The U.S. Government, including the United States Mint (the sponsoring Federal Agency of usmint.gov), neither endorses nor guarantees in any way the external organizations, services, advice, or products included in these website links. Furthermore, the U.S. Government neither controls nor guarantees the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of the information contained in non-government website links.
Gold maintains a special position in the market with many tax regimes. For example, in the European Union the trading of recognised gold coins and bullion products are free of VAT. Silver and other precious metals or commodities do not have the same allowance. Other taxes such as capital gains tax may also apply for individuals depending on their tax residency. U.S. citizens may be taxed on their gold profits at collectibles or capital gains rates, depending on the investment vehicle used.[61]
A. A solid, professional gold firm can go a long way in helping the investor shortcut the learning curve. A good gold firm can help you avoid some the problems and pitfalls encountered along the way, and provide some direction. It can help you in the beginning and through the course of your gold ownership both in making additions to your portfolio and liquidations.
“ For the first time buying coins off the internet, I am more than pleased. Coins came in the quality promised and in the time frame that was stated with secure delivery. Also the prices and selections are good with excellent service. Since I will be buying again from Golden Eagle and can without resevation recommend it to other individuals. Sincerely, Wayne Schenk ”
In order to fully understand the purpose of gold, one must look back to the start of the gold market. While gold's history began in 3000 B.C, when the ancient Egyptians started forming jewelry, it wasn't until 560 B.C. that gold started to act as a currency. At that time, merchants wanted to create a standardized and easily transferable form of money that would simplify trade. The creation of a gold coin stamped with a seal seemed to be the answer, as gold jewelry was already widely accepted and recognized throughout various corners of the earth.

"Gold's return is solely based on the price going up. Thus when you sell gold you create a capital gain, that in most cases will be taxed at the more favorable capital gains tax rate," he says. "However, if one invests in gold in a tax-deferred account, the gains one receives will be taxed based on their income tax bracket, which is typically higher than their capital gains rate. So if an investor does want to own gold it should be done using taxable assets."
Now that you understand why buying Gold is a good use of your investment dollar, you may need guidance regarding how to buy physical Gold. Luckily, buying physical Gold is simple. If you choose an established, well-regarded Precious Metals company, you can buy with confidence. Buying physical Gold should be an enjoyable part of your investment journey. Consider working with APMEX to experience the thrill of buying physical Gold free from worry. A common first purchase is the Gold American Eagle, one of the most popular Gold bullion items with investors.
Southwest Numismatic Corp. is a PCGS authorized dealer operating by appointment only. Though they have little internet presence, they are known for high-grade coins at reasonable prices. They specialize in rare coins including early U.S. coins, such as copper, small cents, and colonial or territorial issues. Southwest Numismatic also deals in ancient and foreign coins, paper currency, and gold and silver bullion coins.
Gold mining stocks have their benefits and their drawbacks, and aren't the purest way to own gold. If you choose to take this route, you'll want to pay close attention to a company's mining costs, existing mine portfolio, and expansion opportunities at both existing and new assets. All of these will play a role in determining what an investor is willing to pay for a gold miner's stock (in addition to the spot price of the metal itself, of course).

Native American Silver Dollar Coins: An ideal example of special-issue silver coins, the Native American Silver Dollar Coins are proof silver coins issued by the Native American Mint. The coins have a face value of One Dollar, and though they are not legal tender in the United States, the face value is backed by the issuing tribe. Each new design represents an indigenous tribe from North America with an obverse design of the tribe and a reverse design of an animal species special to that tribe's history.


The Austrian Mint is responsible for issuing one of the first great gold bullion coin programs. Debuting in 1989, the Austrian Gold Philharmonic is the nation’s official gold coin and reflects the arts and culture of Austria as represented by the Vienna Philharmonic orchestra. The Gold Philharmonic coins debuted in 1989 with 1 oz and 1/4 oz options, and over time has grown to include 1/10 oz (1991), 1/2 oz (1994), and 1/25 oz (2014) coins. Gold Philharmonic coins had face values in Austrian Schillings from 1989 to 2001, and following the adoption of the European Union common currency in 2002 issued the coins with face values in Euros (€). The Austrian Gold Philharmonic has the following designs:

The Royal Mint of England anchors its gold bullion coins with the British Gold Britannia coins. Introduced in 1987, the Gold Britannia features a reverse design created by artist Philip Nathan. Britannia has previously featured on various British coins, but Nathan’s reverse design introduced for these gold bullion coins brought a new, powerful vision of Britannia to British coinage. The obverse features new images of Queen Elizabeth II updated throughout her reign to accurately reflect her age. You’ll also find the Queen’s Beast Series of gold coins available from the Royal Mint, which include:

If you want more risk, try exchange-traded notes, debt instruments that track an index. You give a bank money for an allotted amount of time and, upon maturity, the bank pays you a return based on the performance of what the ETN is based on, in this case the gold futures market. Some of the more popular ones are UBS Bloomberg CMCI Gold ETN ( UBG), DB Gold Double Short ETN ( DZZ), DB Gold Short ETN ( DGZ) and DB Gold Double Long ETN ( DGP).


Local coin and bullion shops may carry various types of bullion bar and coin as well as numismatics and collectibles. Such shops may, however, carry smaller inventories and charge higher premiums compared to online dealers. This makes sense, after all, given the fact the brick and mortar coin shops tend to have higher operating costs compared to online dealers.
Buying Gold bars is one of the most cost-effective, safest and easiest ways to own physical Gold. Gold bars generally match sovereign coins in content and purity, but cost less over Gold spot price than Gold coins because they’re usually minted privately. APMEX sells Gold bars produced by Heraeus, Credit Suisse, Valcambi, Perth Mint and other respected Gold companies. Each Gold bar is stamped with its exact Gold weight, fineness and a serial number for added security.

With 9 locations throughout the greater Dallas area, this is one of the region’s largest precious metal dealers. Dallas Gold & Silver Exchange buys all forms of gold, silver, and platinum. They also deal in rare coins and paper currency. Their inventory includes more than 250 bullion products such as the American Eagle, Canadian Maple Leaf, South African Krugerrand, Credit Suisse gold bars, kilo silver bars, and more. The stock of rare and collectible coins at Dallas Gold & Silver exchange includes PCGS and NGC certified coins, raw coins, proof and mint sets, and silver dollars. Many of their rarest coins can be viewed and purchased through their website.
New investors will find great comfort and emotional attachment from buying Silver coins. You can expect to pay more for a Silver coin than its Silver bullion counterparts, but because of the coin’s scarcity and collectibility, you’ll have a more fulfilling buying experience. There is almost an unlimited variety of Silver coins for your investing pleasure.

Exchange-traded funds, or ETFs, are investment companies that are legally classified as open-end companies or unit investment trusts (UITs), but that differ from traditional open-end companies and UITs.[51] The main differences are that ETFs do not sell directly to investors and they issue their shares in what are called "Creation Units" (large blocks such as blocks of 50,000 shares). Also, the Creation Units may not be purchased with cash but a basket of securities that mirrors the ETF's portfolio. Usually, the Creation Units are split up and re-sold on a secondary market.
A. Over the past few years, as concern about a financial and economic breakdown spread, there were periods of gold coin bottlenecks and actual shortages. In 2008-2009 at the height of the financial crisis, demand was so great that the national mints could not keep up with it. The flow of historic gold coins from Europe was also insufficient to meet accelerating demand both there and in the United States. Premiums shot-up on all gold and silver coins and a scramble developed for what was available. There is an old saying that the best time to buy gold is when everything is quiet. I would underline that sentiment.
As alluded to above, investors often make the mistake of buying so-called rare coins. These numismatic or semi-numismatic coins are meant for collectors, speculators, and hobbyists rather than people looking to reliably preserve and build wealth. Rare coin buying is exceedingly risky and often buyers pay inordinately high premiums and do not recoup their value. Rare coins are not really a gold investment… they are more akin to artwork. Some collectors buy coins for pleasure, because of their history or beauty, or because they have excess money to tie up in illiquid assets. Gold coins that are priced close to their actual melt value is a more prudent way to invest in precious metals.

Silver coins are sold at a premium above Silver spot prices because of their unique designs and limited availability. Coins are usually sold in brilliant uncirculated condition, having not been used as actual currency. Once a coin loses its luster, it begins to lose its status in terms of condition. The highest quality Silver bullion coins are known as proof coins. Popular for their intricate designs, proof coins are struck more than once, which leads to their brilliant shine.

As you would have probably figured out by now, all forms of silver bullion products have their purpose in an investment portfolio. Hence, a safe and recommended strategy is to allocate a specific ratio (depending on you or the advice of your financial adviser) of every type of silver bullion instrument in your tangible assets. However, it is an entirely personal decision that one must take after careful deliberation.
Gold has been used as money for many reasons. It is fungible, with a low spread between the prices to buy and sell. Gold is also easily transportable, as it has a high value to weight ratio, compared to other commodities, such as silver. Gold can be re-coined, divided into smaller units, or re-melted into larger units such as gold bars, without destroying its metal value. The density of gold is higher than most other metals, making it difficult to pass counterfeits. Additionally, gold is extremely unreactive, hence it does not tarnish or corrode over time.
Bullion coins can be defined as high-grade precious metals coins suitable for investment purposes. Bullion coins are predominantly issued by a government agency, however, there are some cases where coins are produced by private institutions. That said, in almost all cases, the coin is almost completely made of a precious metal (90% purity and above), it has the amount of that metal stamped on the coin based on a standard metric, and it is also stamped by the agency that created the coin. So, for example, a Gold Eagle is crafted by the U.S. mint, authorized by the U.S. government, and has both the weight (1 troy ounce) and the purity, in some cases, included on its surface (see the Gold Buffalo issued by the U.S. mint).
In 1967, the Gold Krugerrand was struck in South Africa. It was the first modern gold bullion coin struck anywhere, and in the following years countries like Canada and China followed the Krugerrand with their own bullion gold coins, the Gold Maple Leaf and the Gold Panda. Although a latecomer, the American Gold Eagle joined the others in 1986 and quickly became the most popular gold coin in the world.

Then there's the question of how to own it, which is equally complicated, with coins and bullion, ETFs, mutual funds, miners, and streaming companies among the various investment options. However, if you take some time to get to know gold and the different ways in which you can get exposure to the metal, I think you'll find that it isn't as risky as some people think and deserves a small place in your otherwise diversified portfolio.


Investing always requires some careful research. Investors in bullion coins need to be aware that physical assets come with ongoing storage costs, whether that is more insurance coverage for home storage or an ongoing rental of secure storage like a safety deposit box. Beyond keeping coins safe, investors need to approach the secondary market with caution as coin dealers may charge higher premiums based on numismatic factors. Shopping around for dealers with the smallest premiums over melt value is a good first step. It is also recommended to stick with the higher weight coins, as the 1 once coins trade at less of a premium over spot prices than smaller, more affordable coins. Of course, if you aren't solely interested in buying near the melt value, then bullion coins are more a collectible investment than a precious metals diversification play. In which case, best of luck - you may well need it.
Although central banks do not generally announce gold purchases in advance, some, such as Russia, have expressed interest in growing their gold reserves again as of late 2005.[22] In early 2006, China, which only holds 1.3% of its reserves in gold,[23] announced that it was looking for ways to improve the returns on its official reserves. Some bulls hope that this signals that China might reposition more of its holdings into gold, in line with other central banks. Chinese investors began pursuing investment in gold as an alternative to investment in the Euro after the beginning of the Eurozone crisis in 2011. China has since become the world’s top gold consumer as of 2013.[24]
Once you've built your gold position, you should strongly consider keeping it a core portion of your portfolio. That, of course, comes with a caveat: If you target a 10% allocation to gold, then once a year or so you'll want to revisit that allocation to make sure it's still roughly where you want it. If gold is having a good year and your position has increased to 12% or more of your portfolio, it's wise to sell some of the position to bring it back to 10%, and put the resulting cash into other investments. Conversely, if your gold position falls to 8% or so, then you may want to add to it to bring it back to your 10% target. This is really just simple portfolio rebalancing, but it's an important maintenance issue that you shouldn't forget about.   
The term silver bullion refers to pure silver in bar (ingot), coin, or round form. The term Bullion supposedly came from a French aristocrat named Claude de Bullion, while others have suggested that the term stems from the French word bouillon, which means “boiling” and was perhaps referencing a melting or minting house. Silver bullion products are manufactured to offer investors a convenient means of making investments in precious metals. Below we will take a look at some of the various types of silver bullion available today.
Gold certificates. Gold certificates are another option for "owning" gold that is best placed in the bullion category but merits a little explanation. Gold certificates are notes issued by a company that owns gold. Effectively, the note provides the buyer with direct exposure to the metal, but it doesn't require the physical ownership of the metal, which the note issuer keeps safely under lock and key.
If you store your gold at home, invest in a decent safe. Practice good "safe hygiene." Bolt it to the floor out of sight of windows. Don't leave the combination on a Post-It note on the side of the safe. A reasonably large, fire-resistant safe will cost less than an ounce of gold (at recent prices) and can also be used to store important documents.
For those that appreciate how gold works to improve investment reward vs volatility/risk in a portfolio, it is recommended that a minimum of 10% of an investment portfolio should be in gold, or other precious metals. However, investors often purchase more when economic or geopolitical uncertainty in the markets and around the world rises. Mathematically, “How Much Gold” over time would have suggested preferred diversification is close to 10%, but certainly your preferred mix of assets is dictated by your personal views and preferences.
Mutual funds. Another option for investors who prefer the idea of owning mining stocks over direct gold exposure is to buy a portfolio of miners all at once via a pooled investment. This saves investors the legwork of researching the various mining options and is a simple way to create a diversified portfolio of mining stocks with a single investment. There are a lot of options here, with most major mutual fund houses offering open-end funds that invest in gold miners. Two examples are the Fidelity Select Gold Portfolio and Vanguard Precious Metals Fund. 
Gold bars are often the least expensive form of bullion and are perfect for large purchases. They’re often easier to store and ship. 1-ounce coins are probably one of the most common and instantly recognized forms of gold. Coins allow investors to buy batches of gold in smaller increments (though there are also 1-ounce bars). Coins can sometimes be more convenient to liquidate, since you can sell off your gold savings one ounce at a time, rather than finding a buyer for a large bar of gold.
Gold shows typically deal more in numismatic, or collector coins, which have high markups, are illiquid, and are valued based more on rarity or historical significance than gold content. If a dealer does have any bullion, it is likely to be a limited selection. While numismatics can be a good investment, it takes a tremendous amount of research to avoid being taken advantage of by an unscrupulous dealer.
The Royal Mint of England anchors its gold bullion coins with the British Gold Britannia coins. Introduced in 1987, the Gold Britannia features a reverse design created by artist Philip Nathan. Britannia has previously featured on various British coins, but Nathan’s reverse design introduced for these gold bullion coins brought a new, powerful vision of Britannia to British coinage. The obverse features new images of Queen Elizabeth II updated throughout her reign to accurately reflect her age. You’ll also find the Queen’s Beast Series of gold coins available from the Royal Mint, which include:
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