Exchange-traded funds. If you don't particularly care about holding the gold you own but want direct exposure to the physical metal, then an exchange-traded fund like SPDR Gold Shares is probably the way to go. This fund directly purchases gold on behalf of its shareholders. You'll likely have to pay a commission to trade an ETF, and there will be a management fee (SPDR Gold Share's expense ratio is 0.40%), but you'll benefit from a liquid investment that invests directly in gold coins, bullion, and bars. That said, not all gold-related ETFs invest directly in gold, as I'll discuss below. 
The price of gold fluctuates constantly in the markets. This can make pricing gold bars somewhat challenging for many dealers. But we’ve created a system that updates the prices of our products in real time in accordance with the spot price of gold at the time of purchase. We also have a price match guarantee to match the advertised price of any of our products on the sites of our top competitors.

Most of the countries worldwide switched from the gold standard by 1933 due to central bankers’ attempts to accelerate inflation and money printing during Great Depression. As a result, most mints around the world stopped making gold coins as a circulating currency. In the U.S. in 1933, the Executive Order 6102 forbade the “hoarding” of gold. This was followed by a devaluation of the dollar relative to gold. By 1971, the U.S. completely detached the dollar from the value of gold. Consider the rare 1933 $30 Double Eagle sold in 2002 at Sotheby's for $7,590,020, making it the most valuable coin sold to date. American gold coins minted prior to 1933 are not collectible (and can therefore be obtained near their actual melt value), but they are a wonderful way to buy a piece of American history. Plus, these pre-1933 gold coins are a solid investment without paying a collector's premium. if you would prefer silver, old silver coins for sale are very similiar to these pre-1933 gold coins.
Now that you understand why buying Gold is a good use of your investment dollar, you may need guidance regarding how to buy physical Gold. Luckily, buying physical Gold is simple. If you choose an established, well-regarded Precious Metals company, you can buy with confidence. Buying physical Gold should be an enjoyable part of your investment journey. Consider working with APMEX to experience the thrill of buying physical Gold free from worry. A common first purchase is the Gold American Eagle, one of the most popular Gold bullion items with investors.

Gold should not be bought alone as an investment. Gold itself is speculative, and can have high peaks and low valleys. That makes it too risky for the average individual investor. Over the long run, the value of gold doesn't beat inflation. But gold is an integral part of a diversified portfolio. It should include other commodities such as oil, mining, and investments in other hard assets.

American Gold Eagle: The American Gold Eagle coin is the official gold bullion coin from the United States, and the coins debuted in 1986. Each Gold Eagle features 22-karat gold for both bullion, proof, and burnished coins. The bullion and proof coins include 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, and 1/10 oz coins, while the burnished coin has just a 1 oz option. All coins feature Lady Liberty from Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ 1907 design on the obverse, with Miley Busiek’s family of bald eagles on the reverse.
Investments in either gold or silver are completely reliant on the customer’s preferences. The important thing behind deciding what to invest in is to ensure you are informed in the metals markets. Our website offers amazing resources to help you decide which investment is right for you. To understand more about why you should invest in gold, silver, palladium or platinum, visit the page on “Why Silver” and also take advantage of Monex' proprietary “Market Outlook” which contains reports analyzing each of the four precious metals.
ModernCoinMart® / MCM® is a private distributor of coin and currency issues and privately licensed collectibles, and is not affiliated with the U.S. government. MCM is not an investment company and does not offer financial advice. The collectible coin market is highly speculative and involves risk. You must decide for yourself if you are willing to accept these risks, including the risk that you may not be able to liquidate your purchases at prices acceptable to you. MCM makes every effort to ensure facts, figures and offers are accurate; however, errors may and do occur. MCM reserves the right, within its sole discretion and without prior notice to the consumer, to decline to consummate any sale based on such errors. All facts and figures, and populations of graded, autographed or pedigreed coins, are deemed accurate as of the date of publication, but may change significantly over time. ModernCoinMart, MCM and GovMint.com® are brands of Asset Marketing Services®. All rights reserved ©ModernCoinMart.
Mutual funds. Another option for investors who prefer the idea of owning mining stocks over direct gold exposure is to buy a portfolio of miners all at once via a pooled investment. This saves investors the legwork of researching the various mining options and is a simple way to create a diversified portfolio of mining stocks with a single investment. There are a lot of options here, with most major mutual fund houses offering open-end funds that invest in gold miners. Two examples are the Fidelity Select Gold Portfolio and Vanguard Precious Metals Fund. 
Another popular means of adding numismatic value to silver bullion coins is the application of a colorized lacquer. This too is typically applied only to the primary design of a coin on one side. For example, Colorized American Silver Eagle Coins feature brilliant hues and the red, white, and blue of the American flag on the image of Walking Liberty. The colorized lacquer does not change the weight of the coin, nor does it impact the silver content in any way. It is simply a means of adding a collectible twist to popular silver bullion coins.
Every ounce of gold is basically the same as every other ounce. There is no way for a company to create unique value in the gold it produces. And, as such, gold is a commodity that trades based on supply and demand. Physical gold is usually traded in the form of bullion, which is simply a gold bar or coin stamped with the amount of gold it contains and the gold's purity. (Bullion is different than numismatic coins, which are collectibles that often trade based on demand for the specific type of coin and not on their gold content.)    
However, there's a downside as well. Because a miner is running an operating business, you are also facing the risk that things might not work out as planned. As noted above, mines don't always produce as much gold as expected, workers sometimes go on strike, and, unfortunately, mining is risky and disasters can take place that halt production and cost lives. All in all, gold miners can perform better or worse than gold -- depending on what's going on at the specific miner you're looking at.

The price of gold bullion is volatile, but unhedged gold shares and funds are regarded as even higher risk and even more volatile. This additional volatility is due to the inherent leverage in the mining sector. For example, if one owns a share in a gold mine where the costs of production are $300 per ounce and the price of gold is $600, the mine's profit margin will be $300. A 10% increase in the gold price to $660 per ounce will push that margin up to $360, which represents a 20% increase in the mine's profitability, and possibly a 20% increase in the share price. Furthermore, at higher prices, more ounces of gold become economically viable to mine, enabling companies to add to their production. Conversely, share movements also amplify falls in the gold price. For example, a 10% fall in the gold price to $540 will decrease that margin to $240, which represents a 20% fall in the mine's profitability, and possibly a 20% decrease in the share price.
Canadian Gold Maple Leafs: The Royal Canadian Mint provides a variety of gold coins for sale, starting with the flagship and widely recognized Gold Maple Leaf. Canadian Gold Maple Leafs coins are unique in that they are one of the few sovereign gold coins available in denominations of 1/20 ounce. They are also available in 1-ounce, ½ ounce, ¼ ounce, and 1/10 ounce versions. The Mint also produces a “Call of the Wild” series, with 2017 featuring the Canadian Gold Elk. You’ll find Canadian gold coins in a variety of weights, perfect for both new and seasoned investors. The Canadian Royal Mint’s Maplegrams can be broken off into individual grams and also make excellent gifts for loved ones.
(Reader Note: USAGOLD offers an Online Order Desk as a subsidiary service for our clientele. Here you can choose from a full assortment of established investment items including modern gold and silver bullion coins and bullion bars, historic fractional gold coins and historic U.S. gold coins. At our Online Order Desk, you can order confidently any time day or night and on weekends at very competitive rates.)
A real world example here might help. Between Nov. 30, 2007, and June 1, 2009 (the deep 2007-to-2009 recession), the S&P 500 Index fell 36%. The price of gold, on the other hand, rose 25%. That's a particularly dramatic example, but it highlights why investors can benefit from owning gold despite the fact that it is a more volatile investment option. Essentially, when stock prices are going south, gold is likely to be appreciating in value as investors search out safe havens for their cash. 
Local coin and bullion shops may carry various types of bullion bar and coin as well as numismatics and collectibles. Such shops may, however, carry smaller inventories and charge higher premiums compared to online dealers. This makes sense, after all, given the fact the brick and mortar coin shops tend to have higher operating costs compared to online dealers.

Additionally, the metal of kings has been used as currency for centuries. The free market has selected it to be used as money for thousands of years, partly because it is transportable, with a high value-to-weight ratio. Its density makes it more difficult to counterfeit. It is also fungible in that all gold ounces are worth the same.  And it’s divisible, meaning that it does not lose its value just because it is broken into smaller increments.  And it’s durable – not corroding or tarnishing over the years. Historically, the first gold coins were made in Anatolia during the 6th century BC. Most modern bullion coins come in 1 ounce, ½ oz, ¼ oz, 1/10 oz, and even 1/20 oz sizes.
As of 2009 holders of COMEX gold futures have experienced problems taking delivery of their metal. Along with chronic delivery delays, some investors have received delivery of bars not matching their contract in serial number and weight. The delays cannot be easily explained by slow warehouse movements, as the daily reports of these movements show little activity. Because of these problems, there are concerns that COMEX may not have the gold inventory to back its existing warehouse receipts.[55]

Canadian Silver Maple Leaf: First issued in 1988, the Silver Maple Leaf is Canada's official bullion coinage in silver and contains 1 Troy oz of .9999 pure silver. It was the world's first .9999 pure silver bullion coin and remains one of the few issued with this purity level. On the obverse is an effigy of Queen Elizabeth II, while the reverse features the sugar maple leaf design used on all Canadian Maple Leaf coinage.
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