Once you have decided on the quantity of gold bullion to purchase, your Monex Account Representative will assist you in executing your order over the phone. Your purchase and price will be confirmed on a voice recorded line after your acknowledgment, and a written confirmation will be sent to you with the details of your order. Payment may be made after you order, but must be initiated on the day of purchase, which means you must mail or wire funds on the day of your purchase. You can have your metal (a) shipped to your home; (b) made available for pick-up at over 30 facilities across the U.S. and Canada; or (c) have your metal delivered to a bank/depository for storage.


The Perth Mint produces a bullion coin called the Australian Gold Nugget. It is part of the Gold Nugget series introduced in 1986. From 1986 to 1989, the reverse of the coin depicted a variety of Australian gold nuggets. In 1989, the design started to feature kangaroos, the internationally recognized symbol of Australia. These coins are used as both legal tender and bullion coins.
On the other end of the spectrum is a school of thought that asserts gold is an asset with various intrinsic qualities that make it unique and necessary for investors to hold in their portfolios. In this article, we will focus on the purpose of gold in the modern era, why it still belongs in investors' portfolios and the different ways to invest in the gold market.

Gold should not be bought alone as an investment. Gold itself is speculative, and can have high peaks and low valleys. That makes it too risky for the average individual investor. Over the long run, the value of gold doesn't beat inflation. But gold is an integral part of a diversified portfolio. It should include other commodities such as oil, mining, and investments in other hard assets.
"The rich old speculator Bernard M. Baruch forehandedly bought gold and gold shares after the 1929 Crash. Years later a suspicious Treasury Secretary asked him why. Because, Baruch replied, he was 'commencing to have doubts about the currency.' Many are beginning to doubt the strength of the dollar as they well might. Following Baruch's example, they should lay in some gold as a hedge."

Advance fee fraud – Various emails circulate on the Internet for buyers or sellers of up to 10,000 metric tonnes of gold (an amount greater than US Federal Reserve holdings). Through the use of fake legalistic phrases, such as "Swiss Procedure" or "FCO" (Full Corporate Offer), naive middlemen are drafted as hopeful brokers. The end-game of these scams varies, with some attempting to extract a small "validation" amount from the innocent buyer/seller (in hopes of hitting the big deal),[68] and others focused on draining the bank accounts of their targeted dupes.[69]

People with limited capital to invest in precious metals may not divest as much as they would desire into gold bullion. Hence, such buyers should stick to cheaper low-risk gold bullion products with lower premiums over spot, offering them solid appreciation over time – granting them with inflation-proof, financial protection. This is the best way to hedge against inflation and is recommended by financial advisors as a good method of balancing portfolios.
A real world example here might help. Between Nov. 30, 2007, and June 1, 2009 (the deep 2007-to-2009 recession), the S&P 500 Index fell 36%. The price of gold, on the other hand, rose 25%. That's a particularly dramatic example, but it highlights why investors can benefit from owning gold despite the fact that it is a more volatile investment option. Essentially, when stock prices are going south, gold is likely to be appreciating in value as investors search out safe havens for their cash. 

However, some gold dealers use these facts to scare investors into buying overpriced coins. Some history: Hello, the U.S. is no longer on the gold standard and hasn’t been since 1971. And the limit on gold ownership in the U.S. was repealed in 1974. So notwithstanding the paranoia-laden pitches of some salesmen (and right-wing radio hosts), there is no danger of gold confiscation.
Most of the countries that mint gold have a design that stays the same each year. Some vary the designs annually and date the gold coin, such as the Chinese Panda coins. Proof (PF) uncirculated coins are typically more expensive than non-proof gold coins. They require extra time and effort to make and can have a slightly higher value than non-proof because of demand from collectors. However, both contain the same amount of precious metal so investing in proof coins is highly speculative and generally a play on collectible value as opposed to the metal itself.
The 1 Troy oz gold bar is the most common size traded around the world. Even countries that use the metric system still produce bars (and coins) in the 1 Troy oz size, since it is so popular. In the gold business, if someone just says “gold bar,” they are probably referring to the 1 Troy oz size. While we’re on the subject, don’t confuse a Troy ounce (the unit of measure used for precious metals) with the avoirdupois ounce (like your local grocery store or bathroom scale might use). A Troy ounce is “heavier” than an avoirdupois ounce. There are 31.1 grams in a Troy ounce, but only 28.35 grams in a “regular” avoirdupois ounce. This bar is about the same size as a military dog-tag, but a bit thicker.
(Reader Note: USAGOLD offers an Online Order Desk as a subsidiary service for our clientele. Here you can choose from a full assortment of established investment items including modern gold and silver bullion coins and bullion bars, historic fractional gold coins and historic U.S. gold coins. At our Online Order Desk, you can order confidently any time day or night and on weekends at very competitive rates.)

Gold coins offer a unique investment opportunity as you are not only investing in the metal itself, but also the scarcity or rarity of the coin. Many collectors will use mintage as a guide when choosing gold coins to collect. Most larger countries are modern producers of gold coins with many countries who have been producing them for centuries. The use of gold coins dates back to ancient times and coin collecting has been appropriately named the "hobby of kings". Today's popular gold coins include the US American Gold Eagle, The Canadian Gold Maple Leaf, The Gold Chinese Panda and many others. Golden Eagle stocks an enormous inventory of gold coins from the modern bullion issues all the way back to ancient coins.
When looking for an American gold eagle, you'll come across some certified bullion. This means that an organization with a strong professional reputation rated the coin as authentic. Investors look for those certified by the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation or the Professional Coin Grading Service. Both organizations guarantee that the product is authentic and that it contains the right mixture of metals. These organizations also assign a numeric rating to the American Eagles and similar designs based on its value and condition.
Practically speaking, however, a buy-and-hold passive investing strategy may be best for the ordinary gold investor. Since economies tend to be cyclical, buy when the price of gold is down, whether or not your country is currently going through turmoil or you think it’s headed for some. In this way, you don’t have to worry about buying when everyone else is buying and driving the price up.
As you would have probably figured out by now, all forms of gold bullion products have their purpose in an investment portfolio. Hence, a safe and recommended strategy is to allocate a specific ratio (depending on you or the advice of your investment advisor) of every type of gold bullion instrument in your tangible assets. However, it is an entirely personal decision that one must take after careful deliberation.
However, there's a downside as well. Because a miner is running an operating business, you are also facing the risk that things might not work out as planned. As noted above, mines don't always produce as much gold as expected, workers sometimes go on strike, and, unfortunately, mining is risky and disasters can take place that halt production and cost lives. All in all, gold miners can perform better or worse than gold -- depending on what's going on at the specific miner you're looking at.
For many centuries, gold coins were the primary form of money. They started to fall into disuse by the early 20th century. In 1933, most countries switched from the gold standard to define the value of a dollar. This was because of the hoarding that occurred during the Great Depression. As a result, most countries stopped making gold coins to use as currency. The United States did not make a complete change until 1971 when it finally ended the draconian ban on investment ownership. For numismatic purposes, gold coins must not include alloys such as manganese brass. Some legal tender coins are not circulated, which means they are primarily for investment and collectors.

Given the fact that gold no longer backs the U.S. dollar (or other worldwide currencies for that matter), why is it still important today? The simple answer is that while gold is no longer in the forefront of everyday transactions, it is still important to the global economy. To validate this point, there is no need to look further than the balance sheets of central banks and other financial organizations, such as the International Monetary Fund. Presently, these organizations are responsible for holding approximately one-fifth of the world's supply of above-ground gold. In addition, several central banks have added to their present gold reserves, reflecting concerns about the long-term global economy.
A. A solid, professional gold firm can go a long way in helping the investor shortcut the learning curve. A good gold firm can help you avoid some the problems and pitfalls encountered along the way, and provide some direction. It can help you in the beginning and through the course of your gold ownership both in making additions to your portfolio and liquidations. A solid companion piece to the interview you are now reading is How to Choose a Gold Firm offered on this website. It offers clear guidelines for newcomers and is well-worth the five or ten minutes it takes to read it.
The Royal Mint of England anchors its gold bullion coins with the British Gold Britannia coins. Introduced in 1987, the Gold Britannia features a reverse design created by artist Philip Nathan. Britannia has previously featured on various British coins, but Nathan’s reverse design introduced for these gold bullion coins brought a new, powerful vision of Britannia to British coinage. The obverse features new images of Queen Elizabeth II updated throughout her reign to accurately reflect her age. You’ll also find the Queen’s Beast Series of gold coins available from the Royal Mint, which include:
One of the most affordable ways to get gold is the Lady Liberty round, made of .9999 pure (24 karats) gold in one-tenth troy ounce. They are not legal tender and the goal is to provide the buyer with more gold for the money versus fractional coin bullion. Lady Liberty is featured on the obverse with the image of a descending bald eagle on the reverse.

Pricing for precious metal numismatic products (e.g., palladium, platinum, 24-k gold, 22-k gold) varies by the average cost of the underlying metal. We use our pricing range table the week prior to sale in order to determine the product's price. If the average weekly price of the precious metal moves up or down into another cost range, the price of the product will also go up or down, respectively, by a fixed amount. You’ll find detailed pricing instructions here. If you need the Adobe reader, you can get it from Adobe.
What condition it's in: Condition is the first aspect to look at. The condition of a Double Eagle, Liberty Head, Saint-Gaudens or other variety will help you understand what it is worth. Bullion in mint condition will be in better shape than a circulated piece. As your hands contain oils that can rub down the details on a coin, the less it is handled, the better condition it will to be in.
The average investor prefers to purchase silver coins issued by sovereign mints. These coins are known commodities around the world. Each one features the same weight and metal content with every release year. A central government and/or central bank backs the purity and weight of each, and in most cases issues a nominal face value for the coin even though the value of its silver content outweighs any denominational value. There is great diversity in the silver bullion coin market, with the following coins representing the most popular from mints around the world:
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