When it comes to purchasing or selling silver bullion, the market value for silver (also referred to as "spot price") is the basis for all pricing. View the current spot price for silver. Almost all silver products on SD Bullion operate on a silver spot price plus the product premium (also referred to as "over spot") formula to determine the final price. For example, if the market value for silver is X and the product premium is Y, the final price would be X+Y=Z. Premium pricing is mostly consistent per product but the market value for silver changes vastly on a minute by minute basis. Our market feed integrates live up to the minute market prices from worldwide markets. We offer both live and historical market data available on our website's Live Market Prices page. You can customize charts to research and find trends in pricing and compare to other precious metal types.
Many investors buying gold turn to gold bullion coins from sovereign mints. Gold coins are a popular choice because the weight and purity of the coins are backed by a central bank and sovereign. Moreover, gold coins are produced on an annual basis to meet consumer demand, so there’s rarely a shortage of gold coins available to those investors who want to purchase the precious metal in this form. The following are some of the most popular gold coins for sale:
When people buy physical gold, they can store it themselves, have someone store it for them or do a combination of both. Some people keep it in a home safe, storage boxes, or in coin capsules at home. Others store it in a safe deposit box at the bank or other secure location. Safe deposit boxes at the bank are affordable but may offer limited access, based on the hours of the financial institution. The bank does not insure the contents of the box, which means separate insurance should be purchased.

A bullion coin is a coin struck from precious metal and kept as a store of value or an investment, rather than used in day-to-day commerce.[1] A bullion coin is distinguished by an explicit statement of weight (or mass) and fineness on the coin; this is because the weight and composition of coins intended for legal tender is specified in the coinage laws of the issuing nation, and therefore there is no need for an explicit statement on the coins themselves. The United Kingdom defines investment coins more specifically as coins that have been minted after 1800, have a purity of not less than 900 thousandths and are, or have been, legal tender in their country of origin.[2] Under United States law, "coins" that fail the last of these requirements are not coins at all,[3] and must be advertised as "rounds" instead. Bullion coins are usually available in both gold and silver[citation needed], with the exceptions of the Krugerrand[4] (note in 2017 the first silver Krugerrand was minted[5]) and the Swiss Vreneli which are only available in gold. The American Eagle and Canadian Gold Maple Leaf series are available in gold, silver and platinum, and palladium.[6][7]
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