There are few things as American as the buffalo. The depiction of the American buffalo and Indian Chief is prominent on these Gold coins. This coin reprises the famous James Earle Fraser design from the 1913 Buffalo Nickel. The Gold American Buffalo coins are the first .9999 fine Gold coin produced by the United States Mint, making them a highly popular choice among Gold investors.

Karat weight (K or kt) is a traditional fraction-based system used to denote the fineness of gold, with one karat being equal to 1/24 part of pure gold in an alloy. With the precision of modern assaying techniques, however, the fineness of gold ingots and bullion is more likely to appear as a decimal measurement. In this system, pure gold would be denoted as 1.000 fine. However, since absolutely pure gold is very soft and therefore not suitable for coinage or ingots, it is generally accepted worldwide that anything above .999 fine qualifies as 24K. Below is a karat weight to fineness conversion chart.
There is no precious metal in the world coveted more than gold. The famous “yellow metal” has been a standard by which wealth is measured for centuries, and as civilizations took the first steps out of the Dark Ages and into international trade in the Middle Ages and beyond, gold was there as the standard unit of commerce used by nations and people who spoke different languages. Despite language and cultural barriers, everyone understands the value of gold. Today, gold bullion remains a primary vehicle for private investment and the protection of wealth. The JM Bullion catalog contains a wide array of gold bullion products, some of which you can learn more about below.

The Australian Gold Kangaroo is a beautiful 99.99% pure gold bullion coin minted by the Perth Mint, the government mint of Australia. Each coin ships inside its own plastic holder. The Perth Mint's unbeatable minting experience and its use of advanced manufacturing technology contribute to the coins' reputation of being the highest quality in the more...


Investing always requires some careful research. Investors in bullion coins need to be aware that physical assets come with ongoing storage costs, whether that is more insurance coverage for home storage or an ongoing rental of secure storage like a safety deposit box. Beyond keeping coins safe, investors need to approach the secondary market with caution as coin dealers may charge higher premiums based on numismatic factors. Shopping around for dealers with the smallest premiums over melt value is a good first step. It is also recommended to stick with the higher weight coins, as the 1 once coins trade at less of a premium over spot prices than smaller, more affordable coins. Of course, if you aren't solely interested in buying near the melt value, then bullion coins are more a collectible investment than a precious metals diversification play. In which case, best of luck - you may well need it.
Instead of buying gold itself, investors can buy the companies that produce the gold as shares in gold mining companies. If the gold price rises, the profits of the gold mining company could be expected to rise and the worth of the company will rise and presumably the share price will also rise. However, there are many factors to take into account and it is not always the case that a share price will rise when the gold price increases. Mines are commercial enterprises and subject to problems such as flooding, subsidence and structural failure, as well as mismanagement, negative publicity, nationalization, theft and corruption. Such factors can lower the share prices of mining companies.
The Federal Trade Commission reports a rise in boiler rooms hawking gold coins or bars. (A boiler room is filled with salespeople who cold call prospects and use high-pressure sales tactics.) Dama Brown, staff attorney for consumer affairs in the FTC’s Atlanta office, says that these operators usually make inflated claims about the potential profit from gold, such as “tripling your money in 30 days.” Such claims are often coupled with warnings about the weak economy and how gold, as a hard asset, is less risky than stocks, she says.
When you pair assets that move differently from each other, you create a more diversified portfolio. This is why mixing bonds with stocks is the foundation of so many portfolios. Bonds have a negative correlation with stocks, meaning they tend to go up when stocks are going down, and vice versa. Here's the interesting thing: Gold's correlation with bonds over the past decade or so is roughly 0.25, still very low. So gold doesn't track along with stocks, and it doesn't track along with bonds, either. Adding a small amount of gold to a stock and bond portfolio -- probably no more than 10% -- can help increase diversification and the ultimate safety of the entire portfolio.
Gold prices fluctuate daily just like stocks and currencies, since it trades around the world and around the clock. There are many factors that can affect the price of gold coins, including political events, the stock market, and other economic and monetary issues. Gold prices tend to perform strongest when economic or monetary conditions deteriorate.
Gold and gold bullion come in various forms. An investor can buy bars, coins, and rounds in almost any size and quantity. Buyers typically get a discount for buying in large quantities or bulk. The yellow metal is produced by mints in various sizes, shapes, and weights. It can be purchased from a local merchant or you can order online from a reputable dealer like Money Metals Exchange. Most buyers opt for the security, convenience, and safety of buying from respected online dealers because they frequently have the best prices and usually are not required to charge sales taxes.
Practically speaking, however, a buy-and-hold passive investing strategy may be best for the ordinary gold investor. Since economies tend to be cyclical, buy when the price of gold is down, whether or not your country is currently going through turmoil or you think it’s headed for some. In this way, you don’t have to worry about buying when everyone else is buying and driving the price up.
The primary benefits to gold bullion bars for gold buyers are diversity and affordability. Gold bullion bars have lower premiums over the spot price of gold when compared to gold bullion coins, and the variety of options is far more diverse. Gold bullion bars are available not only in the aforementioned weights, but also styles including cast, hand-poured, and minted ingots. Gold bullion bars are struck continuously to meet the demand for gold, with the following refineries and mints representing some of the greatest refiners of gold bars:
Avoid rare coins. Rare coins require more diligence and expertise when buying them, Mladjenovic says. Two coins may look alike but have completely different grades. This difference can add up to thousands of dollars. You should hire a professional grading service and get a certificate of authenticity when buying rare coins — a hassle for most investors.
If you are looking to buy gold in the United States, you have numerous choices when it comes to where you purchase your gold. Local coin and bullion shops and online gold and silver dealers represent the two primary types of retailers at which you can buy gold, silver and other metals products. There are, however, some key differences between the two.
Bullion coins are coins made from precious metals with a defined weight and content that are generally used for investment purposes. Bullion itself is the term for bulk precious metal that is cast as bars with a specified weight. Bullion coins are basically a smaller, more affordable version of bullion. Bullion are typically minted in weights that are fractions of one troy ounce to fit a variety of budgets. Bullion coins are usually made from gold and silver, but they are also be available in platinum and palladium. Many countries have their own official bullion coins, such as the American Eagle series of coins available from the United States Mint, and the Canadian Maple Leaf series offered by the Royal Canadian Mint.
White says that American Eagle Bullion coins, one of the most popular coins for investing in gold, first make their way into the market when they are sold to the Mint’s “authorized purchasers.” (See the list below of the authorized purchasers and their prices, terms and conditions. If you’re new to buying gold, they are a great place to start.) Gold coins are also sold in commemorative editions directly to the public, but these are more expensive. The Mint marks up the price of the coins to cover the value of the gold and the actual minting, as well as shipping and other costs, White says. Dealers say that markup is about 3%. Then the authorized purchasers -- some of whom sell directly to the public and all of whom sell to other dealers -- add their own markup, as do the dealers who buy the coins.
Bullion coins are minted from precious metal, usually gold or silver, and bought for investment purposes from major banks, coin dealers, brokerage firms, and precious metal dealers. Their value is based on their gold or silver bullion content. Prices fluctuate daily, depending on the price of gold and silver in the world markets. Perhaps the best-known bullion coins are the American Gold Eagle, the Canadian Maple Leaf, the Australian Gold Nugget, and the South African Krugerrand.

Silver is produced in the form of Silver coins, Silver bars and Silver rounds from mints and Precious Metal refiners around the world. Silver is one of the world’s most important commodities and an affordable Precious Metal investment option. For thousands of years, Silver bullion has served as a primary monetary metal, but today it is most commonly used as an industrial commodity. As an investment, Silver can play an important role in a modern diversified portfolio. Silver prices generally move independent of stocks and can provide a bright spot in your investment portfolio during an economic downturn.

In 2008, despite the financial crisis, some investors continued to hedge against a dollar decline caused by two new factors. One was the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing program, launched in December 2008. In that program, the Fed exchanged credit for bank Treasurys. The Fed simply created the credit out of thin air. Investors were concerned this increase in the money supply would create inflation.


Gold bars, or ingots as some call them, are a great way to purchase gold and invest without the high premiums. They offer the investor an assortment of sizes, from 1 gram to a ten ounce bar or larger; accommodating any particular taste. Gold bars are 24 karat and .9999 fine; proposing they are the best choice when it comes to getting the most pure gold per dollar. Most investors enjoy the gold bars because they like having the option to buy gold online and trade in small increments, instead of having to trade one large bar. Unlike most currency, gold is recognized and valued all over the world, making it the perfect investment.
Gold coin prices are determined by a variety of different factors, including condition, availability, and composition. Uncirculated coins that have never been handled in the marketplace will typically bring a high price because the condition is unblemished. Accessibility is a factor in Gold coin pricing because if a coin is in short supply, retailers can charge a higher price to collectors. The composition of a particular currency is critical to value since coins made with a more significant percentage of Gold have more melt value.
Gold exchange-traded products may include exchange-traded funds (ETFs), exchange-traded notes (ETNs), and closed-end funds (CEFs), which are traded like shares on the major stock exchanges. The first gold ETF, Gold Bullion Securities (ticker symbol "GOLD"), was launched in March 2003 on the Australian Stock Exchange, and originally represented exactly 0.1 troy ounces (3.1 g) of gold. As of November 2010, SPDR Gold Shares is the second-largest exchange-traded fund in the world by market capitalization.[45]
Gold bullion is produced in the form of Gold coins, Gold bars and Gold rounds from mints and Precious Metal refiners around the world. When Gold buying, you invest in an asset class that is as old as civilization itself. For thousands of years, Gold bullion has held stable purchasing power during inflationary times but can play an important role in a modern portfolio. Gold prices generally move independent of stocks and can provide a bright spot in your investment portfolio during an economic downturn.

Gold bullion coins usually come in 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, 1/10 and 1/20 oz. sizes. Most countries have one design that remains constant each year; others (such as the Chinese Panda coins) have variations each year, and in most cases each coin is dated. A 1/10 oz bullion coin is about the same size as a U.S. dime. A 1 oz. gold bullion coin is about the size of a U.S. half dollar.


In addition to American Gold Eagles, we carry large quantities of foreign coins and gold bars. Our gold bar selection includes Pamp Suisse, Perth Mint & Credit Suisse bars. We also offer American Gold Buffalo coins, pre-1933 gold bullion, and other gold products. Among precious metals, gold is renowned for its beauty and rarity. For the latest update in spot gold prices, please refer to the box in the upper right-hand corner. Order online today for secure delivery or place an order by phone at 1-800-735-1311.
Gold is the most popular of the investment precious metals, opposed to silver, platinum and palladium. However, when priced in dollars, it can appear volatile, although not usually as much as silver. From 2005 to 2011, both gold and silver increased dramatically in value, even more rapidly than the dollar’s purchasing power fell. In addition, its historic role as money, silver is essential in many industries, means there is always a need for it. Conversely, gold has limited industrial use and – other than its role as a core investment asset – it is associated with luxury purchases, such as jewelry.
Imagine yourself sitting in a stream swirling water in a metal pan, desperately hoping to see a small yellow glint. That flash would be light reflecting off gold, the metal that you might have traveled across a continent to find in the early 1850s. But why? What's so special about gold that people were willing to uproot their lives in the hopes of finding this precious metal? And, more important, why does gold still hold such a prominent place in our global economy? Here's the introduction to gold you need before you start investing in it, including a look at your choices -- jewelry, coins, bullion, gold certificates, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), mutual funds, futures contracts, gold mining stocks, and gold streaming and royalty companies -- and a discussion of the best gold investing strategy for beginners.
An investor who spent thousands of pounds on gold at its peak in 2011 will have lost a considerable amount of money as precious metals entered a sustained bear market lasting several years, and may argue that other investments would have been safer. However, while the value of other assets may have dwindled to nothing in such circumstances gold, even when well below its peak, maintained a value of hundreds of pounds per ounce. The price of gold does fluctuate and it is therefore possible to choose the wrong moment to invest, causing you to lose money. However, the fact that gold is a tangible commodity with an intrinsic value means that it is less likely than any other asset to completely lose its value. While paper currencies are prone to becoming completely devalued by hyperinflation, gold bullion is not, making it a safe investment for those looking to protect their wealth in the long-term.
Numismatic simply means collectible. Numismatic coins are rare, old or valuable coins that are worth more than just their melt value because they are collector’s items. A gold or silver coin (even platinum and palladium) can be both bullion and numismatic. By their manufactured nature the coins are bullion, but some specific years and types add value on top of the metal spot value of the coin, making them numismatic. Some specific coins can earn substantial premiums above and beyond the metal’s bullion value simply due to the fact that the coin issue is extremely hard to find. Additionally, coins in very good or perfect issue condition will often be worth far more than circulated bullion coins. Finding a protected, rare issue makes a bullion coin unique, which is why collectors will pay a high price to get their hands on it.
To buy gold bullion or silver bullion for numismatic value, one needs to have a very good understanding of the collectable market. Often times, values will vary significantly from year to year. Remember, unlike a bullion price, a collectible coin is only worth what it can be sold for. Many buyers have been burned spending lots of money for a “collectable” and then selling it for far less.
After that, investors are often attracted to gold miners like industry giants Barrick Gold (NYSE:ABX), Goldcorp, and Newmont Mining. The shares of gold miners usually track the price of the metal and they can invest in their assets to increase production over time. The shares of miners, however, come with additional risks. For example, many miners are focused on gold, but that's not the only metal they produce. Barrick gets around 90% of its revenue from gold; the rest comes from copper and other sources -- it's not exactly a pure play. 
Gold mining stocks have their benefits and their drawbacks, and aren't the purest way to own gold. If you choose to take this route, you'll want to pay close attention to a company's mining costs, existing mine portfolio, and expansion opportunities at both existing and new assets. All of these will play a role in determining what an investor is willing to pay for a gold miner's stock (in addition to the spot price of the metal itself, of course).
A. Gold owners are a group of people I have come to know very well in my 40+ years in the business. Contrary to the less than flattering picture sometimes painted by the mainstream press, the people we have helped become gold owners are among those we rely upon most in our daily lives -- our physicians and dentists, nurses and teachers, plumbers, carpenters and building contractors, business owners, attorneys, engineers and university professors (to name a few.) In other words, gold ownership is pretty much a Main Street endeavor. A recent Gallup poll found that 34% of American investors rated gold the best investment "regardless of gender, age, income or party ID. . ." In that survey, gold was rated higher than stocks, bonds, real estate and bank savings.
Bullion coins are minted from precious metal, usually gold or silver, and bought for investment purposes from major banks, coin dealers, brokerage firms, and precious metal dealers. Their value is based on their gold or silver bullion content. Prices fluctuate daily, depending on the price of gold and silver in the world markets. Perhaps the best-known bullion coins are the American Gold Eagle, the Canadian Maple Leaf, the Australian Gold Nugget, and the South African Krugerrand.
An investor who spent thousands of pounds on gold at its peak in 2011 will have lost a considerable amount of money as precious metals entered a sustained bear market lasting several years, and may argue that other investments would have been safer. However, while the value of other assets may have dwindled to nothing in such circumstances gold, even when well below its peak, maintained a value of hundreds of pounds per ounce. The price of gold does fluctuate and it is therefore possible to choose the wrong moment to invest, causing you to lose money. However, the fact that gold is a tangible commodity with an intrinsic value means that it is less likely than any other asset to completely lose its value. While paper currencies are prone to becoming completely devalued by hyperinflation, gold bullion is not, making it a safe investment for those looking to protect their wealth in the long-term.
Research is everything. Your decision to buy gold online wouldn’t have been taken lightly and should be backed by your own research. Much the same, when it comes to selecting your chosen bullion dealer, again research is vital. The Internet is the best place to conduct your research. The Internet holds information about the impartial experiences, opinions and recommendations of millions of people all around the world. It sounds obvious, but why not start your research by simply typing in the bullion dealers brand name into Google. The Internet really is the world's largest open forum in which companies have no control. It will become quickly apparent if a bullion dealer has a negative online reputation, in which case they should be avoided at all costs.
Many banks offer gold accounts where gold can be instantly bought or sold just like any foreign currency on a fractional reserve basis.[citation needed] Swiss banks offer similar service on a fully allocated basis. Pool accounts, such as those offered by some providers, facilitate highly liquid but unallocated claims on gold owned by the company. Digital gold currency systems operate like pool accounts and additionally allow the direct transfer of fungible gold between members of the service. Other operators, by contrast, allows clients to create a bailment on allocated (non-fungible) gold, which becomes the legal property of the buyer.

Another example is the US $20 gold coin ("double eagle"), which has raised lettering around its rim. If the coin is uncirculated, the letters will be flat on top. If slightly rounded, and the coin is uncirculated, it is a counterfeit. There are other counterfeit double eagles in which the gold and copper alloy was not thoroughly mixed. These counterfeits will have a slightly mottled appearance.[25]

If you want a low-cost way to invest in the short-term direction of gold’s price or to employ leverage with options—and you never want or need to take delivery of your metal—bullion ETFs can be ideal. But if the main reason you’re investing in gold is for protection of your financial assets during an economic downturn or “Black Swan” type event, it hardly makes sense to place your trust in the banking system.
A. A solid, professional gold firm can go a long way in helping the investor shortcut the learning curve. A good gold firm can help you avoid some the problems and pitfalls encountered along the way, and provide some direction. It can help you in the beginning and through the course of your gold ownership both in making additions to your portfolio and liquidations.
Why sell bullion coins? At some point they will appreciate enough to represent a very attractive source of income. This can boost savings in gold accounts like a precious metals IRA, or offset an investment loss elsewhere. The trick to selling is to get a fair to good price. Trying to win a major sale of the year likely won’t happen, but good sales happen regularly. Research and watching spot market pricing of precious metals is the first step, and selling to reliable buyers is the second. Scottsdale Bullion and Coin, for example, will purchase gold bullion coins at very fair prices, making it a good source to sell gold and silver coins. It is possible to sell privately, but always make sure to get paid first before releasing a coin. And don’t trust credit card payments unless you are protected from chargebacks. Many scammers buy a coin and then claim to their credit card company it was never delivered. The charge gets reversed, and the seller is then out both the coin and the payment.

Bullion coins are minted from precious metal, usually gold or silver, and bought for investment purposes from major banks, coin dealers, brokerage firms, and precious metal dealers. Their value is based on their gold or silver bullion content. Prices fluctuate daily, depending on the price of gold and silver in the world markets. Perhaps the best-known bullion coins are the American Gold Eagle, the Canadian Maple Leaf, the Australian Gold Nugget, and the South African Krugerrand.
Depending on your budget, personal objectives and investment time horizon, you may consider a dollar cost averaging investment strategy. Dollar cost averaging is a conservative approach that involves dividing the total sum to be invested into equal amounts and investing those fixed amounts at regular intervals over time. This approach enables you to scale up or down with the market.
Gold is the most popular of the investment precious metals, opposed to silver, platinum and palladium. However, when priced in dollars, it can appear volatile, although not usually as much as silver. From 2005 to 2011, both gold and silver increased dramatically in value, even more rapidly than the dollar’s purchasing power fell. In addition, its historic role as money, silver is essential in many industries, means there is always a need for it. Conversely, gold has limited industrial use and – other than its role as a core investment asset – it is associated with luxury purchases, such as jewelry.
Perhaps the biggest factor in the growth of silver mining, however, was the Spanish discovery of The New World in 1492. Production in the Americas by far exceeded anything that had been done previously. Silver mining continued to grow and flourish, and eventually new discoveries were made in other parts of the world such as China, Canada, Australia and Africa. In the past century, the technological advances made by humans have helped drive silver production to new heights and are ever increasing its demand. In fact, global mine production of silver now averages 671 million troy ounces per year!
While it is next to impossible to buy Silver at spot, reputable retailers such as APMEX make it easy to get the best price available at a competitive premium over spot. The term spot refers to the current market price for a 1 oz unit of Gold, a rate that continually fluctuates during the day. Investors want to pay as close to the current spot price as possible with small premiums giving the best chance at a good margin when selling later. There are, however, other factors that make a higher premium worth paying, such as a history of appreciation, availability, or reputation of quality from the mint of origin. While all Precious Metals including Gold are sold at a premium, this small additional cost is what pays for expenses such as mining, refining, production, and collectible market value.

GovMint.com® is a private distributor of coin and currency issues and privately licensed collectibles, and is not affiliated with the U.S. government. GovMint.com is not an investment company and does not offer financial advice. The collectible coin market is highly speculative and involves risk. You must decide for yourself if you are willing to accept these risks, including the risk that you may not be able to liquidate your purchases at prices acceptable to you. GovMint.com makes every effort to ensure facts, figures and offers are accurate; however, errors may and do occur. GovMint.com reserves the right, within its sole discretion and without prior notice to the consumer, to decline to consummate any sale based on such errors. All facts and figures, and populations of graded, autographed or pedigreed coins, are deemed accurate as of the date of publication, but may change significantly over time. GovMint.com, ModernCoinMart®, and MCM® are brands of Asset Marketing Services®. All rights reserved ©GovMint.com.
But this gold standard did not last forever. During the 1900s, there were several key events that eventually led to the transition of gold out of the monetary system. In 1913, the Federal Reserve was created and started issuing promissory notes (the present day version of our paper money) that could be redeemed in gold on demand. The Gold Reserve Act of 1934 gave the U.S. government title to all the gold coins in circulation and put an end to the minting of any new gold coins. In short, this act began establishing the idea that gold or gold coins were no longer necessary in serving as money. The U.S. abandoned the gold standard in 1971 when its currency ceased to be backed by gold.

We've partnered with The Foundation for Learning and Youth Travel Education (FLYTE), a nonprofit organization that empowers youth living in underserved communities through transformative travel experiences. FLYTE teaches that we are more alike than we realize. By bridging the gap between fear and understanding, FLYTE empowers future generations by connecting them to the world.
Goldline International, a major dealer, has come under fire by U.S. Representative Anthony Weiner (D-NY) for the high markups it charges on such coins. For example, Goldline and some other dealers push a French gold coin, the 20-franc “Rooster.” Weiner says Goldline charges 69% more than the melt value of the Rooster, which has no numismatic value.
Thus, some rounds, coins, and gold bars of similar weights can have substantially lower prices compared to their more popular counterparts. However, gold coins usually enjoy a higher premium than other gold investment options due to official recognition from a sovereign government. Even though the face value given to the coin is nominal in nature, it inspires confidence among buyers.
GovMint.com® is a private distributor of coin and currency issues and privately licensed collectibles, and is not affiliated with the U.S. government. GovMint.com is not an investment company and does not offer financial advice. The collectible coin market is highly speculative and involves risk. You must decide for yourself if you are willing to accept these risks, including the risk that you may not be able to liquidate your purchases at prices acceptable to you. GovMint.com makes every effort to ensure facts, figures and offers are accurate; however, errors may and do occur. GovMint.com reserves the right, within its sole discretion and without prior notice to the consumer, to decline to consummate any sale based on such errors. All facts and figures, and populations of graded, autographed or pedigreed coins, are deemed accurate as of the date of publication, but may change significantly over time. GovMint.com, ModernCoinMart®, and MCM® are brands of Asset Marketing Services®. All rights reserved ©GovMint.com.
Lunar Series II: The Perth Mint’s most popular series in gold is the Lunar Series II collection. There is a new design each year in this program (2008-2019). Each new design coincides with the animal featured on the Zodiac for the Chinese Lunar Calendar, and these gold coins are available in weights ranging from 1/10 and 1/2 oz to 1 oz, 2 oz, and even 10 oz of pure gold.
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