So it should be pretty clear at this point that gold in and of itself can be a risky investment. But if you use gold appropriately, it can provide an offset to other assets that aren't performing well. And the interplay between gold and those other assets is what helps to create diversified portfolios. No, don't invest 100% of your saving into gold in any form. Yes, consider adding a small allotment of gold to your portfolio. But how should you invest in the metal?
So gold is a physical asset that we wear as jewelry or own in the form of coins and bars, with supply and demand driving the price. But to get an idea of what that means relative to other assets you need to look at some statistics, like standard deviation. Standard deviation is the degree to which the price of something varies from its average over a given period of time, with lower numbers suggesting less price variability.  
Gold bullion bars are typically the lowest gold buying price option when investing in physical gold bullion. The most popular gold bar sizes are the 1 oz gold bar, 10 oz gold bar, and 1 kilo gold bar. Gold bullion bars can be minted from government gold mints like the Royal Canadian Mint (RCM) or private gold mints such as the highly recognized Sunshine Minting Inc. Buying gold bars is a popular investment for both new and experienced physical precious metal investors and long term gold bullion savers.

Each year the Royal Canadian Mint produces the Canadian Gold Maple Leaf bullion coin that is issued by the Government of the Dominion of Canada. The standard gold Royal Canadian Mint coins weighs one troy ounce with a face value of $50 Canadian dollars. It is one of the purest gold coins in the world at .99999 millesimal fineness. Other sizes frequently sold inMaple Leaf Coins to investors include 1 gram, 1/25 oz, 1/20 oz, 1/10 oz and ½ oz. The obverse features a profile of Queen Elizabeth II of Canada with the Canadian Maple Leaf on the reverse. Security features were introduced in 2013 and 2015 that are only visible under magnification.

With that said, it's worth noting that many silver bullion coin programs also have proof collectible options. These coins offer the same design as their bullion counterpart but deliver collectible value courtesy of a more visually brilliant design finish and lower, set mintage figures. The Proof American Silver Eagle Coin and the Proof Australian Silver Kangaroo are just two examples of silver bullion coin available in a collectible version as well.


The gold in these gold eagle bullion coins comes from American sources. It is alloyed with copper and silver for durability. Crown gold refers to 22 karat alloy, per the English standard, which has not been used in the U.S. since 1937. American eagles contain a gold fraction of .9167, which is authorized as 22 karats, with 3% silver and 5.33% copper. Un-circulated and proof versions, which are produced at the West Point Mint in New York, are available for coin collectors. The eagles minted from 1986 through 1991 feature the date in Roman numerals. Now Arabic numbers designate the date on these coins.
A bullion coin is an investment-grade coin that is valued by its weight and fineness of a specific precious metal. Unlike commemorative or numismatic coins valued by limited mintage, rarity, condition, and age, bullion coins are purchased by investors seeking a simple and tangible means to own and invest in the gold, silver, platinum, and palladium markets.
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