Gold certificates are usually for unallocated gold, which means there's no specific gold associated with the certificate even though the company says it has enough gold to back all outstanding certificates. You can buy allocated gold certificates, where the certificates represent specific gold bullion, but the costs are higher. The big problem here is that the certificates are really only as good as the company backing them, sort of like banks before FDIC insurance was created. This is why one of the most desirable options for gold certificates is the Perth Mint, which is backed by the government of Western Australia. That said, if you are going to simply buy a paper representation of gold, you might want to consider exchange-traded funds instead. 
Foreign governments also mint coins, but they may not be produced to the same standards as U.S. coins and they aren't guaranteed by the U.S. government. The value of foreign bullion coins depends primarily upon the coin's melt value – the basic intrinsic bullion value of a coin if it were melted and sold. A bullion coin's condition – its "grade" – isn't the most relevant factor in determining its price.
But if you don't actually make use of them, these bars can be costly to liquidate once removed from storage. You may encounter assay, refining, or just handling fees in trying to liquidate that size gold bullion bar. It's much more difficult and time-consuming to liquidate gold bullion in a single chunk that is worth over $100,000 than it is to sell the same amount of gold bullion in more convenient and tradable sizes.

For example, gold can be a volatile investment, so you shouldn't put 100% of your assets into a gold investment. The real benefit, for new and experienced investors alike, comes from the diversification that gold can offer; investors often buy gold when stock prices are falling in an attempt to protect their assets. Adding a small amount of gold to your portfolio can materially increase diversification. Although that percentage is up to you, going above 10% would probably be too much exposure unless you have a very strong conviction about the market's future direction.


Without question, the South African Gold Krugerrand is the most widely known gold coin in the world. The first bullion coin introduced for private investment, the Gold Krugerrand arrived from the South African Mint in 1967. For more than a decade, the Krugerrand was the only gold coin available to private buyers and has survived a Western economic boycott and the end of apartheid to remain a worldwide symbol of South African gold. The Gold Krugerrand features the following designs:
Though this interview will help you start safely on the road to gold ownership, it is just an overview. If you would like more detailed information, I would recommend my book, The ABCs of Gold Investing: How to Protect and Build Your Wealth With Gold which covers the who, what, when, where, why and how of gold ownership in detail. You can also shortcut the learning curve by contacting our offices and asking to speak with one of our expert client advisors who will be happy to answer your questions and help you get off to a solid start.
The grading standards are different in different countries. The main standards applied outside the United States are presented in the following table.[11] Coin grading is not an exact science. It is a subjective exercise and depends on the qualification and the experience of the appraiser. Industry leaders were extremely concerned that without a standardized grading system, the rare coin industry could face enormous problems. Therefore, on February 3, 1986, the Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) was formed and in 1987 the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation. Both associations have the same goal of grading coins. Other prominent grading organizations are the American Numismatic Association Certification Service (ANACS) and the Independent Coin Graders. The grading is usually done by three independent appraisers. A grading finalizer assigns the final grade of the coin and thereafter the coin is sonically sealed in a protective, inert plastic holder known as "slab".[7] Other associations followed and are at present active.[12] This third-party appraisal of a coin's physical condition, backed by a guarantee, and a national network of reputable coin dealers provided an extremely reliable form of protection for rare coin consumers who could then participate in the coin market with greater confidence.
Following the advent of gold as money, its importance continued to grow throughout Europe and the U.K., with relics from the Greek and Roman empires prominently displayed in museums around the world, and Great Britain developing its own metals-based currency in 1066. The British pound (symbolizing a pound of sterling silver), shillings and pence were all based on the amount of gold (or silver) that it represented. Eventually, gold symbolized wealth throughout Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas.

Karat weight (K or kt) is a traditional fraction-based system used to denote the fineness of gold, with one karat being equal to 1/24 part of pure gold in an alloy. With the precision of modern assaying techniques, however, the fineness of gold ingots and bullion is more likely to appear as a decimal measurement. In this system, pure gold would be denoted as 1.000 fine. However, since absolutely pure gold is very soft and therefore not suitable for coinage or ingots, it is generally accepted worldwide that anything above .999 fine qualifies as 24K. Below is a karat weight to fineness conversion chart.
Gold and gold bullion come in various forms. An investor can buy bars, coins, and rounds in almost any size and quantity. Buyers typically get a discount for buying in large quantities or bulk. The yellow metal is produced by mints in various sizes, shapes, and weights. It can be purchased from a local merchant or you can order online from a reputable dealer like Money Metals Exchange. Most buyers opt for the security, convenience, and safety of buying from respected online dealers because they frequently have the best prices and usually are not required to charge sales taxes.
In the early 1970s, one ounce of gold equaled $35. Let's say that at that time, you had a choice of either holding an ounce of gold or simply keeping the $35. They would both buy you the same things, like a brand new business suit or fancy bicycle. However, if you had an ounce of gold today and converted it for today's prices, it would still be enough to buy a brand new suit, but the same cannot be said for the $35. In short, you would have lost a substantial amount of your wealth if you decided to hold the $35 as opposed to the one ounce of gold because the value of gold has increased, while the value of a dollar has been eroded by inflation.
Goldline recommends reviewing its Account Agreement, State Addendum and risk disclosure booklet, Coin Facts for Investors and Collectors to Consider, prior to making your purchase. Precious metals and rare coins can increase or decrease in value. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. We believe that precious metals are a long term investment, recognizing any specific holding period may be affected by current market conditions requiring a longer or shorter holding period.

Gold bullion coins come in several different sizes, providing a diverse selection. Investors of all levels can find value in Gold coins, as well as Gold bars and rounds. Whether you are buying bullion for an investment, adding to a collection, or simply hedging the market, what Gold you buy plays a major role within your portfolio, especially understanding the value of your purchase. Shop Gold bullion coins and rounds today.

A bullion coin is a coin struck from precious metal and kept as a store of value or an investment, rather than used in day-to-day commerce.[1] A bullion coin is distinguished by an explicit statement of weight (or mass) and fineness on the coin; this is because the weight and composition of coins intended for legal tender is specified in the coinage laws of the issuing nation, and therefore there is no need for an explicit statement on the coins themselves. The United Kingdom defines investment coins more specifically as coins that have been minted after 1800, have a purity of not less than 900 thousandths and are, or have been, legal tender in their country of origin.[2] Under United States law, "coins" that fail the last of these requirements are not coins at all,[3] and must be advertised as "rounds" instead. Bullion coins are usually available in both gold and silver[citation needed], with the exceptions of the Krugerrand[4] (note in 2017 the first silver Krugerrand was minted[5]) and the Swiss Vreneli which are only available in gold. The American Eagle and Canadian Gold Maple Leaf series are available in gold, silver and platinum, and palladium.[6][7]
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