Mainly a part of the discussion when we talk about any silver bullion instrument – premium over spot refers to how much more a product is worth (premium charged) over the melt value of silver present in the silver bullion coin, round, or bar. Just as a whole is more than the sum of its parts, the value of some bullion products is higher than their intrinsic worth, depending on the minting source, age, and rarity.
The U.S. government continued on with this gold tradition by establishing a bimetallic standard in 1792. The bimetallic standard simply stated that every monetary unit in the U.S. had to be backed by either gold or silver. For example, one U.S. dollar was the equivalent of 24.75 grains of gold. In other words, the coins that were used as money simply represented the gold (or silver) that was presently deposited at the bank.
A Silver coin can come in a variety of sizes from 1/25 oz to 1 kilo, and every size in between. There are mints and refiners all over the world that create the best unique and valuable Silver coins. Whether you are a beginning or experienced collector, you will find a coin that fits your interests. The most common purchases are 1 ounce Silver coins, often bought by investors and Silver collectors alike. Some of our most popular Silver coins include:
Investment Grade Coins are higher quality and more rare than bullion coins. These coins are also graded and are enclosed in a protective slab to ensure and preserve the condition of the coin. A study commissioned by the U.S. Congress has proven that certain Investment Grade Coins are shown to have an annual return of 15%. Investment Grade Coins are for investors planning to hold onto their investment for at least 3 years.
Most of the countries that mint gold have a design that stays the same each year. Some vary the designs annually and date the gold coin, such as the Chinese Panda coins. Proof (PF) uncirculated coins are typically more expensive than non-proof gold coins. They require extra time and effort to make and can have a slightly higher value than non-proof because of demand from collectors. However, both contain the same amount of precious metal so investing in proof coins is highly speculative and generally a play on collectible value as opposed to the metal itself.
Traditionally (up to about the 1930s), gold coins have been circulation coins, including coin-like bracteates and dinars. Since recent decades, however, gold coins are mainly produced as bullion coins to investors and as commemorative coins to collectors. While modern gold coins are also legal tender, they are not observed in everyday financial transactions, as the metal value normally exceeds the nominal value. For example, the American Gold Eagle, given a denomination of 50 USD, has a metal value of more than $1,200 USD.

Gold shows typically deal more in numismatic, or collector coins, which have high markups, are illiquid, and are valued based more on rarity or historical significance than gold content. If a dealer does have any bullion, it is likely to be a limited selection. While numismatics can be a good investment, it takes a tremendous amount of research to avoid being taken advantage of by an unscrupulous dealer.

Bullion coin counterfeits (of all types) used to be rare and fairly easy to detect when comparing their weights, colors and sizes to authentic pieces. This is because the cost of reproducing any given coin precisely can exceed the market value of the originals.[16][17][18][19] However, since about 2015 counterfeit coins are "flooding the market at an astonishing rate" and "it's gotten to the point where even people who deal with coins all the time may not be able to recognize a counterfeit coin right away" (American Numismatic Association (ANA), 2016).[20] The coins consist mostly of tungsten plated thinly with gold, have the correct weight, correct or near-correct dimensions and are professionally produced in China.[20][21]


The Government of the Dominion of Canada issues the Canadian Gold Maple Leaf annually, which is produced by the Royal Canadian Mint. As legal tender, the face value is 50 Canadian dollars. The content is 24 karat with a fineness of .9999. The standard Candaian coin weighs 1 troy ounce. Denominations include 1 gram (50 cents), 1/20 oz ($1), 1/10 oz ($5), ¼ ounce ($10) and ½ oz ($20). The obverse features a profile of Queen Elizabeth II of Canada with the Canadian maple leaf on the reverse. As of 2015, the coin also has security features.
A. Since, for one reason or another, it is difficult to take delivery from any of the ETFs, they are generally viewed as a price bet and not actual ownership of the metal. Most gold investors want possession of their gold because they are buying as a hedge against an economic, financial or political disaster. When disaster strikes, it does not do you much good to have your gold stored in some distant facility by a third party. For this reason, over the past couple of years the trend even with hedge fund operators has been away from the ETFs.

Mexican Libertads are highly valued among investors. Often considered the most beautiful coin in the world, these limited-mintage Gold coins are a valuable addition to investor portfolios. Highly traded by people around the world, Gold Mexican Libertad coins are available in graded and Proof versions along with standard BU coins. Sizes also vary, all the way down to 1/20 oz Gold, allowing beginning investors an affordable price point to start their collection or portfolio. Mexican Libertads make the perfect investment opportunity for beginning and advanced investors.
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