When it comes to purchasing or selling silver bullion, the market value for silver (also referred to as "spot price") is the basis for all pricing. View the current spot price for silver. Almost all silver products on SD Bullion operate on a silver spot price plus the product premium (also referred to as "over spot") formula to determine the final price. For example, if the market value for silver is X and the product premium is Y, the final price would be X+Y=Z. Premium pricing is mostly consistent per product but the market value for silver changes vastly on a minute by minute basis. Our market feed integrates live up to the minute market prices from worldwide markets. We offer both live and historical market data available on our website's Live Market Prices page. You can customize charts to research and find trends in pricing and compare to other precious metal types.

One of the most frequently asked questions is, "What gold bar should I buy?" In addition to the size of the gold bar having an impact on overall price and premium above the fluctuating gold spot price, the gold bar’s mint may affect a gold bullion bar’s pricing slightly.  A highly recognizable government gold bar may sell for a few dollars more than a like kind gold bar from a less recognizable privately minted gold bar when you decide to sell your gold bar back to a gold bullion dealer.  A gold bullion bar guaranteed and produced by a sovereign national mint such as the Royal Canadian Mint (RCM) will typically have a higher premium or slightly higher price when buying, but government guaranteed gold bars typically receive a higher buy back premium when you go to sell your gold bar back to gold dealers or other investors. Similarly, a gold bullion bar from a highly recognizable private gold mint may sell for a slightly higher premium than a smaller less recognizable private gold mint. Live buyback prices for gold bars can be found online on the corresponding product page.
Silver coins are no longer produced for circulation in the United States, but that doesn't mean it's impossible to find silver coins to buy. Bullion silver coins are available from sovereign mints around the world and a select few private mints contracted to work with foreign reserve banks. These coins range from annual-issue, investment-grade silver bullion coins to limited-edition proof silver coins. There's no shortage of variety when it comes to buying silver coins. You only have to decide which coins catch your eye and are worthy of your investment!
Silver bars may be purchased and stored at home, in safe deposit boxes or in other secure storage facilities, such as third party vaults. Silver bars are typically made from 99.9 percent pure silver, while some producers, like the Royal Canadian Mint for example, use .9999 percent fineness. Silver bars are always stamped with markings to note the purity, manufacturer and weight of the bar. Because of the small premiums over the silver spot price they typically carry, silver bars are one of the most affordable ways to invest in silver bullion.

Silver has many different uses both industrially and as an investment vehicle. Silver is a very interesting precious metal which has unique malleability, strength and ductility. It can endure extreme temperature changes, and its electrical and thermal conductivity make it extremely versatile in modern industry. The fact is, silver can accomplish things that other elements cannot come close to and, therefore, demand for it is likely to continue to rise. Silver is most commonly used today in electrical components, silver oxide batteries and various areas of radiography
So it should be pretty clear at this point that gold in and of itself can be a risky investment. But if you use gold appropriately, it can provide an offset to other assets that aren't performing well. And the interplay between gold and those other assets is what helps to create diversified portfolios. No, don't invest 100% of your saving into gold in any form. Yes, consider adding a small allotment of gold to your portfolio. But how should you invest in the metal?
Specialized Maple Leaf coins are also available. One has a face value of $1 million. Another special issue contains .99999 gold weight, referred to as “Five Nines.” Maples are soft and can show handling marks quite easily. A bimetallic  maple leaf with a bullion finish was released from 1979 through 2005. These coins were packaged in a black leather case and the collection was meant to commemorate the Royal Canadian Mint.

Clearly, there's more to understand about streaming companies, but a short list of benefits includes widely diversified portfolios, contractually built-in low prices that lead to wide margins in good years and bad, and exposure to gold price changes (since streaming companies make money by selling the gold they buy from the miners). That said, none of the major streaming companies has a pure gold portfolio, with silver the most common added exposure. Franco-Nevada Corp., the largest streaming and royalty company, also has exposure to oil and gas drilling. So you'll need to do a little homework here to fully understand what commodity exposures you'll get from your investment. And while streaming companies avoid many of the risks of running a mine, they don't completely sidestep them: If a mine isn't producing any gold, there's nothing for a streaming company to buy.
First minted in 1967, the Krugerrand is a South African coin. The South African Mint produced it to help market gold from South Africa. It was also used as a form of legal tender and as gold bullion. By 1980, it accounted for 90 percent of the gold coin market around the world. Paul Kruger, the President of the South African Republic from 1883 to 1900, is featured on the obverse. The South African unit of currency, or “rand,” is shown on the reverse of the coin.
A. Traditionally, wealthy, aristocratic European and Asian families have kept a strong percentage of their assets in gold as a protective factor. The long term economic picture for the United States has changed enormously over the past several years. As a result, that same philosophy has taken hold in the United States particularly among those interested in preserving their wealth both for themselves and for their families from one generation to the next. In recent years, we have helped a good many family trusts diversify with gold coins and bullion at the advice of their portfolio managers. Few people know that the United States is the third largest consumer market for gold after China and India.

Although governments have decided it's easier to be off the gold standard than on it, that doesn't change the central issue that backs gold's intrinsic value and safe-haven status: There's only so much gold in the world. The gold that's above ground being used in some fashion is estimated to be around 190,000 metric tons. The amount of gold in the ground that can be economically mined today is notably less, at roughly 54,000 metric tons.    

ALL STATEMENTS PRESENTED IN THIS WEBSITE ARE THE EXCLUSIVE OPINIONS OF NOBLE GOLD, INC. AND OF NO OTHER PARTY. IT MUST BE EMPHASIZED THAT THE PERFORMANCE OF INVESTMENTS OR PURCHASES THAT HAVE OCCURRED PREVIOUSLY MAY NOT BE TAKEN AS PREDICTING FUTURE PERFORMANCE OR RESULTS. INVESTING IN PRECIOUS METALS, INCLUDING GOLD COINS, GOLD OR SILVER BARS, INVOLVE RISKS, AND MAY NOT BE APPROPRIATE FOR ALL INVESTORS. THE VALUE OF THESE ITEMS MAY CHANGE DEPENDING ON VARIOUS CONDITIONS, AND MAY FLUCTUATE, ACCORDINGLY. NOBLE GOLD, INC. MAKES NO REPRESENTATIONS OR GUARANTEES THAT METALS PURCHASED WILL APPRECIATE IN VALUE. ANY DECISION TO BUY OR SELL PRECIOUS METALS MUST BE THAT OF THE CUSTOMER, ACTING ALONE, AND SHOULD BE MADE WITH CAUTION, ON THE BASIS OF THE CUSTOMER’S OWN PERSONAL INVESTIGATION AND RESEARCH, AND EXCLUSIVE JUDGMENT. BY ACCESSING THE INFORMATION PRESENTED ON THIS WEBSITE AND UTILIZING THE SERVICES OF NOBLE GOLD, INC. YOU HEREBY AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THE TERMS OF SERVICE AND PRIVACY POLICY OF THE COMPANY.


Derivatives, such as gold forwards, futures and options, currently trade on various exchanges around the world and over-the-counter (OTC) directly in the private market. In the U.S., gold futures are primarily traded on the New York Commodities Exchange (COMEX) and Euronext.liffe. In India, gold futures are traded on the National Commodity and Derivatives Exchange (NCDEX) and Multi Commodity Exchange (MCX).[54]
Central banks and the International Monetary Fund play an important role in the gold price. At the end of 2004, central banks and official organizations held 19% of all above-ground gold as official gold reserves.[18] The ten-year Washington Agreement on Gold (WAG), which dates from September 1999, limited gold sales by its members (Europe, United States, Japan, Australia, the Bank for International Settlements and the International Monetary Fund) to less than 500 tonnes a year.[19] In 2009, this agreement was extended for a further five years, but with a smaller annual sales limit of 400 tonnes.[20] European central banks, such as the Bank of England and the Swiss National Bank, have been key sellers of gold over this period.[21]
American Gold Eagle: The American Gold Eagle coin is the official gold bullion coin from the United States, and the coins debuted in 1986. Each Gold Eagle features 22-karat gold for both bullion, proof, and burnished coins. The bullion and proof coins include 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, and 1/10 oz coins, while the burnished coin has just a 1 oz option. All coins feature Lady Liberty from Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ 1907 design on the obverse, with Miley Busiek’s family of bald eagles on the reverse.
A. Traditionally, wealthy, aristocratic European and Asian families have kept a strong percentage of their assets in gold as a protective factor. The long term economic picture for the United States has changed enormously over the past several years. As a result, that same philosophy has taken hold here particularly among those interested in preserving their wealth both for themselves and for their families from one generation to the next. In recent years, we have helped a good many family trusts diversify with gold coins and bullion at the advice of their portfolio managers.

A reliable coin and bullion dealer stays on top of the market closings and updates their prices accordingly. At US Bullion Exchange they strive to stay on the top tier of coin retailers and are constantly updating and resupplying their stock of coins and bars. In the interest of allowing their customers to gain the same access as their dealers US Bullion offers a posting of daily closing gold and silver prices.

Exchange-traded funds. If you don't particularly care about holding the gold you own but want direct exposure to the physical metal, then an exchange-traded fund like SPDR Gold Shares is probably the way to go. This fund directly purchases gold on behalf of its shareholders. You'll likely have to pay a commission to trade an ETF, and there will be a management fee (SPDR Gold Share's expense ratio is 0.40%), but you'll benefit from a liquid investment that invests directly in gold coins, bullion, and bars. That said, not all gold-related ETFs invest directly in gold, as I'll discuss below. 
It probably doesn't come as a surprise to hear that gold is the most popular among precious metals investing. Often, investors will go into gold in an effort to diversify their portfolio and mitigate potential damage in economic recessions. Still, like every other market in the world, the gold market can fluctuate drastically. This doesn't stop people from investing in the precious metal, securing it for use in the future. Despite world governments abandoning the gold standard and moving to flat currency, the yellow metal has never fully gone out of style. It carries value all over the world, across border both cultural and physical.
Gold certificates allow gold investors to avoid the risks and costs associated with the transfer and storage of physical bullion (such as theft, large bid-offer spread, and metallurgical assay costs) by taking on a different set of risks and costs associated with the certificate itself (such as commissions, storage fees, and various types of credit risk).
Bars come in various shapes and sizes and are made by different fabricators or mints from all over the world. Silver bars can offer investors a simple and easy way to accumulate varying amounts of silver in its purest form. Common silver bar sizes include 1 oz, 5 oz, 10 oz, 1 kilogram and 100 oz. Some of the more common producers of these silver bars are Johnson Matthey, OPM Metals, Engelhard, NTR Metals, Sunshine Mint, SilverTowne and the Royal Canadian Mint.
In 2008, despite the financial crisis, some investors continued to hedge against a dollar decline caused by two new factors. One was the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing program, launched in December 2008. In that program, the Fed exchanged credit for bank Treasurys. The Fed simply created the credit out of thin air. Investors were concerned this increase in the money supply would create inflation.

A. Over the past few years, as concern about a financial and economic breakdown spread, there were periods of gold coin bottlenecks and actual shortages. In 2008-2009 at the height of the financial crisis, demand was so great that the national mints could not keep up with it. The flow of historic gold coins from Europe was also insufficient to meet accelerating demand both there and in the United States. Premiums shot-up on all gold and silver coins and a scramble developed for what was available. There is an old saying that the best time to buy gold is when everything is quiet. I would underline that sentiment.
Perhaps the biggest factor in the growth of silver mining, however, was the Spanish discovery of The New World in 1492. Production in the Americas by far exceeded anything that had been done previously. Silver mining continued to grow and flourish, and eventually new discoveries were made in other parts of the world such as China, Canada, Australia and Africa. In the past century, the technological advances made by humans have helped drive silver production to new heights and are ever increasing its demand. In fact, global mine production of silver now averages 671 million troy ounces per year!
Avoid rare coins. Rare coins require more diligence and expertise when buying them, Mladjenovic says. Two coins may look alike but have completely different grades. This difference can add up to thousands of dollars. You should hire a professional grading service and get a certificate of authenticity when buying rare coins — a hassle for most investors.
Investing in gold coins from exotic, unknown mints can be a risky choice. Grading, purity, and other factors determine the value of gold coins – but investors must take great care when sinking money into the illiquid and opaque collectible market. Coins that are supposedly worth way more than their actual melt value should be avoided by everyone but experienced collectors.
The United States Mint is the sovereign mint of the United States of America and the only one authorized to produce American gold coins. Since 1794, the US Mint has issued both circulation gold currency and bullion gold coinage. From 1794 to 1933, the United States issued circulation gold coins in 22-karat gold (1794-1837) and .900 pure gold content (1838-1933). In 1986, the United States reintroduced gold coinage with gold bullion coins for investment and collection. The following are examples of American gold coins for sale:
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