The dealers at Dallas Gold and Silver Exchange take tremendous pride in supplying the people of Dallas with the finest quality of coins and bullion. For over thirty years they have grown and expanded their inventory to cater to a broad range of buyers and collectors. From the novice, looking to start buying and collecting, to the most seasoned collectors, seeking to diversify their collections, Dallas Gold and Silver Exchange has something for everyone.

A gold bar can also be referred to as bullion or an ingot. These bars are produced from metallic gold by a bar producer that meets the conditions of manufacture. Large bars are made by pouring molten metal into molds known as ingots. Smaller bars, like the 1 ounce gold bar, can be minted or stamped from rolled sheets. The standard gold bar is the Good Delivery bar, which is 400 troy ounces. Central banks hold it as a reserve. The kilobar is 32.15 troy ounces. It is often used for investment and trading because it is more manageable.
Basically, this is a misunderstanding of what gold bullion is. The common perception is that rectangular bits of gold ("bars") are the most cost effective, and perhaps the only available, form of gold bullion. The same thinking has it that round bits of gold ("coins") are not really gold bullion. There’s a common misperception that "coins" are limited in supply, expensive, and perhaps, to some extent, collectors' items.
The reason gold benefits from a declining U.S. dollar is because gold is priced in U.S. dollars globally. There are two reasons for this relationship. First, investors who are looking at buying gold (i.e., central banks) must sell their U.S. dollars to make this transaction. This ultimately drives the U.S. dollar lower as global investors seek to diversify out of the dollar. The second reason has to do with the fact that a weakening dollar makes gold cheaper for investors who hold other currencies. This results in greater demand from investors who hold currencies that have appreciated relative to the U.S. dollar.
Gold exchange-traded products may include exchange-traded funds (ETFs), exchange-traded notes (ETNs), and closed-end funds (CEFs), which are traded like shares on the major stock exchanges. The first gold ETF, Gold Bullion Securities (ticker symbol "GOLD"), was launched in March 2003 on the Australian Stock Exchange, and originally represented exactly 0.1 troy ounces (3.1 g) of gold. As of November 2010, SPDR Gold Shares is the second-largest exchange-traded fund in the world by market capitalization.[45]
The timing on your gold purchase is a bit more complicated, since you will pay more for gold and gold-related stocks when gold prices are high. That doesn't diminish the diversification benefit over the long term, but high gold prices can mean lackluster returns over the near term. Trying to time your entry point, however, leads to market timing judgment calls that are best avoided by most, if not all, investors.

British Silver Britannia: The official silver bullion coin of Great Britain, the Britannia coinage debuted in 1997 from the Royal Mint of England. It shares the same obverse and reverse designs as the Gold Britannia. On the obverse is a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II, while the reverse features the design of Britannia from Philip Nathan. From 1997 to 2012, the Silver Britannia featured .958 silver purity, but since 2013 it has featured .999 pure silver content.
Gold jewelry: The problem with buying gold jewelry as an investment is that you pay a premium for the craftsmanship and the desirability of the design. Any piece of jewelry marked 14 karat or less will be below investment quality, and any resale for the sake of investing will be impacted by the need to refine the gold. On the other hand, it is possible to pick up antique or vintage gold for very little at estate sales and similar auctions where a seller may not recognize the true value of the metal content or if people simply aren't in the mood to bid much for it. Older pieces can carry more value due to their unique craftsmanship, so this can be a lucrative and enjoyable way to collect gold.
Now that you understand why buying Silver is a good use of your investment dollar, you may need guidance regarding how to buy physical Silver. Luckily, buying physical Silver is easy. If you choose an established, well-regarded Precious Metals company, you can buy with confidence. Buying physical Silver should be an enjoyable part of your investment journey. Consider working with APMEX to experience the thrill of buying physical Silver. For example, you may choose a beautiful 1922 Silver Dollar. The 1922 Silver Dollar has bullion value due to its Silver content, as well as collectible value due to its brief minting.
The Krugerrand is the most widely held gold bullion coin, with 46 million troy ounces (1,400 tonnes) in circulation. Other common gold bullion coins include the Australian Gold Nugget (Kangaroo), Austrian Philharmoniker (Philharmonic), Austrian 100 Corona, Canadian Gold Maple Leaf, Chinese Gold Panda, Malaysian Kijang Emas, French Napoleon or Louis d'Or, Mexican Gold 50 Peso, British Sovereign, American Gold Eagle, and American Buffalo.
If you want more risk, try exchange-traded notes, debt instruments that track an index. You give a bank money for an allotted amount of time and, upon maturity, the bank pays you a return based on the performance of what the ETN is based on, in this case the gold futures market. Some of the more popular ones are UBS Bloomberg CMCI Gold ETN ( UBG), DB Gold Double Short ETN ( DZZ), DB Gold Short ETN ( DGZ) and DB Gold Double Long ETN ( DGP).
Circulation is a term that means the coin was once used in the general public. Any money that you have in your pocket right now is an example of circulated money. Uncirculated money is money that never went out to the public. These gold coins come directly from financial institutions or from the mint. This may refer to collector products, too. Manufacturers design these products specifically for collectors. Many feature iconic people or images such as former American Presidents or historic landmarks on each side. Collectors like these gold eagles because they know that no one ever touched the metal before.
ModernCoinMart® / MCM® is a private distributor of coin and currency issues and privately licensed collectibles, and is not affiliated with the U.S. government. MCM is not an investment company and does not offer financial advice. The collectible coin market is highly speculative and involves risk. You must decide for yourself if you are willing to accept these risks, including the risk that you may not be able to liquidate your purchases at prices acceptable to you. MCM makes every effort to ensure facts, figures and offers are accurate; however, errors may and do occur. MCM reserves the right, within its sole discretion and without prior notice to the consumer, to decline to consummate any sale based on such errors. All facts and figures, and populations of graded, autographed or pedigreed coins, are deemed accurate as of the date of publication, but may change significantly over time. ModernCoinMart, MCM and GovMint.com® are brands of Asset Marketing Services®. All rights reserved ©ModernCoinMart.
A. The short answer is 'When you need it.' Gold, first and foremost, is wealth insurance. You cannot approach it the way you approach stock or real estate investments. Timing is not the real issue. The first question you need to ask yourself is whether or not you believe you need to own gold. If you answer that question in the affirmative, there is no point in delaying your actual purchase, or waiting for a more favorable price which may or may not appear. Cost averaging can be a good strategy. History tells us that panics, mania, crashes and collapses are as common to financial history as thunderstorms to placid summer afternoons. The real goal is to diversify so that your overall wealth is not compromised by economic dangers and uncertainties like the kind generated by the 2008 financial crisis.
The performance of gold bullion is often compared to stocks as different investment vehicles. Gold is regarded by some as a store of value (without growth) whereas stocks are regarded as a return on value (i.e., growth from anticipated real price increase plus dividends). Stocks and bonds perform best in a stable political climate with strong property rights and little turmoil. The attached graph shows the value of Dow Jones Industrial Average divided by the price of an ounce of gold. Since 1800, stocks have consistently gained value in comparison to gold in part because of the stability of the American political system.[56] This appreciation has been cyclical with long periods of stock outperformance followed by long periods of gold outperformance. The Dow Industrials bottomed out a ratio of 1:1 with gold during 1980 (the end of the 1970s bear market) and proceeded to post gains throughout the 1980s and 1990s.[57] The gold price peak of 1980 also coincided with the Soviet Union's invasion of Afghanistan and the threat of the global expansion of communism. The ratio peaked on January 14, 2000 a value of 41.3 and has fallen sharply since.

Bars come in various shapes and sizes and are made by different fabricators or mints from all over the world. Silver bars can offer investors a simple and easy way to accumulate varying amounts of silver in its purest form. Common silver bar sizes include 1 oz, 5 oz, 10 oz, 1 kilogram and 100 oz. Some of the more common producers of these silver bars are Johnson Matthey, OPM Metals, Engelhard, NTR Metals, Sunshine Mint, SilverTowne and the Royal Canadian Mint.


As the collector market for coins grew rapidly in the late 19th century and early 20th century, it became apparent that a more precise grading standard was needed. Some coins were simply more fine than others, and some uncirculated coins showed more luster and far fewer marks than others. Terms like "gem uncirculated" and "very fine" began to see use, as more precise grading descriptions allowed for more precise pricing for the booming collector market. In 1948, a well-known numismatist by the name of Dr. William Sheldon attempted to standardized coin grading by proposing what is now known as the Sheldon Scale.
Foreign governments also mint coins, but they may not be produced to the same standards as U.S. coins and they aren't guaranteed by the U.S. government. The value of foreign bullion coins depends primarily upon the coin's melt value – the basic intrinsic bullion value of a coin if it were melted and sold. A bullion coin's condition – its "grade" – isn't the most relevant factor in determining its price.
Gold coin prices are determined by a variety of different factors, including condition, availability, and composition. Uncirculated coins that have never been handled in the marketplace will typically bring a high price because the condition is unblemished. Accessibility is a factor in Gold coin pricing because if a coin is in short supply, retailers can charge a higher price to collectors. The composition of a particular currency is critical to value since coins made with a more significant percentage of Gold have more melt value.
The idea that gold preserves wealth is even more important in an economic environment where investors are faced with a declining U.S. dollar and rising inflation. Historically, gold has served as a hedge against both of these scenarios. With rising inflation, gold typically appreciates. When investors realize that their money is losing value, they will start positioning their investments in a hard asset that has traditionally maintained its value. The 1970s present a prime example of rising gold prices in the midst of rising inflation.
Owning gold means having a valuable asset to protect your wealth and purchasing power for years to come. Investors invest in or buy gold to help guard against inflation and financial turmoil. Because it is inversely correlated to many other asset classes, it is a necessary part of any balanced investment portfolio. It is more than a commodity… it is a better, more stable form of money that has been used for thousands of years. It’s something everyone should own – from seasoned investors to regular people looking for financial security.
Silver coins are sold at a premium above Silver spot prices because of their unique designs and limited availability. Coins are usually sold in brilliant uncirculated condition, having not been used as actual currency. Once a coin loses its luster, it begins to lose its status in terms of condition. The highest quality Silver bullion coins are known as proof coins. Popular for their intricate designs, proof coins are struck more than once, which leads to their brilliant shine.
Silver was the first metal used as currency more than 4,000 years ago, when Silver ingots were used in trading. When you purchase Silver, you are buying an asset valued since ancient times. Recognized innately by humans as valuable, Silver has always been a viable investment and commodity. But what makes Silver a good investment now? Why is buying physical Silver a good idea today? Let’s examine what makes buying physical Silver a great investment and collecting opportunity.
The two main reasons to invest in bullion coins are to hedge against other market investment forces and to start building future returns. Many gold coin purchases are held for a long-term period versus short trading. This is often so that the investment can recover both value and additional mark ups and commissions charged on coins for sale at the retail level. Even mints charge a markup over the spot price value of a new bullion coin. So some period of wait is needed to let the value appreciate.
Bullion coins are coins made from precious metals with a defined weight and content that are generally used for investment purposes. Bullion itself is the term for bulk precious metal that is cast as bars with a specified weight. Bullion coins are basically a smaller, more affordable version of bullion. Bullion are typically minted in weights that are fractions of one troy ounce to fit a variety of budgets. Bullion coins are usually made from gold and silver, but they are also be available in platinum and palladium. Many countries have their own official bullion coins, such as the American Eagle series of coins available from the United States Mint, and the Canadian Maple Leaf series offered by the Royal Canadian Mint.
If you buy gold for the right reason – as a long-term savings vehicle – then you want to buy the best-known bullion products for the lowest possible prices. Fortunately, the best-known products are usually the best-priced options. They are relatively common and their value is determined by their weight, not erstwhile values like rareness or collectibility.
Purchase gold coins online as well as silver coins with Golden Eagle. We offer gold coins & gold bars with competitive prices. It is simple to buy gold with Golden Eagle Coins. We specialize in a wide variety of gold bullion coins and other gold bullion products. Our large inventory caters to both the gold bullion investor as well as the collector.
To compete with the purer Maple Leaf, the U.S. Mint introduced a new gold bullion coin, the American Buffalo, in 2006. Its 24 karats represent the purest coin ever offered by the U.S. Mint. But it’s not bought and sold as frequently as the American Eagle, and it’s more expensive. “In general, most people don’t know about the American Buffalo,” Mladjenovic says.
If you store your gold at home, invest in a decent safe. Practice good "safe hygiene." Bolt it to the floor out of sight of windows. Don't leave the combination on a Post-It note on the side of the safe. A reasonably large, fire-resistant safe will cost less than an ounce of gold (at recent prices) and can also be used to store important documents.
Of all the precious metals, gold is the most popular as an investment.[1] Investors generally buy gold as a way of diversifying risk, especially through the use of futures contracts and derivatives. The gold market is subject to speculation and volatility as are other markets. Compared to other precious metals used for investment, gold has the most effective safe haven and hedging properties across a number of countries.[2]
The Gold price fluctuates daily. It moves separately from the stock market and other money markets. Several factors can affect the Gold coin price such as elections, geopolitical volatility, shifts within the stock market and even the threat of a possible recession, just to name a few. All of these factors affect the price of Precious Metals, which is extremely important when buying Gold bullion.

When it comes to purchasing or selling bullion, the market value for gold (also referred to as "spot price") is the basis for all pricing. Almost all products on SD Bullion operate on a spot price plus the product premium (also referred to as "over spot") formula to determine the final price. For example, if the market value for gold is X and the product premium is Y, the final price would be X+Y=Z. Premium pricing is mostly consistent per product but the market value for silver changes vastly on a minute by minute basis. Our market feed integrates live up to the minute market prices from worldwide markets. We offer both live and historical gold prices available on our website's Live Market Prices page. You can customize charts to research and find trends in pricing and compare to other precious metal types.


And finally, for those who want the finest investment-grade gold bullion bars available, we proudly offer the exclusive Monex-certified 10-ounce gold bullion ingot...composed of pure .9999 (or "four-nines") fine gold bullion—among the purest gold bullion bars available to investors today. Each bar is certified, with its weight and purity guaranteed by Monex, and each bar is further hallmarked by Heraeus, one of the world's leading refiners, and the 800 year-old Austrian Mint, one of the world's leading minting institutions.
A Silver coin can come in a variety of sizes from 1/25 oz to 1 kilo, and every size in between. There are mints and refiners all over the world that create the best unique and valuable Silver coins. Whether you are a beginning or experienced collector, you will find a coin that fits your interests. The most common purchases are 1 ounce Silver coins, often bought by investors and Silver collectors alike. Some of our most popular Silver coins include:
Why sell bullion coins? At some point they will appreciate enough to represent a very attractive source of income. This can boost savings in gold accounts like a precious metals IRA, or offset an investment loss elsewhere. The trick to selling is to get a fair to good price. Trying to win a major sale of the year likely won’t happen, but good sales happen regularly. Research and watching spot market pricing of precious metals is the first step, and selling to reliable buyers is the second. Scottsdale Bullion and Coin, for example, will purchase gold bullion coins at very fair prices, making it a good source to sell gold and silver coins. It is possible to sell privately, but always make sure to get paid first before releasing a coin. And don’t trust credit card payments unless you are protected from chargebacks. Many scammers buy a coin and then claim to their credit card company it was never delivered. The charge gets reversed, and the seller is then out both the coin and the payment.

The best time to invest in gold is when inflation is expected to take hold and force down the value of the national currency. The earlier you can detect such drops, the more room you have to make a profit. Leading indicators such as stock market declines and political turmoil may indicate a future devaluation of your country’s currency. Announcements by reserve banks to print out more local currency can also indicate a good time to invest in gold.
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The price of gold bullion is volatile, but unhedged gold shares and funds are regarded as even higher risk and even more volatile. This additional volatility is due to the inherent leverage in the mining sector. For example, if one owns a share in a gold mine where the costs of production are $300 per ounce and the price of gold is $600, the mine's profit margin will be $300. A 10% increase in the gold price to $660 per ounce will push that margin up to $360, which represents a 20% increase in the mine's profitability, and possibly a 20% increase in the share price. Furthermore, at higher prices, more ounces of gold become economically viable to mine, enabling companies to add to their production. Conversely, share movements also amplify falls in the gold price. For example, a 10% fall in the gold price to $540 will decrease that margin to $240, which represents a 20% fall in the mine's profitability, and possibly a 20% decrease in the share price.
DGSE.com allows customers of Dallas Gold and Silver the opportunity to view what products are currently available for purchase, physically make those purchases and have them delivered. The website also offers an up to date ticker of market precious metal prices. Customers can be up to the minute aware of what gold, silver and other precious metals are worth.
In the United States, the avoirdupois measure of weights is used when weighing everything except precious metals, gems, and drugs. For precious metals, such as silver, the troy weight system is used. The standard avoirdupois ounce contains 28.35 grams, while the troy measure is a bit heavier, with 31.1 grams. The weight difference might seem almost negligible, but when weighing even small amounts of precious metals, this difference can have a significant impact. It's definitely important to make sure that the right unit of measurement is being used.
Although central banks do not generally announce gold purchases in advance, some, such as Russia, have expressed interest in growing their gold reserves again as of late 2005.[22] In early 2006, China, which only holds 1.3% of its reserves in gold,[23] announced that it was looking for ways to improve the returns on its official reserves. Some bulls hope that this signals that China might reposition more of its holdings into gold, in line with other central banks. Chinese investors began pursuing investment in gold as an alternative to investment in the Euro after the beginning of the Eurozone crisis in 2011. China has since become the world’s top gold consumer as of 2013.[24]
Many investors spend time deciding whether to buy gold or buy silver, however the savviest investors own both. Whereas gold could offer the ultimate insurance and protection against uncertain economic times, silver is a more speculative investment. Despite gold and silver both being commonly invested precious metals, silver is an entirely different investment which can realise substantial profits despite the initial VAT outlay. It’s because of these differences that owning both gold and silver together can be of benefit.
New investors will find great comfort and emotional attachment from buying Silver coins. You can expect to pay more for a Silver coin than its Silver bullion counterparts, but because of the coin’s scarcity and collectibility, you’ll have a more fulfilling buying experience. There is almost an unlimited variety of Silver coins for your investing pleasure.
Since the price of gold tends to be dramatically cyclical, subject to many factors involving supply and demand, it can be quite difficult to valuate gold in an environment of constantly depreciating paper currencies. One way to valuate gold is to compare it to the price of stocks, which tends to be more stable. The Dow/gold ratio is the Dow Jones Industrial Average relative to gold's price per ounce (or how many ounces of gold the Dow can buy). A high Dow/gold ratio means stocks are overpriced and gold is cheap, while a low Dow/gold ratio means gold is overpriced and stocks are cheap. One should consider buying stocks and selling gold when the Dow/gold ratio falls well below the historic trend-line (which has recently averaged about 20 or higher). Conversely, one might consider selling stocks and buying gold when the Dow/gold ratio is significantly above the historic trend-line.
Some people out there appreciate the true beauty of a beautifully minted silver coin. Take the coins from the famous American Silver Eagle program for example, with obverses featuring Weinman’s beautiful Walking Liberty and the reverses depicting Mercanti’s rendition of a Bald Eagle and a shield, a symbol of American strength and pride. Collectors buy these products for their ‘artistic’ or ‘collectible’ value rather than their melt value. For them, there is no right or wrong; they should pick the products that they consider aesthetically appealing.

A. Gold's baseline, essential quality is its role as the only primary asset that is not someone else's liability. That separates gold from the majority of capital assets which in fact do rely on another's ability to pay, like bonds and bank savings, or the performance of the management, or some other delimiting factor, as is the case with stocks. The first chapter of the ABCs of Gold Investing ends with this: "No matter what happens in this country, with the dollar, with the stock and bond markets, the gold owner will find a friend in the yellow metal -- something to rely upon when the chips are down. In gold, investors will find a vehicle to protect their wealth. Gold is bedrock."
American Gold Eagle: The American Gold Eagle coin is the official gold bullion coin from the United States, and the coins debuted in 1986. Each Gold Eagle features 22-karat gold for both bullion, proof, and burnished coins. The bullion and proof coins include 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, and 1/10 oz coins, while the burnished coin has just a 1 oz option. All coins feature Lady Liberty from Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ 1907 design on the obverse, with Miley Busiek’s family of bald eagles on the reverse.
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