Gold stocks are typically more appealing to growth investors than to income investors. Gold stocks generally rise and fall with the price of gold, but there are well-managed mining companies that are profitable even when the price of gold is down. Increases in the price of gold are often magnified in gold stock prices. A relatively small increase in the price of gold can lead to significant gains in the best gold stocks and owners of gold stocks typically obtain a much higher return on investment (ROI) than owners of physical gold.
If you are buying gold coins in the U.S., chances are good that you will see American Gold Eagle coins for sale. These gold coins are produced by the U.S. Mint, and are one of the world’s most popular gold bullion coins. One of the nicest things about American Gold Eagle coins is that they are available in numerous weights such as 1/10th ounce, ¼ ounce, ½ ounce and 1 ounce.
False Claims – Unscrupulous sellers often overprice their coins, lie about the bullion content, or try to pass off ordinary bullion coins as rare collectible coins. Some fraudulent dealers may even try to sell coins that aren't bullion coins at all. Others may try to sell bullion pieces with the same design as coins from the U.S. Mint, but in different sizes. Indeed, private mints issue coins that look like bullion coins minted by foreign governments, but may have little or no gold content. Your best defense is to study the market and choose your dealer carefully.

Physical Gold adds security to your investment portfolio. As there is a finite amount of Gold in the world, Gold’s relative purchasing power tends to remain stable during periods of inflation. For example, in 1985, the cost of an ounce of Gold was about the cost of a nice men’s suit. Allowing for some peaks and valleys in the market, today, one ounce of Gold still costs about the same as a nice men’s suit, even though the price in dollars has nearly quadrupled. Gold prices do fluctuate, but they generally move independent of the stock market. For a stable investment independent of stocks and bonds that can protect your purchasing power long term, buy physical Gold.

Additionally, the metal of kings has been used as currency for centuries. The free market has selected it to be used as money for thousands of years, partly because it is transportable, with a high value-to-weight ratio. Its density makes it more difficult to counterfeit. It is also fungible in that all gold ounces are worth the same.  And it’s divisible, meaning that it does not lose its value just because it is broken into smaller increments.  And it’s durable – not corroding or tarnishing over the years. Historically, the first gold coins were made in Anatolia during the 6th century BC. Most modern bullion coins come in 1 ounce, ½ oz, ¼ oz, 1/10 oz, and even 1/20 oz sizes.


Local coin and bullion shops may carry various types of bullion bar and coin as well as numismatics and collectibles. Such shops may, however, carry smaller inventories and charge higher premiums compared to online dealers. This makes sense, after all, given the fact the brick and mortar coin shops tend to have higher operating costs compared to online dealers.

Over the trailing five year period through March 31, 2018 the standard deviation of gold, using ETF SPDR Gold Shares (NYSEMKT:GLD) as a proxy (more on this gold-owning ETF below), is 16. The annualized return over that span was a loss of around 4%. Putting those two numbers together, there is a reasonable probability that gold will provide a gain of between 12% and a loss of 20% in any given period. That's a pretty big range that dips soundly into negative territory. By comparison, the standard deviation of the S&P 500 Index over the same span was a little under 10 with an average annualized return of about 13%, suggesting the expected range was between a gain of 23% and a gain of 3%. Which one sounds safer to you?   
Gold has been one of the most prized substances known to man since before recorded history. We're lucky today because we have a myriad number of ways to own gold, many of which are just a click or a phone call away here at MCM. From ancient coins through world coins, Classic U.S. Gold and modern gold coins from the U.S. Mint and mints around the world, they're all here for you today.
As alluded to above, investors often make the mistake of buying so-called rare coins. These numismatic or semi-numismatic coins are meant for collectors, speculators, and hobbyists rather than people looking to reliably preserve and build wealth. Rare coin buying is exceedingly risky and often buyers pay inordinately high premiums and do not recoup their value. Rare coins are not really a gold investment… they are more akin to artwork. Some collectors buy coins for pleasure, because of their history or beauty, or because they have excess money to tie up in illiquid assets. Gold coins that are priced close to their actual melt value is a more prudent way to invest in precious metals.

Given the huge quantity of gold stored above ground compared to the annual production, the price of gold is mainly affected by changes in sentiment, which affects market supply and demand equally, rather than on changes in annual production.[16] According to the World Gold Council, annual mine production of gold over the last few years has been close to 2,500 tonnes.[17] About 2,000 tonnes goes into jewelry or industrial/dental production, and around 500 tonnes goes to retail investors and exchange-traded gold funds.[17]


The demand for jewelry is fairly constant, though economic downturns do, obviously, lead to some temporary reductions in demand from this industry. The demand from investors, including central banks, however, tends to ebb and flow with the economy and investor sentiment. So, when investors are worried about the economy, they often buy gold, and based on the increase in demand, push its price higher. If you want to keep track of gold's ups and downs, you can easily do so at the website of the World Gold Council, an industry trade group backed by some of the largest gold miners in the world. 
However, some gold dealers use these facts to scare investors into buying overpriced coins. Some history: Hello, the U.S. is no longer on the gold standard and hasn’t been since 1971. And the limit on gold ownership in the U.S. was repealed in 1974. So notwithstanding the paranoia-laden pitches of some salesmen (and right-wing radio hosts), there is no danger of gold confiscation.
The American Gold Eagle is among the most sought-after for collectors. These gold coins feature the image of an American eagle on one side. Gold Eagles aren't the only options out there for gold collectors though. The American buffalo features a design that incorporates a buffalo in gold. Some collectors also like collecting international gold coins. Both Canada and South Africa make these designs. Canadian bullion has the country's iconic maple leaf on one side.
The name or series of a bar, round, or coin plays a significant role in the demand for the product. To retain the freedom to invest in or divest out of a particular instrument, as and when the investor wants, it is advisable to stick to famous product names and series like the American Silver Eagles or Canadian Maple Leafs. Hence, at any given time you will be assured of scores of both active buyers and sellers in the market.
Purchasing gold for investment purposes has traditionally been a hedge against inflation and weakness in the US dollar. For thousands of years gold has been a store of wealth and value which continues today. Owning physical precious metals is a strategy of the very wealthy for centuries and although precious metals don't necessarily need to be your only investment, it may be wise to make them a part of your strategy moving forward.
Storing gold bullion products can take up considerable space. As secure storage space is a limited resource, products must be chosen with care. Stackability of the products purchased will affect the amount/value you can store in a given area of the limited secure storage at your disposal.  Value per square inch is a critical metric when buying relatively large quantities of gold bullion. Bullion bars allow substantially more amounts of gold per square inch compared to all other investment vehicles. On the other hand, gold coins and rounds are unwieldy options as they require casings, tubes, or boxes when storing large numbers.
Practically speaking, however, a buy-and-hold passive investing strategy may be best for the ordinary gold investor. Since economies tend to be cyclical, buy when the price of gold is down, whether or not your country is currently going through turmoil or you think it’s headed for some. In this way, you don’t have to worry about buying when everyone else is buying and driving the price up.

Gold coins minted pre-1933 come in a range of monetary values. Each of these coin values also has a number of varieties for each denomination, depending on which year it was produced. Gold pieces were coins that were produced in small denominations such as 1-dollar, 3 dollars, and 4 dollars. The eagle was another major variety that comes in four denominations: 20-dollar double eagle, 10-dollar eagle, 5-dollar half eagle, and 2.50-dollar quarter eagle.


Gold rounds look like gold coins, but they have no currency value.[43][44] They range in similar sizes as gold coins, including 0.05 troy ounce, 1 troy ounce, and larger. Unlike gold coins, gold rounds commonly have no additional metals added to them for durability purposes and do not have to be made by a government mint, which allows the gold rounds to have a lower overhead price as compared to gold coins. On the other hand, gold rounds are normally not as collectible as gold coins.

Since the price of gold tends to be dramatically cyclical, subject to many factors involving supply and demand, it can be quite difficult to valuate gold in an environment of constantly depreciating paper currencies. One way to valuate gold is to compare it to the price of stocks, which tends to be more stable. The Dow/gold ratio is the Dow Jones Industrial Average relative to gold's price per ounce (or how many ounces of gold the Dow can buy). A high Dow/gold ratio means stocks are overpriced and gold is cheap, while a low Dow/gold ratio means gold is overpriced and stocks are cheap. One should consider buying stocks and selling gold when the Dow/gold ratio falls well below the historic trend-line (which has recently averaged about 20 or higher). Conversely, one might consider selling stocks and buying gold when the Dow/gold ratio is significantly above the historic trend-line.


A huge amount of investment in gold comes from individuals looking to protect their wealth from such dangers. Gold and other precious metals have been used as forms of currency and as symbols of status in jewellery and other items for thousands of years, testament to their intrinsic value. Precious metals have outlived other forms of currency and it is this timeless ability to maintain a high value that attracts investors who believe that gold is a safe investment.
There are thousands of gold products on the market, but the list of well-known bullion products from reputable mints and refineries is short. Generally, you want to buy gold coins or bars from one of the major national mints or larger private refineries. You will notice these are the only products we feature on the SchiffGold website. (Read more about our product policies here.)
Given that $52 billion worth of gold was sold last year for investment purposes, according to the World Gold Council, it’s not surprising that shady dealers have lined up for a piece of the action. Most of the total was invested in gold mutual funds or exchange-traded funds. But some of us like to possess the lustrous stuff by buying it in coins or bars -- and that’s when you can get ripped off. Regulators say the number of rip-offs is rising with the price of the precious metal.

Numismatic simply means collectible. Numismatic coins are rare, old or valuable coins that are worth more than just their melt value because they are collector’s items. A gold or silver coin (even platinum and palladium) can be both bullion and numismatic. By their manufactured nature the coins are bullion, but some specific years and types add value on top of the metal spot value of the coin, making them numismatic. Some specific coins can earn substantial premiums above and beyond the metal’s bullion value simply due to the fact that the coin issue is extremely hard to find. Additionally, coins in very good or perfect issue condition will often be worth far more than circulated bullion coins. Finding a protected, rare issue makes a bullion coin unique, which is why collectors will pay a high price to get their hands on it.
Reverse designs in the Queen’s Beast Series include 10 different heraldic beasts in all. Launched in 2016 with the Lion of England, other designs include the Red Dragon of Wales, Black Bull of Clarence, and the Unicorn of Scotland. The obverse of each coin features Queen Elizabeth II’s effigy, with all reverse and obverse designs from Jody Clark of the Royal Mint.

The value of numismatic coins is determined by features such as condition, age, rarity and the number of coins originally minted. An example of a coveted collector's coin is the Spur Royal. The grade of the coin also matters, which is a numerical score assigned based on a visual evaluation of the amount of wear. Basic grades are good, fine, and un-circulated. The Universal rarity scale and the Sheldon rarity scale are the scales used to determine how rare a coin might be.
Investors who are solely interested in Silver’s stable purchasing power can find security in buying Silver rounds. Silver rounds are circular discs often manufactured by private mints, though sometimes produced by government mints. They have no “face value” and are not recognized as legal tender. Silver rounds are not quite as diverse or collectible as Silver coins, but are an excellent choice for those who want to invest in Silver as an anti-inflation hedge.
Purchase gold coins online as well as silver coins with Golden Eagle. We offer gold coins & gold bars with competitive prices. It is simple to buy gold with Golden Eagle Coins. We specialize in a wide variety of gold bullion coins and other gold bullion products. Our large inventory caters to both the gold bullion investor as well as the collector.

Most of the countries that mint gold have a design that stays the same each year. Some vary the designs annually and date the gold coin, such as the Chinese Panda coins. Proof (PF) uncirculated coins are typically more expensive than non-proof gold coins. They require extra time and effort to make and can have a slightly higher value than non-proof because of demand from collectors. However, both contain the same amount of precious metal so investing in proof coins is highly speculative and generally a play on collectible value as opposed to the metal itself.
Southwest Numismatic Corp. is a PCGS authorized dealer operating by appointment only. Though they have little internet presence, they are known for high-grade coins at reasonable prices. They specialize in rare coins including early U.S. coins, such as copper, small cents, and colonial or territorial issues. Southwest Numismatic also deals in ancient and foreign coins, paper currency, and gold and silver bullion coins.
These coins come in fractions of an ounce, such has a half-ounce, a quarter-ounce and even one-twentieth of an ounce. You’ll pay a higher markup for such coins than for one-ounce coins. The only real reason to own them is if you believe in a future meltdown of society, at which point paper money will be worthless and you’ll need small (gold) change to buy, say, ammo, freeze-dried food or a latte.
The best time to invest in gold is when inflation is expected to take hold and force down the value of the national currency. The earlier you can detect such drops, the more room you have to make a profit. Leading indicators such as stock market declines and political turmoil may indicate a future devaluation of your country’s currency. Announcements by reserve banks to print out more local currency can also indicate a good time to invest in gold.
Many coin and small bar dealers offer 'free' shipping when you buy online, but in reality that cost has been shifted into the price you pay for the coin or bar, along with the cost of its manufacture and the dealer's profit margin. In total, it is not unusual for all of these costs to result in you paying 5-8% over the actual wholesale price of the gold you buy.
A coin or bar dealer will not buy gold from you at the spot price, as they have to factor in their business overheads. They also have to consider the chance that the bar or coin is not what they think it is. Some rarer coins might be quoted at prices above spot, but in gold bullion products like small bars, Sovereigns or Krugerrands, this usually results in you receiving 2-5% less than the spot price when you come to sell.

Over the trailing five year period through March 31, 2018 the standard deviation of gold, using ETF SPDR Gold Shares (NYSEMKT:GLD) as a proxy (more on this gold-owning ETF below), is 16. The annualized return over that span was a loss of around 4%. Putting those two numbers together, there is a reasonable probability that gold will provide a gain of between 12% and a loss of 20% in any given period. That's a pretty big range that dips soundly into negative territory. By comparison, the standard deviation of the S&P 500 Index over the same span was a little under 10 with an average annualized return of about 13%, suggesting the expected range was between a gain of 23% and a gain of 3%. Which one sounds safer to you?   
Australian Coins: Struck by the Perth Mint, the Australian Kangaroo gold coin is available in 1/10 ounce, ¼ ounce, ½ ounce, and 1-ounce weights. The coin design changes each year, and the 2017 version features a kangaroo leaping across the outback. One of the benefits of the Australian Kangaroo gold coin is that it is acceptable to purchase in an IRA.
The performance of gold bullion is often compared to stocks as different investment vehicles. Gold is regarded by some as a store of value (without growth) whereas stocks are regarded as a return on value (i.e., growth from anticipated real price increase plus dividends). Stocks and bonds perform best in a stable political climate with strong property rights and little turmoil. The attached graph shows the value of Dow Jones Industrial Average divided by the price of an ounce of gold. Since 1800, stocks have consistently gained value in comparison to gold in part because of the stability of the American political system.[56] This appreciation has been cyclical with long periods of stock outperformance followed by long periods of gold outperformance. The Dow Industrials bottomed out a ratio of 1:1 with gold during 1980 (the end of the 1970s bear market) and proceeded to post gains throughout the 1980s and 1990s.[57] The gold price peak of 1980 also coincided with the Soviet Union's invasion of Afghanistan and the threat of the global expansion of communism. The ratio peaked on January 14, 2000 a value of 41.3 and has fallen sharply since.

Banks may issue gold certificates for gold that is allocated (fully reserved) or unallocated (pooled). Unallocated gold certificates are a form of fractional reserve banking and do not guarantee an equal exchange for metal in the event of a run on the issuing bank's gold on deposit. Allocated gold certificates should be correlated with specific numbered bars, although it is difficult to determine whether a bank is improperly allocating a single bar to more than one party.[52]
Fees for actively managed funds, meanwhile, can be materially higher than those of index-based products. You'll want to read a fund's prospectus to get a better handle on how it invests (its approach and whether it is actively managed or a passive index fund) and its cost structure. Note that costs can vary greatly between funds. For instance, Vanguard Precious Metals Fund has an expense ratio of 0.43%, while Fidelity Select Gold Portfolio's expense ratio is 0.84%. Costs can range quite a bit, and these are two relatively low-cost fund sponsors. 
APMEX: (OK) 405-595-2100 and press 1 unless you want to be on hold forever. For purchases of one to 19 coins there is a 5% markup; for 20 to 99 coins it’s 4.8%; for 100 or more it’s 4%. You must open a free online account. You’ll pay $25 shipping for orders under $25,000; shipping is free if you buy more. Payment by check or wire transfer is preferred.
Gold mining stocks. One major issue with a direct investment in gold is that there's no growth potential. An ounce of gold today will be the same ounce of gold 100 years from now. That's one of the key reasons famed investor Warren Buffett doesn't like gold -- it is, essentially, an unproductive asset. He prefers to own investments that are "procreative," meaning they produce an income stream of some sort.
Fidelitrade: (DE) 302-762-6200. You must open an individual Fidelitrade account. The markup is 4.8%. Buying 100 ounces or more gives you a discount of $1.25 to $1.50 per ounce. The company also charges a commission. Buy up to $15,000 worth and the commission is 1%; for $15,000 to $50,000 it’s 0.75%; for $50,000 and up it’s 0.5%. The company also charges shipping and handling, which is $35 plus $2.25 per ounce of gold.
Gold bars can refer to a multitude of different things. Also called ingots or bullion, a gold bar in the most simple terms is gold of certain purity that has been formed into the shape of a rectangular cube. However, there are a lot more terms that can be applied to better describe a gold bar. For instance, if a gold bar is minted, that means it went through a more rigorous creation process. It involves a bank or refinery cutting the gold into set dimensions. In this way, minted gold bars should all be precise in regards to dimensions and purity. A cast bar is easier to make. It merely involves pouring the melted gold into a mold and then letting it form and harden into a bar form. Since these bars aren't cut to specific dimensions, cast bars may be unevenly shaped and vary slightly in appearance from bar to bar. It's often common for cast bars to be handled differently than minted bars. A mint bar will frequently be sealed in a protective packaging whereas a cast bar is more likely to be handled directly.

Over the years, Gold price history has shown that the global economic climate primarily determines the value. When the largest economies in the world, including the United States, are experiencing growth, demand for Gold goes down as investors are more willing to try riskier options such as the stock market. When leading countries suffer a recession, the demand for Gold goes back up due to its historic role as a safe haven investment. As seen many times in the history of Gold, prices will once again go up. This relationship between historical rates and the current value of Gold has been viewed many times over the years and is a central determining factor used by market analysts.
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