Jack Hunt (NY): 800-877-7424. Minimum purchase of five ounces. Payment must be sent upfront, then the company ships. Coins offered: one-ounce Gold Eagle coins minted in 2011 or past years. The company recently charged 4% over the spot price. With the purchase of 100 coins or more, you get a discount. For example, the markup would be reduced to 3.9% for 100 coins. With an order of 20 or more coins, there’s no shipping fee; for fewer than 20, there’s a $25 flat fee.
The term silver bullion refers to pure silver in bar (ingot), coin, or round form. The term Bullion supposedly came from a French aristocrat named Claude de Bullion, while others have suggested that the term stems from the French word bouillon, which means “boiling” and was perhaps referencing a melting or minting house. Silver bullion products are manufactured to offer investors a convenient means of making investments in precious metals. Below we will take a look at some of the various types of silver bullion available today.
As the oldest form of money, gold is a precious metal that has been prized by civilizations across the world for thousands of years. Gold coins are a staple in the gold bullion industry. They’re valued for both their gold bullion content as well as their design. Gold coins are very eye-appealing, and sovereign coins serve as legal tender in every nation in which they are produced.

A 20-crown gold coin from Norway. Introduced in 1875, it became part of the Scandinavian Monetary Union, which was based on a gold standard. Norwegian gold reserves included tonnes of this and other coins, backing Norway's paper money. The coin was designed for circulation: "124 Stk. 1 Kil. f. G." means that 124 pieces gave one kilogramme of pure gold.
Finally, you'll find as you shop our silver for sale that there are various silver bullion coin programs issued with beautiful finishes, unique weights, and low mintage figures. The designs in these issues are typically offered for a limited time and can feature as a few as one or two designs in a collection, or offer a robust number of different designs. The following are just a few examples of special issue silver bullion coins:
Golden Eagle Coins offers a system making it easy to buy gold online. Simply place an order on our website and this will lock the price in at the time of order. The best way to pay for the product is usually a bank wire, however we accept many different payment methods. Most will vary with processing time, wire transfer being the fastest. Gold can be purchased 24/7, 365 days a year on our website. We also offer local pickup options in the Washington DC, Maryland & Virginia metropolitan area. Gold product prices are tied directly to the world spot gold price and are updated every minute in real-time. Premiums for both coins and gold bars can vary depending on the product as outlined below.
Why sell bullion coins? At some point they will appreciate enough to represent a very attractive source of income. This can boost savings in gold accounts like a precious metals IRA, or offset an investment loss elsewhere. The trick to selling is to get a fair to good price. Trying to win a major sale of the year likely won’t happen, but good sales happen regularly. Research and watching spot market pricing of precious metals is the first step, and selling to reliable buyers is the second. Scottsdale Bullion and Coin, for example, will purchase gold bullion coins at very fair prices, making it a good source to sell gold and silver coins. It is possible to sell privately, but always make sure to get paid first before releasing a coin. And don’t trust credit card payments unless you are protected from chargebacks. Many scammers buy a coin and then claim to their credit card company it was never delivered. The charge gets reversed, and the seller is then out both the coin and the payment.
The 10 gram bar is often popular because it is still quite tiny, but carries an attractive amount of heft to itself. This is because gold as a metal, although soft and malleable, is still quite heavy. The 20 ounce bars are also popular, in part due to their similar feel and weight of the ubiquitous 1 troy ounce gold bar, which actually weighs just over 30 grams. It's even possible to purchase bars that weigh as much as 50 grams or heavier. These are heavy bars but fit well in the palm of one's hand. One advantage of buying bars in larger sizes is that the price-per-ounce ends up being less than if you were to buy exclusively in small amounts. Just like in most commodities, it can be smart to buy gold in bulk.
As alluded to above, investors often make the mistake of buying so-called rare coins. These numismatic or semi-numismatic coins are meant for collectors, speculators, and hobbyists rather than people looking to reliably preserve and build wealth. Rare coin buying is exceedingly risky and often buyers pay inordinately high premiums and do not recoup their value. Rare coins are not really a gold investment… they are more akin to artwork. Some collectors buy coins for pleasure, because of their history or beauty, or because they have excess money to tie up in illiquid assets. Gold coins that are priced close to their actual melt value is a more prudent way to invest in precious metals.

Silver bars may be purchased and stored at home, in safe deposit boxes or in other secure storage facilities, such as third party vaults. Silver bars are typically made from 99.9 percent pure silver, while some producers, like the Royal Canadian Mint for example, use .9999 percent fineness. Silver bars are always stamped with markings to note the purity, manufacturer and weight of the bar. Because of the small premiums over the silver spot price they typically carry, silver bars are one of the most affordable ways to invest in silver bullion.
The grading standards are different in different countries. The main standards applied outside the United States are presented in the following table.[11] Coin grading is not an exact science. It is a subjective exercise and depends on the qualification and the experience of the appraiser. Industry leaders were extremely concerned that without a standardized grading system, the rare coin industry could face enormous problems. Therefore, on February 3, 1986, the Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) was formed and in 1987 the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation. Both associations have the same goal of grading coins. Other prominent grading organizations are the American Numismatic Association Certification Service (ANACS) and the Independent Coin Graders. The grading is usually done by three independent appraisers. A grading finalizer assigns the final grade of the coin and thereafter the coin is sonically sealed in a protective, inert plastic holder known as "slab".[7] Other associations followed and are at present active.[12] This third-party appraisal of a coin's physical condition, backed by a guarantee, and a national network of reputable coin dealers provided an extremely reliable form of protection for rare coin consumers who could then participate in the coin market with greater confidence.

Unallocated gold relates to authorized participants like JPMorgan or Goldman Sachs who trade gold futures. Futures contracts are often bought if the trustee needs to create new shares fast and doesn't have the time to buy and deliver the bullion. Typically allocated gold far outweighs the unallocated gold and the amounts are tallied each day by the custodian. The ETF also has a set amount of time when it must deliver the physical gold into the vault.
You may hear gold bars being measured with the term "troy ounces." This term is meant specifically to measure the weights of precious metals like gold. A troy ounce is about 10 percent heavier than a normal ounce and is not used today outside of measuring precious metals and gem stones. The price of gold fluctuates with the market, and as a result, prices of gold bars will fluctuate as well. Even though the U.S. doesn't adhere to the gold standard anymore, the price of gold is something that a lot of Americans still like to keep a close eye on, as many see it as an indicator of our current economic times. Keen investors tend to keep an eye on the price-per-troy-ounce of gold and invest accordingly.
So it should be pretty clear at this point that gold in and of itself can be a risky investment. But if you use gold appropriately, it can provide an offset to other assets that aren't performing well. And the interplay between gold and those other assets is what helps to create diversified portfolios. No, don't invest 100% of your saving into gold in any form. Yes, consider adding a small allotment of gold to your portfolio. But how should you invest in the metal?
When you pair assets that move differently from each other, you create a more diversified portfolio. This is why mixing bonds with stocks is the foundation of so many portfolios. Bonds have a negative correlation with stocks, meaning they tend to go up when stocks are going down, and vice versa. Here's the interesting thing: Gold's correlation with bonds over the past decade or so is roughly 0.25, still very low. So gold doesn't track along with stocks, and it doesn't track along with bonds, either. Adding a small amount of gold to a stock and bond portfolio -- probably no more than 10% -- can help increase diversification and the ultimate safety of the entire portfolio.
There are both advantages and disadvantages to every investment. If you are opposed to holding physical gold, buying shares in a gold mining company may be a safer alternative. If you believe gold could be a safe bet against inflation, investing in coins, bullion, or jewelry are paths that you can take to gold-based prosperity. Lastly, if your primary interest is in using leverage to profit from rising gold prices, the futures market might be your answer, but note that there is a fair amount of risk associated with any leverage-based holdings.

The two main reasons to invest in bullion coins are to hedge against other market investment forces and to start building future returns. Many gold coin purchases are held for a long-term period versus short trading. This is often so that the investment can recover both value and additional mark ups and commissions charged on coins for sale at the retail level. Even mints charge a markup over the spot price value of a new bullion coin. So some period of wait is needed to let the value appreciate.
Silver has many different uses both industrially and as an investment vehicle. Silver is a very interesting precious metal which has unique malleability, strength and ductility. It can endure extreme temperature changes, and its electrical and thermal conductivity make it extremely versatile in modern industry. The fact is, silver can accomplish things that other elements cannot come close to and, therefore, demand for it is likely to continue to rise. Silver is most commonly used today in electrical components, silver oxide batteries and various areas of radiography
In the early 1970s, one ounce of gold equaled $35. Let's say that at that time, you had a choice of either holding an ounce of gold or simply keeping the $35. They would both buy you the same things, like a brand new business suit or fancy bicycle. However, if you had an ounce of gold today and converted it for today's prices, it would still be enough to buy a brand new suit, but the same cannot be said for the $35. In short, you would have lost a substantial amount of your wealth if you decided to hold the $35 as opposed to the one ounce of gold because the value of gold has increased, while the value of a dollar has been eroded by inflation.
The Market Vectors Junior Gold Miners ETF debuted in 2009. This ETF has become quite popular among investors seeking to have indirect access to gold assets. Although similar to the Gold Miners, the Junior Gold Miners focuses on smaller companies involved in an ongoing search for new sources of gold. Because these companies are less established, there is more risk involved.
For example, gold can be a volatile investment, so you shouldn't put 100% of your assets into a gold investment. The real benefit, for new and experienced investors alike, comes from the diversification that gold can offer; investors often buy gold when stock prices are falling in an attempt to protect their assets. Adding a small amount of gold to your portfolio can materially increase diversification. Although that percentage is up to you, going above 10% would probably be too much exposure unless you have a very strong conviction about the market's future direction.
Streaming and royalty companies. The last option for investing in gold is to buy stock in a streaming and royalty company. For most investors, this is probably the best all-around option for investing in gold, as long as you don't want direct physical exposure to the metal. Streaming and royalty companies like Wheaton Precious Metals Corp. and Royal Gold, Inc. provide miners cash up front for the right to buy gold and other metals from specific mines at reduced rates in the future. They are like specialty finance companies that get paid in gold, allowing them to avoid many of the headaches and risks associated with running a mine.

Mutual funds. Another option for investors who prefer the idea of owning mining stocks over direct gold exposure is to buy a portfolio of miners all at once via a pooled investment. This saves investors the legwork of researching the various mining options and is a simple way to create a diversified portfolio of mining stocks with a single investment. There are a lot of options here, with most major mutual fund houses offering open-end funds that invest in gold miners. Two examples are the Fidelity Select Gold Portfolio and Vanguard Precious Metals Fund. 
A bullion coin is a coin struck from precious metal and kept as a store of value or an investment, rather than used in day-to-day commerce.[1] A bullion coin is distinguished by an explicit statement of weight (or mass) and fineness on the coin; this is because the weight and composition of coins intended for legal tender is specified in the coinage laws of the issuing nation, and therefore there is no need for an explicit statement on the coins themselves. The United Kingdom defines investment coins more specifically as coins that have been minted after 1800, have a purity of not less than 900 thousandths and are, or have been, legal tender in their country of origin.[2] Under United States law, "coins" that fail the last of these requirements are not coins at all,[3] and must be advertised as "rounds" instead. Bullion coins are usually available in both gold and silver[citation needed], with the exceptions of the Krugerrand[4] (note in 2017 the first silver Krugerrand was minted[5]) and the Swiss Vreneli which are only available in gold. The American Eagle and Canadian Gold Maple Leaf series are available in gold, silver and platinum, and palladium.[6][7]
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