Since 1980 Walnut Gold and Silver Inc. has served the downtown Dallas area with quality products and a high standard of customer service. Every customer is met with the same level of professional service and each dealer takes true pride in his or her numismatic knowledge. This means that the customer is getting the highest quality gold or silver buying experience.
The Mexican Mint issues the official gold bullion for the nation of Mexico. Backed by the federal government and Banco de Mexico, the nation’s central bank, the Mexican Gold Libertad coin debuted in 1981 and has been available annually since 1991. The coin series includes 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, 1/10 oz, and 1/20 oz options. The Gold Libertads feature the following designs:
Purchasing gold for investment purposes has traditionally been a hedge against inflation and weakness in the US dollar. For thousands of years gold has been a store of wealth and value which continues today. Owning physical precious metals is a strategy of the very wealthy for centuries and although precious metals don't necessarily need to be your only investment, it may be wise to make them a part of your strategy moving forward.
When you pair assets that move differently from each other, you create a more diversified portfolio. This is why mixing bonds with stocks is the foundation of so many portfolios. Bonds have a negative correlation with stocks, meaning they tend to go up when stocks are going down, and vice versa. Here's the interesting thing: Gold's correlation with bonds over the past decade or so is roughly 0.25, still very low. So gold doesn't track along with stocks, and it doesn't track along with bonds, either. Adding a small amount of gold to a stock and bond portfolio -- probably no more than 10% -- can help increase diversification and the ultimate safety of the entire portfolio.
But this gold standard did not last forever. During the 1900s, there were several key events that eventually led to the transition of gold out of the monetary system. In 1913, the Federal Reserve was created and started issuing promissory notes (the present day version of our paper money) that could be redeemed in gold on demand. The Gold Reserve Act of 1934 gave the U.S. government title to all the gold coins in circulation and put an end to the minting of any new gold coins. In short, this act began establishing the idea that gold or gold coins were no longer necessary in serving as money. The U.S. abandoned the gold standard in 1971 when its currency ceased to be backed by gold.
Not all silver products are IRA eligible for inclusion in precious metal retirement accounts. Please look for the ✔IRA APPROVED checkmark on the product page for the product that you are interested in purchasing. If the checkmark is not present on the page, that product is not eligible for inclusion in precious metal retirement accounts. If you have any questions regarding setting up or buying silver for your account please contact our staff at 1-800-294-8732.

In the early 1970s, one ounce of gold equaled $35. Let's say that at that time, you had a choice of either holding an ounce of gold or simply keeping the $35. They would both buy you the same things, like a brand new business suit or fancy bicycle. However, if you had an ounce of gold today and converted it for today's prices, it would still be enough to buy a brand new suit, but the same cannot be said for the $35. In short, you would have lost a substantial amount of your wealth if you decided to hold the $35 as opposed to the one ounce of gold because the value of gold has increased, while the value of a dollar has been eroded by inflation.


Given that $52 billion worth of gold was sold last year for investment purposes, according to the World Gold Council, it’s not surprising that shady dealers have lined up for a piece of the action. Most of the total was invested in gold mutual funds or exchange-traded funds. But some of us like to possess the lustrous stuff by buying it in coins or bars -- and that’s when you can get ripped off. Regulators say the number of rip-offs is rising with the price of the precious metal.
You also have to consider what you will do with the gold you buy in this scenario, which could mean buying a safe or paying for a bank safe deposit box. It's a perfectly fine way to own gold, if that's your goal, but it isn't the best way to invest in gold. And to fully benefit from the portfolio diversification gold offers, you'll need to rebalance your portfolio every so often as you take advantage of investors rushing to gold because it is viewed as a safe haven. 
The name or series of a bar, round, or coin plays a significant role in the demand for the product. To retain the freedom to invest in or divest out of a particular instrument, as and when the investor wants, it is advisable to stick to famous product names and series like the American Silver Eagles or Canadian Maple Leafs. Hence, at any given time you will be assured of scores of both active buyers and sellers in the market.
You can find a number of coins available at APMEX that allow you to be as diverse or selective as you would like. Some of these Gold coins also come in fractional sizes to fit any budget for investing. These popular bullion selections can add value to your portfolio. You can find anything from BU coins to graded and certified Gold coins at competitive prices. With such a large variety, you can find a coin that fits your interests and budget.
As of 2009 holders of COMEX gold futures have experienced problems taking delivery of their metal. Along with chronic delivery delays, some investors have received delivery of bars not matching their contract in serial number and weight. The delays cannot be easily explained by slow warehouse movements, as the daily reports of these movements show little activity. Because of these problems, there are concerns that COMEX may not have the gold inventory to back its existing warehouse receipts.[55]
These particular buyers are looking to create a hefty fund to hedge inflation. When seeking to establish a substantial fund, bars become an extremely attractive option, as they are the easiest to stack and store. They come in weights as high as 32.15 troy ounces, making storage relatively easier when compared to other instruments such as rounds and coins. However, providing adequate safety and security to this massive quantity of gold can be a tedious task. Hence, investors are increasingly attracted towards offshore gold storage facilities, advertising top-of-the-line security and peace of mind.

Investors who are solely interested in Silver’s stable purchasing power can find security in buying Silver rounds. Silver rounds are circular discs often manufactured by private mints, though sometimes produced by government mints. They have no “face value” and are not recognized as legal tender. Silver rounds are not quite as diverse or collectible as Silver coins, but are an excellent choice for those who want to invest in Silver as an anti-inflation hedge.
Yes, it is true that in 1933 President Roosevelt issued an order to collect gold from U.S. citizens because the bank panics of that year and other factors were draining the Federal Reserve’s gold supply, and we were on a gold-based currency standard back then. (The gold standard was a system under which the dollar was equal in value to, and exchangeable for, a specified amount of gold.) And yes, Executive Order 6102 exempted rare and unusual coins from having to be turned in.
Good delivery bars that are held within the London bullion market (LBMA) system each have a verifiable chain of custody, beginning with the refiner and assayer, and continuing through storage in LBMA recognized vaults. Bars within the LBMA system can be bought and sold easily. If a bar is removed from the vaults and stored outside of the chain of integrity, for example stored at home or in a private vault, it will have to be re-assayed before it can be returned to the LBMA chain. This process is described under the LBMA's "Good Delivery Rules".[39]
Australian Coins: Struck by the Perth Mint, the Australian Kangaroo gold coin is available in 1/10 ounce, ¼ ounce, ½ ounce, and 1-ounce weights. The coin design changes each year, and the 2017 version features a kangaroo leaping across the outback. One of the benefits of the Australian Kangaroo gold coin is that it is acceptable to purchase in an IRA.
A coin or bar dealer will not buy gold from you at the spot price, as they have to factor in their business overheads. They also have to consider the chance that the bar or coin is not what they think it is. Some rarer coins might be quoted at prices above spot, but in gold bullion products like small bars, Sovereigns or Krugerrands, this usually results in you receiving 2-5% less than the spot price when you come to sell.
Gold coins minted pre-1933 come in a range of monetary values. Each of these coin values also has a number of varieties for each denomination, depending on which year it was produced. Gold pieces were coins that were produced in small denominations such as 1-dollar, 3 dollars, and 4 dollars. The eagle was another major variety that comes in four denominations: 20-dollar double eagle, 10-dollar eagle, 5-dollar half eagle, and 2.50-dollar quarter eagle.
Gold bars are measured in troy ounces. The minimum purity required for producing a gold bar is 99.5 percent. They are stored in bullion vaults to maintain the status of Good Delivery bars. This also helps to ensure a maximum resale value. Gold bars for sale are commonly available in 1,000 kilograms and 32,150.765 troy ounces. Other weights include the kilo (32.15074656 troy ounces), 10 oz, 1 oz, 50 grams, and 117 grams.
A 20-crown gold coin from Norway. Introduced in 1875, it became part of the Scandinavian Monetary Union, which was based on a gold standard. Norwegian gold reserves included tonnes of this and other coins, backing Norway's paper money. The coin was designed for circulation: "124 Stk. 1 Kil. f. G." means that 124 pieces gave one kilogramme of pure gold.
Gold prices vary each day. Investors may check MoneyMetals.com to see the live global price of precious metals at any given time. As a general matter, the global metals market is open around the clock on Monday through Friday.  You can reference price charts which display both historic and live data in various currencies such as U.S. dollars, euros, British pounds, Australian dollars, Canadian dollars, and others. Live prices can change in just seconds. It is important to check prices in real time before buying or selling bullion.
The reason gold benefits from a declining U.S. dollar is because gold is priced in U.S. dollars globally. There are two reasons for this relationship. First, investors who are looking at buying gold (i.e., central banks) must sell their U.S. dollars to make this transaction. This ultimately drives the U.S. dollar lower as global investors seek to diversify out of the dollar. The second reason has to do with the fact that a weakening dollar makes gold cheaper for investors who hold other currencies. This results in greater demand from investors who hold currencies that have appreciated relative to the U.S. dollar.
These particular buyers are looking to create a hefty fund to hedge inflation. When seeking to establish a substantial fund, bars become an extremely attractive option, as they are the easiest to stack and store. They come in weights as high as 100 troy ounces, making storage relatively easier when compared to other instruments such as rounds and coins. However, providing adequate safety and security to this massive quantity of silver can be a tedious task. Hence, private, offshore storage depositories, offering top-of-the-line security at reasonable prices, are considered a great option for storage.
From gold exchange-traded funds (ETFs) to gold stocks and buying physical gold, investors now have several different options when it comes to investing in the royal metal. But what exactly is the purpose of gold? And why should investors even bother investing in the gold market? Indeed, these two questions have divided gold investors for the last several decades. One school of thought argues that gold is simply a barbaric relic that no longer holds the monetary qualities of the past. In a modern economic environment, where paper currency is the money of choice, gold's only benefit is the fact that it is a material that is used in jewelry.
Additionally, Gold is recognized the world over as carrying intrinsic value. If you wish to sell or trade your Gold in the future, you know there will always be a market for it. If you wish to endow your loved ones with a tangible inheritance, you know that Gold will only be more valuable in another lifetime. You might buy physical Gold for any or all of these reasons.
A flat bar struck using .999+ (usually) pure gold is known as a gold bullion bar. Ranging from 1 troy ounce to even 32 troy ounces, gold bars are available in various sizes. However, 1 gram, 1 oz, 100 gram and kilo size remain the most common weights available in the bullion market. Their popularity stems from the fact that they are worth very close to their gold melt values – making them a solid investment choice.  

The Perth Mint produces a bullion coin called the Australian Gold Nugget. It is part of the Gold Nugget series introduced in 1986. From 1986 to 1989, the reverse of the coin depicted a variety of Australian gold nuggets. In 1989, the design started to feature kangaroos, the internationally recognized symbol of Australia. These coins are used as both legal tender and bullion coins.
These different weights of bars will carry prices depending on a number of factors. First, the spot price of gold--the current market price at which gold is being bought and sold--will drastically effect how much a gold bar will go for. What's more, the refinery that has minted the bar factors in to the overall price. Some refineries have a more distinguished reputation and therefore will charge more for their gold bars. The purity of fineness of the gold itself will also come into play. Gold fineness is measured in karats. You can find gold fineness ranked as 333 which equates to 8 karats, all the way to 24 karat 999.999 fine gold, which is the purest gold bar possible.
A flat bar struck using .999+ (usually) pure gold is known as a gold bullion bar. Ranging from 1 troy ounce to even 32 troy ounces, gold bars are available in various sizes. However, 1 gram, 1 oz, 100 gram and kilo size remain the most common weights available in the bullion market. Their popularity stems from the fact that they are worth very close to their gold melt values – making them a solid investment choice.  
Available with limited mintage figures, gilded silver bullion coins contain a thin layer of 24-karat gold applied to the primary design on the surface of coins. The layer of 24-karat gold is not enough to alter the overall weight of the coin and does not add significant value to the coin based upon its metal content. However, gilded silver bullion coins do have added numismatic value as a result of the visual beauty and low availability. Popular coins such as the American Silver Eagle, Austrian Silver Philharmonic, and Somalian Silver Elephant are all available on an annual basis with a gilded finish. In the case of most of these coins, the gilded layering is applied by a third-party and not the issuing mint.
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