Even those investors focused primarily on growth rather than steady income can benefit from choosing gold stocks that demonstrate historically strong dividend performance. Stocks that pay dividends tend to show higher gains when the sector is rising and fare better – on average, nearly twice as well – than non-dividend-paying stocks when the overall sector is in a downturn.
Gold is the most popular of the investment precious metals, opposed to silver, platinum and palladium. However, when priced in dollars, it can appear volatile, although not usually as much as silver. From 2005 to 2011, both gold and silver increased dramatically in value, even more rapidly than the dollar’s purchasing power fell. In addition, its historic role as money, silver is essential in many industries, means there is always a need for it. Conversely, gold has limited industrial use and – other than its role as a core investment asset – it is associated with luxury purchases, such as jewelry.
The Krugerrand gold coin was first minted in South Africa in 1967 and was produced by the South African Mint. By 1980, this gold coin accounted for 90 percent of the global coin market. Kruger is the man featured on the obverse and rand refers to the South African unit of currency. Production levels of the Krugerrand have varied over the past half century. They went down in the years associated with the apartheid government and are increasing again.
The most basic definition of a mint is an industrial facility that manufactures rounds, bars, or coins. Gold bullion mints produce coins that are used for both currency and investment purposes. It is believed the first mint was established in the 7th century BC in Lydia. The mint coined gold and silver. Leading bullion mints worldwide include the United States Mint, the Royal Canadian Mint, and the Perth Mint in Australia.
Precious metal prices can be volatile and the value of your metal may go down as well as up. No responsibility can be accepted by Jewellery Quarter Bullion Limited for any loss caused by acting on information we have provided. We do not offer investment or tax advice and recommend that you conduct your own independent research before making any investment decisions.
Answer. We probably get that question more than any other -- pretty much on a daily basis. The answer, however, is not as straightforward as you might think. What you buy depends upon your goals. We usually answer the "What should I buy?" question with one of our own: "Why are you interested in buying gold?" If your goal is simply to hedge financial uncertainty and/or capitalize on price movement, then contemporary bullion coins will serve your purposes. Those concerned with the possibility of capital controls and a gold seizure, or call-in, often include historic pre-1933 gold coins in the mix. Both categories carry modest premiums over their gold melt value, track the gold price, and enjoy strong liquidity internationally.
American Gold Eagle: The American Gold Eagle coin is the official gold bullion coin from the United States, and the coins debuted in 1986. Each Gold Eagle features 22-karat gold for both bullion, proof, and burnished coins. The bullion and proof coins include 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, and 1/10 oz coins, while the burnished coin has just a 1 oz option. All coins feature Lady Liberty from Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ 1907 design on the obverse, with Miley Busiek’s family of bald eagles on the reverse.
A coin or bar dealer will not buy gold from you at the spot price, as they have to factor in their business overheads. They also have to consider the chance that the bar or coin is not what they think it is. Some rarer coins might be quoted at prices above spot, but in gold bullion products like small bars, Sovereigns or Krugerrands, this usually results in you receiving 2-5% less than the spot price when you come to sell.
Gold prices vary each day. Investors may check MoneyMetals.com to see the live global price of precious metals at any given time. As a general matter, the global metals market is open around the clock on Monday through Friday.  You can reference price charts which display both historic and live data in various currencies such as U.S. dollars, euros, British pounds, Australian dollars, Canadian dollars, and others. Live prices can change in just seconds. It is important to check prices in real time before buying or selling bullion.
A. Traditionally, wealthy, aristocratic European and Asian families have kept a strong percentage of their assets in gold as a protective factor. The long term economic picture for the United States has changed enormously over the past several years. As a result, that same philosophy has taken hold here particularly among those interested in preserving their wealth both for themselves and for their families from one generation to the next. In recent years, we have helped a good many family trusts diversify with gold coins and bullion at the advice of their portfolio managers.
But this gold standard did not last forever. During the 1900s, there were several key events that eventually led to the transition of gold out of the monetary system. In 1913, the Federal Reserve was created and started issuing promissory notes (the present day version of our paper money) that could be redeemed in gold on demand. The Gold Reserve Act of 1934 gave the U.S. government title to all the gold coins in circulation and put an end to the minting of any new gold coins. In short, this act began establishing the idea that gold or gold coins were no longer necessary in serving as money. The U.S. abandoned the gold standard in 1971 when its currency ceased to be backed by gold.
False Claims – Unscrupulous sellers often overprice their coins, lie about the bullion content, or try to pass off ordinary bullion coins as rare collectible coins. Some fraudulent dealers may even try to sell coins that aren't bullion coins at all. Others may try to sell bullion pieces with the same design as coins from the U.S. Mint, but in different sizes. Indeed, private mints issue coins that look like bullion coins minted by foreign governments, but may have little or no gold content. Your best defense is to study the market and choose your dealer carefully.
Each year the Royal Canadian Mint produces the Canadian Gold Maple Leaf bullion coin that is issued by the Government of the Dominion of Canada. The standard gold Royal Canadian Mint coins weighs one troy ounce with a face value of $50 Canadian dollars. It is one of the purest gold coins in the world at .99999 millesimal fineness. Other sizes frequently sold inMaple Leaf Coins to investors include 1 gram, 1/25 oz, 1/20 oz, 1/10 oz and ½ oz. The obverse features a profile of Queen Elizabeth II of Canada with the Canadian Maple Leaf on the reverse. Security features were introduced in 2013 and 2015 that are only visible under magnification.
A. The same vetting rules outlined earlier apply. Check them out. Too often investors make the mistake of believing that the gold firm that sponsors their favorite political commentator is also the best place to make their gold purchases. National media campaigns are expensive and those costs are usually covered in the prices paid by investors for their gold coins. In some instances that mark-up can be twice the gold value. Take care that you are not paying too much for your gold and that you are buying the gold items best suited to meeting your goals.
They also sell gold bars and metalor gold bars in one ounce and ten ounce weights. US Bullion also deals in a range of silver products. Such include the American Silver Eagle, silver bars in a variety of weights and bags of silver coins from 1965 to 1969 and before. By opening an account with US Bullion on their website ordering their quality products is quick and easy.
The idea that gold preserves wealth is even more important in an economic environment where investors are faced with a declining U.S. dollar and rising inflation. Historically, gold has served as a hedge against both of these scenarios. With rising inflation, gold typically appreciates. When investors realize that their money is losing value, they will start positioning their investments in a hard asset that has traditionally maintained its value. The 1970s present a prime example of rising gold prices in the midst of rising inflation.
*The information contained on sbcgold.com has been prepared by Scottsdale Bullion & Coin for informational purposes only. It is not intended to provide, and should not be relied upon for; investment, legal, accounting or tax advice. Please consult with a professional who may specialize in these areas regarding the applicability of this information to your individual situation. The trademarks and registered trademarks are property of their respective owners.

When looking for an American gold eagle, you'll come across some certified bullion. This means that an organization with a strong professional reputation rated the coin as authentic. Investors look for those certified by the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation or the Professional Coin Grading Service. Both organizations guarantee that the product is authentic and that it contains the right mixture of metals. These organizations also assign a numeric rating to the American Eagles and similar designs based on its value and condition.


In the early 1970s, one ounce of gold equaled $35. Let's say that at that time, you had a choice of either holding an ounce of gold or simply keeping the $35. They would both buy you the same things, like a brand new business suit or fancy bicycle. However, if you had an ounce of gold today and converted it for today's prices, it would still be enough to buy a brand new suit, but the same cannot be said for the $35. In short, you would have lost a substantial amount of your wealth if you decided to hold the $35 as opposed to the one ounce of gold because the value of gold has increased, while the value of a dollar has been eroded by inflation.

If you want more risk, try exchange-traded notes, debt instruments that track an index. You give a bank money for an allotted amount of time and, upon maturity, the bank pays you a return based on the performance of what the ETN is based on, in this case the gold futures market. Some of the more popular ones are UBS Bloomberg CMCI Gold ETN ( UBG), DB Gold Double Short ETN ( DZZ), DB Gold Short ETN ( DGZ) and DB Gold Double Long ETN ( DGP).


Another popular means of adding numismatic value to silver bullion coins is the application of a colorized lacquer. This too is typically applied only to the primary design of a coin on one side. For example, Colorized American Silver Eagle Coins feature brilliant hues and the red, white, and blue of the American flag on the image of Walking Liberty. The colorized lacquer does not change the weight of the coin, nor does it impact the silver content in any way. It is simply a means of adding a collectible twist to popular silver bullion coins.
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