Buying Gold bars is one of the most cost-effective, safest and easiest ways to own physical Gold. Gold bars generally match sovereign coins in content and purity, but cost less over Gold spot price than Gold coins because they’re usually minted privately. APMEX sells Gold bars produced by Heraeus, Credit Suisse, Valcambi, Perth Mint and other respected Gold companies. Each Gold bar is stamped with its exact Gold weight, fineness and a serial number for added security.

Fidelitrade: (DE) 302-762-6200. You must open an individual Fidelitrade account. The markup is 4.8%. Buying 100 ounces or more gives you a discount of $1.25 to $1.50 per ounce. The company also charges a commission. Buy up to $15,000 worth and the commission is 1%; for $15,000 to $50,000 it’s 0.75%; for $50,000 and up it’s 0.5%. The company also charges shipping and handling, which is $35 plus $2.25 per ounce of gold.
Every ounce of gold is basically the same as every other ounce. There is no way for a company to create unique value in the gold it produces. And, as such, gold is a commodity that trades based on supply and demand. Physical gold is usually traded in the form of bullion, which is simply a gold bar or coin stamped with the amount of gold it contains and the gold's purity. (Bullion is different than numismatic coins, which are collectibles that often trade based on demand for the specific type of coin and not on their gold content.)    
As far as pricing, gold bars are a cheaper alternative to gold coins which will carry higher premiums depending on the country of their origin. Manufacturers can come from a variety of countries with the most popular being Switzerland, United States, Canada & Australia. Normally gold bars are at least .999 fine and most reputable producers of gold bars will encase them in a certificate card with a matching serial number on the bar as well as the card. These certificates will contain not only the serial number but the weight and purity.
The 1 Troy oz gold bar is the most common size traded around the world. Even countries that use the metric system still produce bars (and coins) in the 1 Troy oz size, since it is so popular. In the gold business, if someone just says “gold bar,” they are probably referring to the 1 Troy oz size. While we’re on the subject, don’t confuse a Troy ounce (the unit of measure used for precious metals) with the avoirdupois ounce (like your local grocery store or bathroom scale might use). A Troy ounce is “heavier” than an avoirdupois ounce. There are 31.1 grams in a Troy ounce, but only 28.35 grams in a “regular” avoirdupois ounce. This bar is about the same size as a military dog-tag, but a bit thicker.

So it should be pretty clear at this point that gold in and of itself can be a risky investment. But if you use gold appropriately, it can provide an offset to other assets that aren't performing well. And the interplay between gold and those other assets is what helps to create diversified portfolios. No, don't invest 100% of your saving into gold in any form. Yes, consider adding a small allotment of gold to your portfolio. But how should you invest in the metal?


From gold exchange-traded funds (ETFs) to gold stocks and buying physical gold, investors now have several different options when it comes to investing in the royal metal. But what exactly is the purpose of gold? And why should investors even bother investing in the gold market? Indeed, these two questions have divided gold investors for the last several decades. One school of thought argues that gold is simply a barbaric relic that no longer holds the monetary qualities of the past. In a modern economic environment, where paper currency is the money of choice, gold's only benefit is the fact that it is a material that is used in jewelry.


A gold coin is made predominantly of gold. Bullion coins are used for investment purposes. Other gold coins for sale are meant to be sold to collectors. Bullion coins are valued based on the gold content while collectible coins may have numismatic value.  (However, be careful, as many items sold as rare or collectible are worth no more than their actual melt value.)
Gold rounds look like gold coins, but they have no currency value.[43][44] They range in similar sizes as gold coins, including 0.05 troy ounce, 1 troy ounce, and larger. Unlike gold coins, gold rounds commonly have no additional metals added to them for durability purposes and do not have to be made by a government mint, which allows the gold rounds to have a lower overhead price as compared to gold coins. On the other hand, gold rounds are normally not as collectible as gold coins.
Warren Buffett, the CEO of Berkshire Hathaway (tickere: BRK.A, BRK.B) and perhaps the greatest investor of all time, understands that fear. Gold investors, he says, are "right to be afraid of paper money. Their basic premise that paper money around the world is going to be worth less and less over time is absolutely correct. They have the correct basic premise. They should run from paper money."
The next best thing to owning physical gold is buying an investment that counts physical gold as its primary asset. The easiest examples of this are ETFs like aforementioned SPDR Gold Shares. This particular ETF has an expense ratio of 0.40% and tracks gold prices pretty closely over time. It's probably the next best thing to physically owning gold, but unlike physical gold it can be easily traded.

The most obvious answer is to run out and buy some gold coins, bars, or jewelry. This isn't the best option for investors. For example, there's a huge markup on jewelry, which makes it a very bad investment choice. But there's also likely to be a markup on coins and bars that gets put into the price quoted from dealers. After all, they have to make a living and be compensated for acting as the intermediary between buyers and sellers.

The difference between mint bars and cast bars are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to variations in gold bars. The U.S. Gold Bureau carries a plethora of different sized bars, both cast and mint. One of the most important factors people take into account when buying gold is what size to purchase. As stated previously, gold can be found in almost any weight you can imagine. The single gram or 1 gram bar is about about as small as you can go when it comes to gold bars with investment potential. Sometimes referred to as the "small bills" of the gold world, these tiny bars are just about the size of a thumbtack. The 5, 10, and 20 gram bars are the next steps up in terms of gold bar weights.
A. Positively. Most of the strong demand globally since the beginning of 2016, has been driven by the low-to-negative-rate environment. At a time when fixed-yield investments pay little to nothing, gold and silver at least provide some upside potential. In addition, these metals protect against the downside risks implied by the low to non-existent rates of return. Those two very persuasive arguments have translated to strong institutional and fund demand at the ETFs as well as demand among individual investors for physical coins and bullion. A mid-2016 Bankrate survey of investors is telling in this regard. One in six chose gold as the best place to park money they would not need for the next ten years, the same number that chose stocks.

Answer. Since, for one reason or another, it is difficult to take delivery from any of the ETFs, they are generally viewed as a price bet and not actual ownership of the metal. Most gold investors want possession of their gold because they are buying as a hedge against an economic, financial or political disaster. When disaster strikes, it does not do you much good to have your gold stored in some distant facility by a third party. For this reason, over the past couple of years the trend even with hedge fund operators has been away from the ETFs. In 2011, ETF sales plummeted while purchases of physical coins and bullion for delivery skyrocketed.
So it should be pretty clear at this point that gold in and of itself can be a risky investment. But if you use gold appropriately, it can provide an offset to other assets that aren't performing well. And the interplay between gold and those other assets is what helps to create diversified portfolios. No, don't invest 100% of your saving into gold in any form. Yes, consider adding a small allotment of gold to your portfolio. But how should you invest in the metal?
Some coins stay in families for generations. Even over decades of time, each recipient realizes the value of their inheritance. Gold coins often serve as collectible investments because of their design, scarcity and demand. With each passing year, new coins are minted in different variations which may never be produced again. APMEX only sells Gold coins minted by the most trusted mints in the world. These mints include the United States Mint, Royal Canadian Mint, Perth Mint, Austrian Mint and more.
These particular buyers are looking to create a hefty fund to hedge inflation. When seeking to establish a substantial fund, bars become an extremely attractive option, as they are the easiest to stack and store. They come in weights as high as 100 troy ounces, making storage relatively easier when compared to other instruments such as rounds and coins. However, providing adequate safety and security to this massive quantity of silver can be a tedious task. Hence, private, offshore storage depositories, offering top-of-the-line security at reasonable prices, are considered a great option for storage.
As the oldest form of money, gold is a precious metal that has been prized by civilizations across the world for thousands of years. Gold coins are a staple in the gold bullion industry. They’re valued for both their gold bullion content as well as their design. Gold coins are very eye-appealing, and sovereign coins serve as legal tender in every nation in which they are produced.

For those that appreciate how gold works to improve investment reward vs volatility/risk in a portfolio, it is recommended that a minimum of 10% of an investment portfolio should be in gold, or other precious metals. However, investors often purchase more when economic or geopolitical uncertainty in the markets and around the world rises. Mathematically, “How Much Gold” over time would have suggested preferred diversification is close to 10%, but certainly your preferred mix of assets is dictated by your personal views and preferences.
Answer. We probably get that question more than any other -- pretty much on a daily basis. The answer, however, is not as straightforward as you might think. What you buy depends upon your goals. We usually answer the "What should I buy?" question with one of our own: "Why are you interested in buying gold?" If your goal is simply to hedge financial uncertainty and/or capitalize on price movement, then contemporary bullion coins will serve your purposes. Those concerned with the possibility of capital controls and a gold seizure, or call-in, often include historic pre-1933 gold coins in their planning. Both the contemporary bullion coins and historic gold coins carry modest premiums over their gold melt value, track the gold price, and enjoy strong liquidity internationally.

Further, the confiscation sales pitch is usually based on a very broad definition of “rare and unusual coins.” “They’ll say anything minted pre-1933 has numismatic value,” says Michael Freedman, president of Euro Pacific Precious Metals. In fact, Freedman says, “there were millions and millions of gold coins minted in the 1800s and early 1900s that were simply coin of the realm. They have no numismatic value.”
That’s why Mladjenovic prefers gold bullion coins. The price of the 1-ounce, 24-karat Maple Leaf approximately matches gold’s spot price and enjoyed a meteoric rise between 2005 and 2011, when the price of gold more than quadrupled. But what goes up sometimes comes down: The price of gold coins has tracked the recent decline in the price of gold, as well.
Answer. The biggest trap investors fall into is buying a gold investment that bears little or no relationship to his or her objectives. Take safe-haven investors for example. That group makes up 90% of our clientele, and probably a good 75% of the current physical gold market. Most often the safe-haven investor simply wants to add gold coins to his or her portfolio mix, but too often this same investor ends up instead with a leveraged (financed) gold position, or a handful of exotic rare coins, or a position in an ETF that amounts to little more than a bet on the gold price. These have little to do with safe-haven investing, and most investors would be well-served to avoid them.
The Federal Trade Commission reports a rise in boiler rooms hawking gold coins or bars. (A boiler room is filled with salespeople who cold call prospects and use high-pressure sales tactics.) Dama Brown, staff attorney for consumer affairs in the FTC’s Atlanta office, says that these operators usually make inflated claims about the potential profit from gold, such as “tripling your money in 30 days.” Such claims are often coupled with warnings about the weak economy and how gold, as a hard asset, is less risky than stocks, she says.
However, some gold dealers use these facts to scare investors into buying overpriced coins. Some history: Hello, the U.S. is no longer on the gold standard and hasn’t been since 1971. And the limit on gold ownership in the U.S. was repealed in 1974. So notwithstanding the paranoia-laden pitches of some salesmen (and right-wing radio hosts), there is no danger of gold confiscation.
These popular Gold coins intertwine with history and present a historical narrative that is equally important and inspiring. Every country that produces Gold coins has a unique history and story. There is an impressive selection of world coins that were born out of necessity, commemorate important events or people or produced with designs that show national pride. Buying Gold coins from around the world will help you grow your investment and collection. Buyers who have a cursory view of numismatics can enjoy the selection at APMEX. There is a popular Gold coin for everyone here.
Gold bullion coins usually come in 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, 1/10 and 1/20 oz. sizes. Most countries have one design that remains constant each year; others (such as the Chinese Panda coins) have variations each year, and in most cases each coin is dated. A 1/10 oz bullion coin is about the same size as a U.S. dime. A 1 oz. gold bullion coin is about the size of a U.S. half dollar.
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A Silver coin can come in a variety of sizes from 1/25 oz to 1 kilo, and every size in between. There are mints and refiners all over the world that create the best unique and valuable Silver coins. Whether you are a beginning or experienced collector, you will find a coin that fits your interests. The most common purchases are 1 ounce Silver coins, often bought by investors and Silver collectors alike. Some of our most popular Silver coins include:
Then you have to do something with the gold you've purchased. That could mean tossing it in a drawer, buying a safe, or renting a safe deposit box from the local bank. Depending on your selection, you could end up paying an ongoing cost for storing your gold. Selling, meanwhile, can be difficult since you have to retrieve your gold and bring it to a dealer, who may offer you a price that's below the current spot price -- effectively a markup in the opposite direction.
With 9 locations throughout the greater Dallas area, this is one of the region’s largest precious metal dealers. Dallas Gold & Silver Exchange buys all forms of gold, silver, and platinum. They also deal in rare coins and paper currency. Their inventory includes more than 250 bullion products such as the American Eagle, Canadian Maple Leaf, South African Krugerrand, Credit Suisse gold bars, kilo silver bars, and more. The stock of rare and collectible coins at Dallas Gold & Silver exchange includes PCGS and NGC certified coins, raw coins, proof and mint sets, and silver dollars. Many of their rarest coins can be viewed and purchased through their website.
As you look into ETFs, however, a word of warning: Make sure that you fully understand what the ETF is intended to do. The difference between the SPDR Gold Shares ETF and the two gold miner-focused VanEck ETFs is only the tip of the iceberg, as the more subtle difference between the two VanEck ETFs makes very clear. When you do your research, look closely at the index being tracked, paying particular attention to how it is constructed, the weighting approach, and when and how it gets rebalanced. All are important pieces of information that are easy to overlook when you assume that a simple ETF name will translate into a simple investment approach.
The Federal Trade Commission reports a rise in boiler rooms hawking gold coins or bars. (A boiler room is filled with salespeople who cold call prospects and use high-pressure sales tactics.) Dama Brown, staff attorney for consumer affairs in the FTC’s Atlanta office, says that these operators usually make inflated claims about the potential profit from gold, such as “tripling your money in 30 days.” Such claims are often coupled with warnings about the weak economy and how gold, as a hard asset, is less risky than stocks, she says.

The Gold price forecast is determined differently than most other investments. Stocks and commodities are evaluated as news about each company is released, or when cost changes occur in the manufacturing supply chain. Gold, however, has inherent value, which is not affected by turnovers in upper management or fuel costs. Economists use many factors when predicting Gold prices, including global inflation rates, trade imbalances between the United States and other countries, and the holdings of major central banks around the world. Expectations about higher interest rates and inflation have an impact on the Gold price forecast, as well. Supply and availability can impact some estimates, although when demand increases, many sellers become eager to recycle their existing supply.
With that said, it's worth noting that many silver bullion coin programs also have proof collectible options. These coins offer the same design as their bullion counterpart but deliver collectible value courtesy of a more visually brilliant design finish and lower, set mintage figures. The Proof American Silver Eagle Coin and the Proof Australian Silver Kangaroo are just two examples of silver bullion coin available in a collectible version as well.
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