass the typical purity levels by using 99.99% pure gold in their products. Even though a 0.09% purity increase might not seem like a lot, it vaults the gold products into an elite category of products.
Warren Buffett, the CEO of Berkshire Hathaway (tickere: BRK.A, BRK.B) and perhaps the greatest investor of all time, understands that fear. Gold investors, he says, are "right to be afraid of paper money. Their basic premise that paper money around the world is going to be worth less and less over time is absolutely correct. They have the correct basic premise. They should run from paper money."
Gold bullion is produced in the form of Gold coins, Gold bars and Gold rounds from mints and Precious Metal refiners around the world. When Gold buying, you invest in an asset class that is as old as civilization itself. For thousands of years, Gold bullion has held stable purchasing power during inflationary times but can play an important role in a modern portfolio. Gold prices generally move independent of stocks and can provide a bright spot in your investment portfolio during an economic downturn.
To buy gold bullion or silver bullion for numismatic value, one needs to have a very good understanding of the collectable market. Often times, values will vary significantly from year to year. Remember, unlike a bullion price, a collectible coin is only worth what it can be sold for. Many buyers have been burned spending lots of money for a “collectable” and then selling it for far less.
Gold jewelry: The problem with buying gold jewelry as an investment is that you pay a premium for the craftsmanship and the desirability of the design. Any piece of jewelry marked 14 karat or less will be below investment quality, and any resale for the sake of investing will be impacted by the need to refine the gold. On the other hand, it is possible to pick up antique or vintage gold for very little at estate sales and similar auctions where a seller may not recognize the true value of the metal content or if people simply aren't in the mood to bid much for it. Older pieces can carry more value due to their unique craftsmanship, so this can be a lucrative and enjoyable way to collect gold.
Lunar Series II: The Perth Mint’s most popular series in gold is the Lunar Series II collection. There is a new design each year in this program (2008-2019). Each new design coincides with the animal featured on the Zodiac for the Chinese Lunar Calendar, and these gold coins are available in weights ranging from 1/10 and 1/2 oz to 1 oz, 2 oz, and even 10 oz of pure gold.
When it comes to purchasing or selling bullion, the market value for gold (also referred to as "spot price") is the basis for all pricing. Almost all products on SD Bullion operate on a spot price plus the product premium (also referred to as "over spot") formula to determine the final price. For example, if the market value for gold is X and the product premium is Y, the final price would be X+Y=Z. Premium pricing is mostly consistent per product but the market value for silver changes vastly on a minute by minute basis. Our market feed integrates live up to the minute market prices from worldwide markets. We offer both live and historical gold prices available on our website's Live Market Prices page. You can customize charts to research and find trends in pricing and compare to other precious metal types.

Coins, bullion, and bars. If you're looking to own physical gold for its investment value, then coins, bullion, and bars are the best option. However, there are markups to consider here, as well. It costs money to take raw gold and turn it into a coin, and that's often passed on to the end customer. Also, most coin dealers will add a markup to their prices to compensate them for acting as middlemen. Think of it like a commission for a stock trade; coin dealers have to make a living, too. Perhaps the best option for most investors is to buy gold bullion directly from the U.S. Mint, so you know you are dealing with a reputable dealer.  
Mining-focused ETFs. That's why you might prefer to own an index-based product, like a mining-focused ETF. Some options here include VanEck Vectors Gold Miners ETF and VanEck Vectors Junior Gold Miners ETF. Both invest in gold miners (with the same caveats about exposure to other metals), but as you can tell from their names, they do slightly different things: The latter focuses on smaller gold miners. The expense ratios here are 0.53% and 0.54%, respectively. If you're looking for a single investment that provides broadly diversified exposure to gold miners, then low-cost index-based ETFs like these are a good option.  
Bullion coins are coins made from precious metals with a defined weight and content that are generally used for investment purposes. Bullion itself is the term for bulk precious metal that is cast as bars with a specified weight. Bullion coins are basically a smaller, more affordable version of bullion. Bullion are typically minted in weights that are fractions of one troy ounce to fit a variety of budgets. Bullion coins are usually made from gold and silver, but they are also be available in platinum and palladium. Many countries have their own official bullion coins, such as the American Eagle series of coins available from the United States Mint, and the Canadian Maple Leaf series offered by the Royal Canadian Mint.
These coins commemorate the famed Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra and the Musikverein Concert Hall where the musicians play. The Gold Vienna Philharmonic are widely-traded throughout Europe and around the world. Investors everywhere desire these lovely coins because they are unique in design, extraordinarily well made and carry the Austrian Mint's reputation for confidence and trust.

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To buy gold bullion or silver bullion for numismatic value, one needs to have a very good understanding of the collectable market. Often times, values will vary significantly from year to year. Remember, unlike a bullion price, a collectible coin is only worth what it can be sold for. Many buyers have been burned spending lots of money for a “collectable” and then selling it for far less.

Gold certificates are usually for unallocated gold, which means there's no specific gold associated with the certificate even though the company says it has enough gold to back all outstanding certificates. You can buy allocated gold certificates, where the certificates represent specific gold bullion, but the costs are higher. The big problem here is that the certificates are really only as good as the company backing them, sort of like banks before FDIC insurance was created. This is why one of the most desirable options for gold certificates is the Perth Mint, which is backed by the government of Western Australia. That said, if you are going to simply buy a paper representation of gold, you might want to consider exchange-traded funds instead. 
Bullion coins are often given a face value, but it is usually lower than the true value of the precious metals making up the coin. Bullion coins are often given a melt value, which is the theoretical value if you melted the coin down and sold it at the current spot price for the precious metal it is made of. So if the spot value of silver is $16 a troy ounce, then the melt value of a single half troy ounce silver bullion coin is $8.
Finally, you'll find as you shop our silver for sale that there are various silver bullion coin programs issued with beautiful finishes, unique weights, and low mintage figures. The designs in these issues are typically offered for a limited time and can feature as a few as one or two designs in a collection, or offer a robust number of different designs. The following are just a few examples of special issue silver bullion coins:
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