If you are buying gold coins in the U.S., chances are good that you will see American Gold Eagle coins for sale. These gold coins are produced by the U.S. Mint, and are one of the world’s most popular gold bullion coins. One of the nicest things about American Gold Eagle coins is that they are available in numerous weights such as 1/10th ounce, ¼ ounce, ½ ounce and 1 ounce.
Holds its value. Gold tends to maintain its value over time. Economists argue that even the price of gold is not indicative of its value. That is, even if the price decreases, the underlying value of gold does not change much. This is largely because there is a fixed quantity of gold due to the fact that it is a commodity, whereas the U.S. dollar, which is a form of fiat currency, holds no inherent value.
Goldline recommends reviewing its Account Agreement, State Addendum and risk disclosure booklet, Coin Facts for Investors and Collectors to Consider, prior to making your purchase. Precious metals and rare coins can increase or decrease in value. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. We believe that precious metals are a long term investment, recognizing any specific holding period may be affected by current market conditions requiring a longer or shorter holding period.

Unlike paper currency that is issued by governments and central banks, silver is backed up by the physical metal itself — and it can be transacted anywhere in the world. In other words, it is a hard and tangible asset. This is what makes silver and other precious metals so attractive. In addition, silver has only a finite supply, which is why the laws of supply and demand are a key factor in precious metals investments today.


The European Commission publishes annually a list of gold coins which must be treated as investment gold coins in all EU Member States. The list has legal force and supplements the law. In the United Kingdom, HM Revenue and Customs have added an additional list of gold coins alongside the European Commission list. These are gold coins that HM Revenue & Customs recognise as falling within the exemption for investment gold coins. This second list does not have legal force.[5]
Thus, even though some bars, coins, and rounds usually command lower premiums over spot, silver coins may warrant a much higher premium because of their collectible value. Also, another reason why coins command a higher premium is – they hold the prestige of being the only government-minted precious metals instruments and thus, enjoy a strong demand in the precious metals market.
Additionally, the metal of kings has been used as currency for centuries. The free market has selected it to be used as money for thousands of years, partly because it is transportable, with a high value-to-weight ratio. Its density makes it more difficult to counterfeit. It is also fungible in that all gold ounces are worth the same.  And it’s divisible, meaning that it does not lose its value just because it is broken into smaller increments.  And it’s durable – not corroding or tarnishing over the years. Historically, the first gold coins were made in Anatolia during the 6th century BC. Most modern bullion coins come in 1 ounce, ½ oz, ¼ oz, 1/10 oz, and even 1/20 oz sizes.
For people who want to ‘play the market,’ i.e. buy and sell regularly to earn immediate profits on every transaction, it is essential to invest in products that can be moved quickly. Although the strategy (buy low and sell high) is simple, investors who want to take this route need to have complete knowledge regarding silver bullion products and the precious metals market, as well as an appetite for risk. Smaller portable investment vehicles such as silver coins and rounds are usually preferred by these types of investors.
While gold rounds may closely resemble coins, they have no currency value.  On the other hand, they are generally priced closer to the spot price than an actual coin in the same size. A gold round comes in sizes that range from 0.05 troy ounces to 1 troy ounce. In most instances, no additional metals are added to rounds. Often, these rounds are not as collectible as actual gold coins.
Stockpiling gold has been a favorite investment of the wealthy through much of history, and gold remains the most popular investment of all the precious metals. Gold is fungible, portable, and accorded value everywhere in the world. This article outlines four ways to invest in gold. The most suitable method for you depends on the amount of money you have to invest, your investment objectives, the amount of risk you can absorb, and the length of time you intend to hold on to your gold.
Step back from those statistics, and it's clear that roughly 90% of gold demand is based on its intrinsic value. This is something of a historical issue, since the world basically chose gold as a currency thousands of years ago. In fact, at one point, most paper money was backed by a country's holdings of physical gold. That time has passed, of course, with fiat currencies now backed by the promise of a government to make good on its obligations.
How exactly does gold get from the ground to the point where you can hold it in your hand? Although panning for gold -- swirling muddy water from streams around in a pan in the hopes of finding gold flakes -- was a common practice during the California Gold Rush, nowadays the precious metal is generally mined from the ground. While gold can be found by itself, it's far more common to find it with other metals, including silver and copper. Thus, a miner may actually produce gold as a by-product of its other mining efforts, or be focused exclusively on gold but produce copper and silver as by-products.

A. A solid, professional gold firm can go a long way in helping the investor shortcut the learning curve. A good gold firm can help you avoid some the problems and pitfalls encountered along the way, and provide some direction. It can help you in the beginning and through the course of your gold ownership both in making additions to your portfolio and liquidations.
United States Gold Bureau is a private distributor of Gold, Silver & Platinum coins from the U.S. Mint and is not affiliated with the U.S. Government. Information on this web site is intended for educational purpose only and is not to be used as investment advice or a recommendation to buy sell or trade any asset that requires a licensed broker. As with all investments there is risk and the past performance of a particular asset class does not guarantee any future performance. The United States Gold Bureau, principals and representatives do not guarantee to clients that they will realize a profit or guarantee that losses may not be incurred as a result of following its coin collecting recommendations, or upon liquidation of coins bought from the U.S. Gold Bureau. All content and images are owned by USGB and may not be reproduced without written authorization.
Answer. We probably get that question more than any other -- pretty much on a daily basis. The answer, however, is not as straightforward as you might think. What you buy depends upon your goals. We usually answer the "What should I buy?" question with one of our own: "Why are you interested in buying gold?" If your goal is simply to hedge financial uncertainty and/or capitalize on price movement, then contemporary bullion coins will serve your purposes. Those concerned with the possibility of capital controls and a gold seizure, or call-in, often include historic pre-1933 gold coins in the mix. Both categories carry modest premiums over their gold melt value, track the gold price, and enjoy strong liquidity internationally.
Silver coins are sold at a premium above Silver spot prices because of their unique designs and limited availability. Coins are usually sold in brilliant uncirculated condition, having not been used as actual currency. Once a coin loses its luster, it begins to lose its status in terms of condition. The highest quality Silver bullion coins are known as proof coins. Popular for their intricate designs, proof coins are struck more than once, which leads to their brilliant shine.
Gold coins price is based on the weight of the precious metal and the scarcity of the coin itself. The scarcity arises from the fact that once a mintage of a coin is done for a specific year there will never be another coin of that year produced. Minted coins also offer the guarantee that comes from a reputable mint like the U.S. Mint. Gold coins are generally legal tender in the country that the coin was minted.
Gold has been one of the most prized substances known to man since before recorded history. We're lucky today because we have a myriad number of ways to own gold, many of which are just a click or a phone call away here at MCM. From ancient coins through world coins, Classic U.S. Gold and modern gold coins from the U.S. Mint and mints around the world, they're all here for you today.
However much also depends on the way in which you invest in gold. There are many forms of gold investment, offering the opportunity to pin your wealth on the fluctuations of the gold price. Issuers of assets such as gold ETFs, unallocated gold bullion and gold futures will use gold's reputation as a secure and dependable commodity as a reason to invest in their product. However, despite being backed by gold, these contracts do not entitle the investor to any amount of physical gold. The validity and worth of such investments are ultimately dependent on the performance of the organisations issuing the contracts and, in the same way as any other paper or electronic asset, are vulnerable to entirely losing their value. For access to the long-term financial security offered by precious metals, then, the safest way is to invest in allocated, physical bullion bars and coins.
For most of history, coins were valued based on the precious metal they contain. Whether a coin was actually made by the party as claimed was of secondary importance compared to whether it contains the correct amount of metal – that is, correct weight and fineness (purity). Genuine appearance was simply a convenient shortcut to avoid time-consuming tests in everyday transactions.
The first paper bank notes were gold certificates. They were first issued in the 17th century when they were used by goldsmiths in England and the Netherlands for customers who kept deposits of gold bullion in their vault for safe-keeping. Two centuries later, the gold certificates began being issued in the United States when the US Treasury issued such certificates that could be exchanged for gold. The United States Government first authorized the use of the gold certificates in 1863. On April 5, 1933 the US Government restricted the private gold ownership in the United States and therefore, the gold certificates stopped circulating as money (this restriction was reversed on January 1, 1975). Nowadays, gold certificates are still issued by gold pool programs in Australia and the United States, as well as by banks in Germany, Switzerland and Vietnam.[53]

Leveraged Investment Scams – Leveraged investments are high-risk investments that can result in the loss of even more money than you originally invested. Typically, in a leveraged investment scam, a telemarketer or website will state that the price of metal is about to skyrocket and that you can make significant profits by making a small down payment for the metal, often as low as 20 percent. According to the marketer, by paying only 20 percent of the purchase price, you can get more metal than if you had to pay 100 percent of the purchase price.


The reason gold benefits from a declining U.S. dollar is because gold is priced in U.S. dollars globally. There are two reasons for this relationship. First, investors who are looking at buying gold (i.e., central banks) must sell their U.S. dollars to make this transaction. This ultimately drives the U.S. dollar lower as global investors seek to diversify out of the dollar. The second reason has to do with the fact that a weakening dollar makes gold cheaper for investors who hold other currencies. This results in greater demand from investors who hold currencies that have appreciated relative to the U.S. dollar.
The most obvious answer is to run out and buy some gold coins, bars, or jewelry. This isn't the best option for investors. For example, there's a huge markup on jewelry, which makes it a very bad investment choice. But there's also likely to be a markup on coins and bars that gets put into the price quoted from dealers. After all, they have to make a living and be compensated for acting as the intermediary between buyers and sellers.
Gold mining stocks have their benefits and their drawbacks, and aren't the purest way to own gold. If you choose to take this route, you'll want to pay close attention to a company's mining costs, existing mine portfolio, and expansion opportunities at both existing and new assets. All of these will play a role in determining what an investor is willing to pay for a gold miner's stock (in addition to the spot price of the metal itself, of course).
*The information contained on sbcgold.com has been prepared by Scottsdale Bullion & Coin for informational purposes only. It is not intended to provide, and should not be relied upon for; investment, legal, accounting or tax advice. Please consult with a professional who may specialize in these areas regarding the applicability of this information to your individual situation. The trademarks and registered trademarks are property of their respective owners.
Gold jewelry: The problem with buying gold jewelry as an investment is that you pay a premium for the craftsmanship and the desirability of the design. Any piece of jewelry marked 14 karat or less will be below investment quality, and any resale for the sake of investing will be impacted by the need to refine the gold. On the other hand, it is possible to pick up antique or vintage gold for very little at estate sales and similar auctions where a seller may not recognize the true value of the metal content or if people simply aren't in the mood to bid much for it. Older pieces can carry more value due to their unique craftsmanship, so this can be a lucrative and enjoyable way to collect gold.
Finally, you'll find as you shop our silver for sale that there are various silver bullion coin programs issued with beautiful finishes, unique weights, and low mintage figures. The designs in these issues are typically offered for a limited time and can feature as a few as one or two designs in a collection, or offer a robust number of different designs. The following are just a few examples of special issue silver bullion coins:
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