No matter what form it’s in, gold and silver have been prized by civilizations across the world for thousands of years. Once a sign of status for the wealthy, today gold is available to all investors in many forms. Gold serves as a wise investment for anyone who wishes to protect against unstable stock markets, currency dilution, and many other untenable conditions.
Thus, even though some bars, coins, and rounds usually command lower premiums over spot, silver coins may warrant a much higher premium because of their collectible value. Also, another reason why coins command a higher premium is – they hold the prestige of being the only government-minted precious metals instruments and thus, enjoy a strong demand in the precious metals market.

Bullion Coins offer investors the intrinsic value of the gold, along with the numismatic value of the actual coins. Coins are produced in world renowned mints such as the US Mint, Royal Canadian Mint, or the People's Republic of China and come in limited mintages, therefore increasing their value. They are also recognized as legal tender, wherein gold bars are not. Bullion coins usually come with a higher premium because they are considered legal tender and they are produced in respected Mints. Depending on where they were minted, some coins come in fractional sizes, along with the typical and most popular, one ounce increment. Gold bullion coins provide investors and collectors a product with value that will always be recognized all over the world.
It is generally accepted that the price of gold is closely related to interest rates. As interest rates rise, the general tendency is for the gold price, which earns no interest, to fall, and vice versa. As a result, the gold price can be closely correlated to central banks[clarification needed] via their monetary policy decisions on interest rates. For example, if market signals indicate the possibility of prolonged inflation, central banks may decide to raise interest rates, which could reduce the price of gold. But this does not always happen: after the European Central Bank raised its interest rate slightly on April 7, 2011, for the first time since 2008,[25] the price of gold drove higher, and hit a new high one day later.[26] Similarly, in August 2011 when interest rates in India were at their highest in two years, the gold prices peaked as well.[27]
If you want a low-cost way to invest in the short-term direction of gold’s price or to employ leverage with options—and you never want or need to take delivery of your metal—bullion ETFs can be ideal. But if the main reason you’re investing in gold is for protection of your financial assets during an economic downturn or “Black Swan” type event, it hardly makes sense to place your trust in the banking system.

Shop for gold bars, gold coins and gold bullion from top refiners and world mints, including the United States Mint, Royal Canadian Mint, Perth Mint, PAMP Suisse, Credit Suisse and more. Buying gold bars and gold coins can help to hedge your financial portfolio against inflation and help to protect your assets from a Stock Market crash. Read more about gold coins, gold bullion and gold bars here

Although governments have decided it's easier to be off the gold standard than on it, that doesn't change the central issue that backs gold's intrinsic value and safe-haven status: There's only so much gold in the world. The gold that's above ground being used in some fashion is estimated to be around 190,000 metric tons. The amount of gold in the ground that can be economically mined today is notably less, at roughly 54,000 metric tons.    
The United States Mint is the sovereign mint of the United States of America and the only one authorized to produce American gold coins. Since 1794, the US Mint has issued both circulation gold currency and bullion gold coinage. From 1794 to 1933, the United States issued circulation gold coins in 22-karat gold (1794-1837) and .900 pure gold content (1838-1933). In 1986, the United States reintroduced gold coinage with gold bullion coins for investment and collection. The following are examples of American gold coins for sale:
A gold bar can also be referred to as bullion or an ingot. These bars are produced from metallic gold by a bar producer that meets the conditions of manufacture. Large bars are made by pouring molten metal into molds known as ingots. Smaller bars, like the 1 ounce gold bar, can be minted or stamped from rolled sheets. The standard gold bar is the Good Delivery bar, which is 400 troy ounces. Central banks hold it as a reserve. The kilobar is 32.15 troy ounces. It is often used for investment and trading because it is more manageable.
Canadian Silver Maple Leaf: First issued in 1988, the Silver Maple Leaf is Canada's official bullion coinage in silver and contains 1 Troy oz of .9999 pure silver. It was the world's first .9999 pure silver bullion coin and remains one of the few issued with this purity level. On the obverse is an effigy of Queen Elizabeth II, while the reverse features the sugar maple leaf design used on all Canadian Maple Leaf coinage.
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