Silver was the first metal used as currency more than 4,000 years ago, when Silver ingots were used in trading. When you purchase Silver, you are buying an asset valued since ancient times. Recognized innately by humans as valuable, Silver has always been a viable investment and commodity. But what makes Silver a good investment now? Why is buying physical Silver a good idea today? Let’s examine what makes buying physical Silver a great investment and collecting opportunity.
But transparency is important. The modern world has audited accounts, and open exchanges, and 'public' companies for a good reason: because previous generations understood that when investment stops being open and transparent, and reverts to cosy secret deals, complex contracts, and big executive bonuses, then it is general investors who get cheated. Transparency helps stop these problems developing.

Obverse features the image of Winged Victory, a symbol of Mexican resistance to Spanish colonial control. Winged Victory is inspired by the same Goddess of Liberty as America’s symbol of Lady Liberty, but features a crown wreath in one hand and broken chains in the other. The background includes the twin volcanic peaks of Popocatepetl and Iztaccihuatl.
Investing in gold coins from exotic, unknown mints can be a risky choice. Grading, purity, and other factors determine the value of gold coins – but investors must take great care when sinking money into the illiquid and opaque collectible market. Coins that are supposedly worth way more than their actual melt value should be avoided by everyone but experienced collectors.
Silver is not only used in modern industry, but is also bought and accumulated for investment purposes. In fact, it has been used for this purpose for over 5000 years now. Silver and other precious metals, such as gold and platinum, are considered a store of value. Silver has been used in currencies for a very long time, as well. It was first used as a form of currency all the way back in 700 B.C. From the ancient Greeks, to the ancient Romans, to the British, silver has been part of currency trading for ages.

If you’re investing in gold, remember that it’s a commodity, and it’s up to you to make sure you’re not overpaying. The day you buy, check the spot price of gold (available at many Web sites, such as www.goldprice.org). Don’t pay more than a 5% to 8% markup over the spot price -- that’s the typical premium, according to Michael White, spokesman for the U.S. Mint.
The list of metal refineries the U.S. Gold Bureau offers products from is staggering. Regardless of what your favorite mint is, you should be able to find multiple different sized gold bars from them on our site; plus our catalog is expanding all the time. Find bars distributed by ITB or International Trade Bullion, a company from the Southwest United States. ITB works hand-in-hand with the U.S. Gold Bureau to provide thoroughly refined metals using modern quality control and advanced refining methods. We also offer bars from a number of international mints such as the Australia's Perth Mint and the Royal Canadian Mint.

Gold is the most popular of the investment precious metals, opposed to silver, platinum and palladium. However, when priced in dollars, it can appear volatile, although not usually as much as silver. From 2005 to 2011, both gold and silver increased dramatically in value, even more rapidly than the dollar’s purchasing power fell. In addition, its historic role as money, silver is essential in many industries, means there is always a need for it. Conversely, gold has limited industrial use and – other than its role as a core investment asset – it is associated with luxury purchases, such as jewelry.
For centuries, buying gold has been recognized as one of the best ways to preserve one's wealth and purchasing power. Gold is a unique investment, one that has served mankind well for thousands of years. From the times of ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans to more modern times, man has been fascinated with the beauty and magic of gold, and with its power to change men's lives.
That’s why Mladjenovic prefers gold bullion coins. The price of the 1-ounce, 24-karat Maple Leaf approximately matches gold’s spot price and enjoyed a meteoric rise between 2005 and 2011, when the price of gold more than quadrupled. But what goes up sometimes comes down: The price of gold coins has tracked the recent decline in the price of gold, as well.
Once you have collected a number of silver and gold coins, it is important to know how to store them properly. Generally speaking, silver and gold pieces need to be handled with gloves to protect the surface from oils on your skin. Slabbing gold and silver coins in hard, non-PVC plastics is the safest way to preserve rare pieces of your collection. As an added layer of protection, store your most valuable Liberty pieces in a lock box to prevent damage and theft. This can be a safe, a locking storage area, or even a safety deposit box.

As alluded to above, investors often make the mistake of buying so-called rare coins. These numismatic or semi-numismatic coins are meant for collectors, speculators, and hobbyists rather than people looking to reliably preserve and build wealth. Rare coin buying is exceedingly risky and often buyers pay inordinately high premiums and do not recoup their value. Rare coins are not really a gold investment… they are more akin to artwork. Some collectors buy coins for pleasure, because of their history or beauty, or because they have excess money to tie up in illiquid assets. Gold coins that are priced close to their actual melt value is a more prudent way to invest in precious metals.
After investing in bullion instruments, it is important to store them safely and efficiently, and this is where the stackability factor comes into play. Value per square inch is most definitely an aspect worth considering when buying bulk quantities of silver. Bullion bars are easily the most stackable and store-able precious metals product, offering substantially more amounts of silver per square inch. Silver coins and rounds require casings, tubes, or boxes when storing large numbers, making them an unwieldy option for massive quantities of silver.

You also have to consider what you will do with the gold you buy in this scenario, which could mean buying a safe or paying for a bank safe deposit box. It's a perfectly fine way to own gold, if that's your goal, but it isn't the best way to invest in gold. And to fully benefit from the portfolio diversification gold offers, you'll need to rebalance your portfolio every so often as you take advantage of investors rushing to gold because it is viewed as a safe haven. 
This listing is for one 1854 $3 Indian princess head gold coin. This coin is in great condition for its age and use in my personal opinion. It does look like the coin was in circulation it has dings and scratches and marks on the coin. Plus the coin tested as gold like it should on the x-ray gun. The container it is currently in lists this item as $3 1854 coin. It looks like it has been sitting like this until I removed the item for pictures since 10/1/64. I am no coin expert I only put down what information I have and what I can find. So please check out the pictures and feel free to ask questions. I am starting the bidding low and letting it run.
Gold coins are produced at a mint by two dies that strike a blank piece of metal with great force. One die as the obverse (front) design for the coin and the other has the reverse (back) design. Proof coins are struck two times or more by the die, while bullion coins are struck once. Gold bullion coins usually have a fineness of .999, which is 24 karats.

Miners begin by finding a place where they believe gold is located in large enough quantities that it can be economically obtained. Then local governments and agencies have to grant the company permission to build and operate a mine. Developing a mine is a dangerous, expensive, and time-consuming process with little to no economic return until the mine is finally operational -- which often takes a decade or more from start to finish. 
As you would have probably figured out by now, all forms of gold bullion products have their purpose in an investment portfolio. Hence, a safe and recommended strategy is to allocate a specific ratio (depending on you or the advice of your investment advisor) of every type of gold bullion instrument in your tangible assets. However, it is an entirely personal decision that one must take after careful deliberation.
The price of gold fluctuates constantly in the markets. This can make pricing gold bars somewhat challenging for many dealers. But we’ve created a system that updates the prices of our products in real time in accordance with the spot price of gold at the time of purchase. We also have a price match guarantee to match the advertised price of any of our products on the sites of our top competitors.
The thing is, gold and stocks don't always do the same thing at the same time. For example, when the stock market is doing well, gold often lags behind. And since the market has a long history of heading higher over time, owning gold as your only investment would clearly be a risky proposition. But the interplay between stocks and gold is where gold's value lies for investors -- and why it can be a safe investment if you use it properly.

Though this interview will help you start safely on the road to gold ownership, it is just an overview. If you would like more detailed information, I would recommend my book, The ABCs of Gold Investing: How to Protect and Build Your Wealth With Gold which covers the who, what, when, where, why and how of gold ownership in detail. You can also shortcut the learning curve by contacting our offices and asking to speak with one of our expert client advisors who will be happy to answer your questions and help you get off to a solid start.

Then there's the question of how to own it, which is equally complicated, with coins and bullion, ETFs, mutual funds, miners, and streaming companies among the various investment options. However, if you take some time to get to know gold and the different ways in which you can get exposure to the metal, I think you'll find that it isn't as risky as some people think and deserves a small place in your otherwise diversified portfolio.
Another popular means of adding numismatic value to silver bullion coins is the application of a colorized lacquer. This too is typically applied only to the primary design of a coin on one side. For example, Colorized American Silver Eagle Coins feature brilliant hues and the red, white, and blue of the American flag on the image of Walking Liberty. The colorized lacquer does not change the weight of the coin, nor does it impact the silver content in any way. It is simply a means of adding a collectible twist to popular silver bullion coins.
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