Gold has been used as a form of money for thousands of years. Because of gold's luster, rarity, and its uncommon density (no other precious metal outside the platinum group is as heavy); it became the medium for trading. Gold also inspired the concept of money: compact, confidential, and changeless. Throughout the thousands of years that have passed, gold has only become more favored over other means of currency.
One of the most affordable ways to get gold is the Lady Liberty round, made of .9999 pure (24 karats) gold in one-tenth troy ounce. They are not legal tender and the goal is to provide the buyer with more gold for the money versus fractional coin bullion. Lady Liberty is featured on the obverse with the image of a descending bald eagle on the reverse.
The U.S. government continued on with this gold tradition by establishing a bimetallic standard in 1792. The bimetallic standard simply stated that every monetary unit in the U.S. had to be backed by either gold or silver. For example, one U.S. dollar was the equivalent of 24.75 grains of gold. In other words, the coins that were used as money simply represented the gold (or silver) that was presently deposited at the bank.

Gold bars can refer to a multitude of different things. Also called ingots or bullion, a gold bar in the most simple terms is gold of certain purity that has been formed into the shape of a rectangular cube. However, there are a lot more terms that can be applied to better describe a gold bar. For instance, if a gold bar is minted, that means it went through a more rigorous creation process. It involves a bank or refinery cutting the gold into set dimensions. In this way, minted gold bars should all be precise in regards to dimensions and purity. A cast bar is easier to make. It merely involves pouring the melted gold into a mold and then letting it form and harden into a bar form. Since these bars aren't cut to specific dimensions, cast bars may be unevenly shaped and vary slightly in appearance from bar to bar. It's often common for cast bars to be handled differently than minted bars. A mint bar will frequently be sealed in a protective packaging whereas a cast bar is more likely to be handled directly.
Though this interview will help you start safely on the road to gold ownership, it is just an overview. If you would like more detailed information, I would recommend my book, The ABCs of Gold Investing: How to Protect and Build Your Wealth With Gold, which covers the who, what, when, where, why and how of gold ownership in detail. You can also shortcut the learning curve by contacting our offices and asking to speak with one of our expert client advisors who will be happy to answer your questions and help you get off to a solid start.
Biblical Silver Coins: Issued for the nation of Niue by the Scottsdale Mint, the Biblical Silver Coin Series launched in 2015 and includes six new designs each year. The silver coins feature images reflective of stories from the Hebrew and Christian bibles, with each design struck on a 2 oz, rimless silver blank with an antique polish. Each design is limited to just 1,499 coins.
Gold certificates. Gold certificates are another option for "owning" gold that is best placed in the bullion category but merits a little explanation. Gold certificates are notes issued by a company that owns gold. Effectively, the note provides the buyer with direct exposure to the metal, but it doesn't require the physical ownership of the metal, which the note issuer keeps safely under lock and key.

APMEX: (OK) 405-595-2100 and press 1 unless you want to be on hold forever. For purchases of one to 19 coins there is a 5% markup; for 20 to 99 coins it’s 4.8%; for 100 or more it’s 4%. You must open a free online account. You’ll pay $25 shipping for orders under $25,000; shipping is free if you buy more. Payment by check or wire transfer is preferred.
Market timing is difficult for any investment. That is one reason many investors look beyond day-to-day price movements and buy physical Gold or Silver as long-term investments. When planning to hold an asset like physical Gold for 3-5 years or more, it is less important to consider the current cost of the metal and more important to examine its historical performance in relation to other investments.
Buying from a local dealer and buying online may be two very different things. Brick and mortar coin dealers will often have significantly higher dealer premiums associated with their products. Online dealers, such as Silver.com, often have much lower overhead and move more inventory thus allowing us to offer bullion products for lower prices. To see what others are saying about buying precious metals online from us, you can read some customer reviews of Silver.com.

We have also stayed committed to investors wanting the highest level of education on the how and why to invest in gold and silver. Whether you want to stay up-to-date with live spot prices or analyze historical gold and silver price charts; or maybe you want to understand gold investing fundamentals or silver investing fundamentals; we have it covered.
Finally, you'll find as you shop our silver for sale that there are various silver bullion coin programs issued with beautiful finishes, unique weights, and low mintage figures. The designs in these issues are typically offered for a limited time and can feature as a few as one or two designs in a collection, or offer a robust number of different designs. The following are just a few examples of special issue silver bullion coins:
Silver has many different uses both industrially and as an investment vehicle. Silver is a very interesting precious metal which has unique malleability, strength and ductility. It can endure extreme temperature changes, and its electrical and thermal conductivity make it extremely versatile in modern industry. The fact is, silver can accomplish things that other elements cannot come close to and, therefore, demand for it is likely to continue to rise. Silver is most commonly used today in electrical components, silver oxide batteries and various areas of radiography
Why sell bullion coins? At some point they will appreciate enough to represent a very attractive source of income. This can boost savings in gold accounts like a precious metals IRA, or offset an investment loss elsewhere. The trick to selling is to get a fair to good price. Trying to win a major sale of the year likely won’t happen, but good sales happen regularly. Research and watching spot market pricing of precious metals is the first step, and selling to reliable buyers is the second. Scottsdale Bullion and Coin, for example, will purchase gold bullion coins at very fair prices, making it a good source to sell gold and silver coins. It is possible to sell privately, but always make sure to get paid first before releasing a coin. And don’t trust credit card payments unless you are protected from chargebacks. Many scammers buy a coin and then claim to their credit card company it was never delivered. The charge gets reversed, and the seller is then out both the coin and the payment.
Gold bullion is produced in the form of Gold coins, Gold bars and Gold rounds from mints and Precious Metal refiners around the world. When Gold buying, you invest in an asset class that is as old as civilization itself. For thousands of years, Gold bullion has held stable purchasing power during inflationary times but can play an important role in a modern portfolio. Gold prices generally move independent of stocks and can provide a bright spot in your investment portfolio during an economic downturn.
A real world example here might help. Between Nov. 30, 2007, and June 1, 2009 (the deep 2007-to-2009 recession), the S&P 500 Index fell 36%. The price of gold, on the other hand, rose 25%. That's a particularly dramatic example, but it highlights why investors can benefit from owning gold despite the fact that it is a more volatile investment option. Essentially, when stock prices are going south, gold is likely to be appreciating in value as investors search out safe havens for their cash. 
To buy gold bullion or silver bullion for numismatic value, one needs to have a very good understanding of the collectable market. Often times, values will vary significantly from year to year. Remember, unlike a bullion price, a collectible coin is only worth what it can be sold for. Many buyers have been burned spending lots of money for a “collectable” and then selling it for far less.
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The Austrian Philharmonics made their debut in 1989. These Gold coins depict the famous Great Pipe Organ from one of the most notable concert orchestras in the world. The reverse features a cadre of musical instruments. The Austrian Philharmonic coins are popular with investors all over the world for their high Gold content and unique depictions of the world-renowned orchestra. Multiple sizes are also available for these coins, including a 1/25 oz Gold coin.
Investors and experts have often recommend that 10% to 20% of an investor’s assets should be invested in precious metals but the reasons for investing don’t stop there. Throughout history, precious metals, including gold, have been a solid hedge against a declining U.S. dollar. Along with this comes the security which gold has to offer during times of war, political strife and uncertainty. Simply look to 2009, though a recession occurred, gold experienced a 25% increase. This safe-haven investment could also offer outstanding price appreciation and profit.
Avoid rare coins. Rare coins require more diligence and expertise when buying them, Mladjenovic says. Two coins may look alike but have completely different grades. This difference can add up to thousands of dollars. You should hire a professional grading service and get a certificate of authenticity when buying rare coins — a hassle for most investors.
The primary benefits to gold bullion bars for gold buyers are diversity and affordability. Gold bullion bars have lower premiums over the spot price of gold when compared to gold bullion coins, and the variety of options is far more diverse. Gold bullion bars are available not only in the aforementioned weights, but also styles including cast, hand-poured, and minted ingots. Gold bullion bars are struck continuously to meet the demand for gold, with the following refineries and mints representing some of the greatest refiners of gold bars:
Did you know you can even use your gold in conjunction with your IRA account? If you're interested in a self-directed gold IRA, you can call one of our experts at (800)775-3504. And in order to keep up with just how much the value is changing day-to-day, the savvy investor needs to keep a close eye on the price of gold and other precious metals. We offer constant coverage with our live price tracker. You can even sign up for price updates and a portfolio tracker. If you're at all curious about getting involved in investing with gold, take a look through our site and map out the best potential strategy relative to your investment goals.
For people who want to ‘play the market,’ i.e. buy and sell regularly to earn immediate profits on every transaction, it is essential to invest in products that can be moved quickly. Even though this is a well-known strategy, timing the market is harder than it seems. For investors who want to buy and sell at a moment’s notice, portability plays an important role in their product choices. However, a healthy risk appetite is required for playing the market. These investors mostly prefer smaller, more portable gold investment vehicles such as coins and rounds.
Although governments have decided it's easier to be off the gold standard than on it, that doesn't change the central issue that backs gold's intrinsic value and safe-haven status: There's only so much gold in the world. The gold that's above ground being used in some fashion is estimated to be around 190,000 metric tons. The amount of gold in the ground that can be economically mined today is notably less, at roughly 54,000 metric tons.    
Gold has been used throughout history as money and has been a relative standard for currency equivalents specific to economic regions or countries, until recent times. Many European countries implemented gold standards in the latter part of the 19th century until these were temporarily suspended in the financial crises involving World War I.[3] After World War II, the Bretton Woods system pegged the United States dollar to gold at a rate of US$35 per troy ounce. The system existed until the 1971 Nixon Shock, when the US unilaterally suspended the direct convertibility of the United States dollar to gold and made the transition to a fiat currency system. The last major currency to be divorced from gold was the Swiss Franc in 2000.[4]
The most traditional way of investing in gold is by buying bullion gold bars. In some countries, like Canada, Austria, Liechtenstein and Switzerland, these can easily be bought or sold at the major banks. Alternatively, there are bullion dealers that provide the same service. Bars are available in various sizes. For example, in Europe, Good Delivery bars are approximately 400 troy ounces (12 kg).[38] 1 kilogram (32 ozt) are also popular, although many other weights exist, such as the 10oz, 1oz, 10 g, 100 g, 1 kg, 1 Tael, and 1 Tola.
Answer. Futures contracts are generally considered one of the most speculative arenas in the investment marketplace. The investor's exposure to the market is leveraged and the moves both up and down are greatly exaggerated. Something like 9 out of 10 investors who enter the futures market come away losers. For someone looking to hedge his or her portfolio against economic and financial risk, this is a poor substitute for owning the metal itself.
Prudential Securities: (NY) 212-778-6667. A small investor can open up an account by buying at least 20 ounces. Most clients come from Wells Fargo (Prudential and Wells Fargo have ties), and the company normally doesn’t sell to other individual investors. “We kind of discourage that,” we were told. But you can do it. The purchase has to be made through a wire transfer -- no checks, no charge cards -- and the company does a background check. Prudential buys for 3% and sells the gold marked up for 3.15%. The person we spoke with said the average trade was 50 to 100 ounces. No discount for bulk purchases.
As the Vanguard fund's name implies, however, in a fund's portfolio you are likely to find exposure to miners that deal with other precious, semiprecious, and base metals. That's not materially different than owning mining stocks directly, but you should keep this factor in mind, because not all fund names make this clear. The name of the Fidelity fund, for example, might make you believe that it invests only in companies that mine gold, which isn't the case.
This allows those customers to determine the value of their own collections as well as the fairness of a listed price; again, in order to make the customer a bigger part in their own gold or silver buying experience. They have several Dallas locations at 6174 Sherry Lane Dallas, TX 75225, phone number (972)481-3800, as well as locations outside Dallas in Allen, Fort Worth, Euless, Arlington and Southlake Texas.
The Royal Mint of England anchors its gold bullion coins with the British Gold Britannia coins. Introduced in 1987, the Gold Britannia features a reverse design created by artist Philip Nathan. Britannia has previously featured on various British coins, but Nathan’s reverse design introduced for these gold bullion coins brought a new, powerful vision of Britannia to British coinage. The obverse features new images of Queen Elizabeth II updated throughout her reign to accurately reflect her age. You’ll also find the Queen’s Beast Series of gold coins available from the Royal Mint, which include:
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