If you are buying gold coins in the U.S., chances are good that you will see American Gold Eagle coins for sale. These gold coins are produced by the U.S. Mint, and are one of the world’s most popular gold bullion coins. One of the nicest things about American Gold Eagle coins is that they are available in numerous weights such as 1/10th ounce, ¼ ounce, ½ ounce and 1 ounce.
A. The short answer is 'When you need it.' Gold, first and foremost, is wealth insurance. You cannot approach it the way you approach stock or real estate investments. Timing is not the real issue. The first question you need to ask yourself is whether or not you believe you need to own gold. If you answer that question in the affirmative, there is no point in delaying your actual purchase, or waiting for a more favorable price which may or may not appear. Cost averaging can be a good strategy. The real goal is to diversify so that your overall wealth is not compromised by economic dangers and uncertainties like the kind generated by the 2008 financial crisis, or those now unfolding in Europe and Japan.
Bullion coins can be bought directly from the government agency or institution that prints the coin, if supplies are available. Most are minted on a limited run, and some run out very quickly. That leaves the secondary market from which to buy gold coins—either coin dealers or private owners. People buy coins for various reasons but the big drivers are investment to profit on changes in precious metal values or for collection. Popular coins include the South African Krugerrand, the Canadian Maple, and the U.S. Gold Eagle coins.
Gold is an element categorized in the metal group; its chemical symbol is Au. It's incredibly soft and malleable. In fact, a single ounce of gold can be beaten into a thin metal sheet as big as 5 square meters. The thickness of such a sheet, which is called gold leaf, would be less than the thickness of a human hair. Gold's malleability is one of the key reasons it's used to make jewelry. It's so soft that it needs to be mixed with other metals to increase its strength so it can stand up to daily use. Gold is also a good conductor, a trait that has been important in more recent human history following the harnessing of electricity. 
Coins in a mint sealed monster box. Date of the mint box is fulfilled on a availability in the warehouse. Each coin is. 999 pure silver, making this one of the finest silver coins ever minted. The obverse side of this large coin features a design based on the earlier “Walking Liberty” coin, while the reverse side features an image of a bald eagle holding a shield beneath 13 stars.
Borrowing money (also known as buying on margin) to make a bigger investment in gold is a risky game. Say, for example, you invest $4,000 and then leverage your investment five-to-one, so that you control $20,000 worth of gold coins or bars in an account set up by a dealer or brokerage firm. To start, the price of gold is volatile, and if the price dips far enough (below the minimum margin requirement), you’ll have to kick in more money to keep your account, or you’ll have to sell some or all of your investment. Also, the salesman’s commission is based on the total amount of the purchase. So he’ll get, say, 5% of the $20,000, or $1,000. Although 5% is a fair commission, it’s 25% of your $4,000 equity stake. On top of that, you’re paying interest on the money borrowed.
The weight and dimensions of a coin of .999 fineness such as the Maple Leaf cannot be replicated precisely by a gold plated tungsten core, since tungsten has only 99.74% of the specific gravity of gold. However, forgeries of alloyed gold coins (such as American gold eagle or Krugerrand made from a crown gold alloy with 22 karats = .917 fineness) may have correct the correct weight and dimensions because of the lesser density of the alloy. Such forgeries can be detected testing the acoustic, electric resistance or magnetic properties. The latter method uses the fact that gold is weakly diamagnetic and tungsten is weakly paramagnetic. The effect is weak so that testing requires strong neodymium magnets and sensitive conditions (e.g., a gold coin hanging from 2 m long pendulum or placed on styrofoam floating on water), such tests can be performed without special equipment.[22] Forgeries using gold plated tungsten are also used in counterfeiting of gold bars.
The mining sector, which includes companies that extract gold, can experience high volatility. When evaluating the dividend performance of gold stocks, consider the company's performance over time in regard to dividends. Factors such as the company's history of paying dividends and the sustainability of its dividend payout ratio are two key elements to examine in the company's balance sheet and other financial statements. A company's ability to sustain healthy dividend payouts is greatly enhanced if it has consistently low debt levels and strong cash flows, and the historical trend of the company's performance shows steadily improving debt and cash flow figures. Since any company goes through growth and expansion cycles when it takes on more debt and has a lower cash on hand balance, it's imperative to analyze their long-term figures rather than a shorter financial picture timeframe.
Answer. Since, for one reason or another, it is difficult to take delivery from any of the ETFs, they are generally viewed as a price bet and not actual ownership of the metal. Most gold investors want possession of their gold because they are buying as a hedge against an economic, financial or political disaster. When disaster strikes, it does not do you much good to have your gold stored in some distant facility by a third party. For this reason, over the past couple of years the trend even with hedge fund operators has been away from the ETFs. In 2011, ETF sales plummeted while purchases of physical coins and bullion for delivery skyrocketed.

The Market Vectors Junior Gold Miners ETF debuted in 2009. This ETF has become quite popular among investors seeking to have indirect access to gold assets. Although similar to the Gold Miners, the Junior Gold Miners focuses on smaller companies involved in an ongoing search for new sources of gold. Because these companies are less established, there is more risk involved.
Reverse designs in the Queen’s Beast Series include 10 different heraldic beasts in all. Launched in 2016 with the Lion of England, other designs include the Red Dragon of Wales, Black Bull of Clarence, and the Unicorn of Scotland. The obverse of each coin features Queen Elizabeth II’s effigy, with all reverse and obverse designs from Jody Clark of the Royal Mint.
Miners begin by finding a place where they believe gold is located in large enough quantities that it can be economically obtained. Then local governments and agencies have to grant the company permission to build and operate a mine. Developing a mine is a dangerous, expensive, and time-consuming process with little to no economic return until the mine is finally operational -- which often takes a decade or more from start to finish. 
The official gold bullion coin of the U.S. is the American Gold Eagle. It was first released by the United States Mint in 1986 after being authorized under the Gold Bullion Coin Act of 1985. The design on the obverse in 1986 was Augustus Saint-Gaudens' depiction of Liberty. It is sold in both proof (most should avoid buying proof coins) and bullion finishes with a rendition of Adolph A. Weinman's Walking Liberty design. The weight of the bullion is usually used to describe Gold Eagle coins. They also have a marked face value, such as ten dollars on the ¼ ounce coin.

Bullion coins sell for a premium over the market price of the metal on the commodities exchanges.[9] Reasons include their comparative small size and the costs associated with manufacture, storage and distribution. The amount of the premium varies depending on the coin's type and weight and the precious metal. The premium also is affected by prevailing demand.
×