The value of numismatic coins is determined by features such as condition, age, rarity and the number of coins originally minted. An example of a coveted collector's coin is the Spur Royal. The grade of the coin also matters, which is a numerical score assigned based on a visual evaluation of the amount of wear. Basic grades are good, fine, and un-circulated. The Universal rarity scale and the Sheldon rarity scale are the scales used to determine how rare a coin might be.
Silver is produced in the form of Silver coins, Silver bars and Silver rounds from mints and Precious Metal refiners around the world. Silver is one of the world’s most important commodities and an affordable Precious Metal investment option. For thousands of years, Silver bullion has served as a primary monetary metal, but today it is most commonly used as an industrial commodity. As an investment, Silver can play an important role in a modern diversified portfolio. Silver prices generally move independent of stocks and can provide a bright spot in your investment portfolio during an economic downturn.
The weight and dimensions of a coin of .999 fineness such as the Maple Leaf cannot be replicated precisely by a gold plated tungsten core, since tungsten has only 99.74% of the specific gravity of gold. However, forgeries of alloyed gold coins (such as American gold eagle or Krugerrand made from a crown gold alloy with 22 karats = .917 fineness) may have correct the correct weight and dimensions because of the lesser density of the alloy. Such forgeries can be detected testing the acoustic, electric resistance or magnetic properties. The latter method uses the fact that gold is weakly diamagnetic and tungsten is weakly paramagnetic. The effect is weak so that testing requires strong neodymium magnets and sensitive conditions (e.g., a gold coin hanging from 2 m long pendulum or placed on styrofoam floating on water), such tests can be performed without special equipment.[22] Forgeries using gold plated tungsten are also used in counterfeiting of gold bars.
Gold bullion is produced in the form of Gold coins, Gold bars and Gold rounds from mints and Precious Metal refiners around the world. When Gold buying, you invest in an asset class that is as old as civilization itself. For thousands of years, Gold bullion has held stable purchasing power during inflationary times but can play an important role in a modern portfolio. Gold prices generally move independent of stocks and can provide a bright spot in your investment portfolio during an economic downturn.
Answer. We probably get that question more than any other -- pretty much on a daily basis. The answer, however, is not as straightforward as you might think. What you buy depends upon your goals. We usually answer the "What should I buy?" question with one of our own: "Why are you interested in buying gold?" If your goal is simply to hedge financial uncertainty and/or capitalize on price movement, then contemporary bullion coins will serve your purposes. Those concerned with the possibility of capital controls and a gold seizure, or call-in, often include historic pre-1933 gold coins in their planning. Both the contemporary bullion coins and historic gold coins carry modest premiums over their gold melt value, track the gold price, and enjoy strong liquidity internationally.

The primary benefits to gold bullion bars for gold buyers are diversity and affordability. Gold bullion bars have lower premiums over the spot price of gold when compared to gold bullion coins, and the variety of options is far more diverse. Gold bullion bars are available not only in the aforementioned weights, but also styles including cast, hand-poured, and minted ingots. Gold bullion bars are struck continuously to meet the demand for gold, with the following refineries and mints representing some of the greatest refiners of gold bars:

A silver round is exactly what it sounds like. It is a round piece of pure silver. This form is similar to a coin, but unlike a coin it does not carry any face value. Because silver rounds cannot be used as legal tender, these bullion products may be produced by government and private mints, as well. Silver rounds come in various sizes, but like silver bullion coins the most common size is 1oz. Silver rounds carry the smallest premium over the spot silver price, making them a very good choice for investors looking to accumulate silver.
Given the fact that gold no longer backs the U.S. dollar (or other worldwide currencies for that matter), why is it still important today? The simple answer is that while gold is no longer in the forefront of everyday transactions, it is still important to the global economy. To validate this point, there is no need to look further than the balance sheets of central banks and other financial organizations, such as the International Monetary Fund. Presently, these organizations are responsible for holding approximately one-fifth of the world's supply of above-ground gold. In addition, several central banks have added to their present gold reserves, reflecting concerns about the long-term global economy.
Chinese Silver Panda: Issued regularly as a silver bullion coin since 1989, the Chinese Silver Panda was the first silver bullion coin to use a new design for the obverse image of the Giant Panda. On the reverse, you'll find the Temple of Heaven's Hall of Prayer for Abundant Harvests, a design in use since 1983 when the Silver Panda debuted as a proof silver coin. Today, the Chinese Silver Panda is available as 30 Gram coins with .999 pure silver content.

After that, investors are often attracted to gold miners like industry giants Barrick Gold (NYSE:ABX), Goldcorp, and Newmont Mining. The shares of gold miners usually track the price of the metal and they can invest in their assets to increase production over time. The shares of miners, however, come with additional risks. For example, many miners are focused on gold, but that's not the only metal they produce. Barrick gets around 90% of its revenue from gold; the rest comes from copper and other sources -- it's not exactly a pure play. 
So it should be pretty clear at this point that gold in and of itself can be a risky investment. But if you use gold appropriately, it can provide an offset to other assets that aren't performing well. And the interplay between gold and those other assets is what helps to create diversified portfolios. No, don't invest 100% of your saving into gold in any form. Yes, consider adding a small allotment of gold to your portfolio. But how should you invest in the metal?
Once you've built your gold position, you should strongly consider keeping it a core portion of your portfolio. That, of course, comes with a caveat: If you target a 10% allocation to gold, then once a year or so you'll want to revisit that allocation to make sure it's still roughly where you want it. If gold is having a good year and your position has increased to 12% or more of your portfolio, it's wise to sell some of the position to bring it back to 10%, and put the resulting cash into other investments. Conversely, if your gold position falls to 8% or so, then you may want to add to it to bring it back to your 10% target. This is really just simple portfolio rebalancing, but it's an important maintenance issue that you shouldn't forget about.   

Even those investors focused primarily on growth rather than steady income can benefit from choosing gold stocks that demonstrate historically strong dividend performance. Stocks that pay dividends tend to show higher gains when the sector is rising and fare better – on average, nearly twice as well – than non-dividend-paying stocks when the overall sector is in a downturn.


After that, investors are often attracted to gold miners like industry giants Barrick Gold (NYSE:ABX), Goldcorp, and Newmont Mining. The shares of gold miners usually track the price of the metal and they can invest in their assets to increase production over time. The shares of miners, however, come with additional risks. For example, many miners are focused on gold, but that's not the only metal they produce. Barrick gets around 90% of its revenue from gold; the rest comes from copper and other sources -- it's not exactly a pure play. 
For many centuries, gold coins were the primary form of money. They started to fall into disuse by the early 20th century. In 1933, most countries switched from the gold standard to define the value of a dollar. This was because of the hoarding that occurred during the Great Depression. As a result, most countries stopped making gold coins to use as currency. The United States did not make a complete change until 1971 when it finally ended the draconian ban on investment ownership. For numismatic purposes, gold coins must not include alloys such as manganese brass. Some legal tender coins are not circulated, which means they are primarily for investment and collectors.
Finding good sellers and buying gold coins means taking the time to find good sources. Government mints are always safe but supply is very limited. Licensed, established dealers like Scottsdale Bullion and Coin are other viable choices. There are private sellers and online auction sales, but these are high risk, so these options requires great caution. Two good sources for learning about where to buy gold include tips from the Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. Mint.

However much also depends on the way in which you invest in gold. There are many forms of gold investment, offering the opportunity to pin your wealth on the fluctuations of the gold price. Issuers of assets such as gold ETFs, unallocated gold bullion and gold futures will use gold's reputation as a secure and dependable commodity as a reason to invest in their product. However, despite being backed by gold, these contracts do not entitle the investor to any amount of physical gold. The validity and worth of such investments are ultimately dependent on the performance of the organisations issuing the contracts and, in the same way as any other paper or electronic asset, are vulnerable to entirely losing their value. For access to the long-term financial security offered by precious metals, then, the safest way is to invest in allocated, physical bullion bars and coins.
Once you have decided on the quantity of gold bullion to purchase, your Monex Account Representative will assist you in executing your order over the phone. Your purchase and price will be confirmed on a voice recorded line after your acknowledgment, and a written confirmation will be sent to you with the details of your order. Payment may be made after you order, but must be initiated on the day of purchase, which means you must mail or wire funds on the day of your purchase. You can have your metal (a) shipped to your home; (b) made available for pick-up at over 30 facilities across the U.S. and Canada; or (c) have your metal delivered to a bank/depository for storage.
Australian Coins: Struck by the Perth Mint, the Australian Kangaroo gold coin is available in 1/10 ounce, ¼ ounce, ½ ounce, and 1-ounce weights. The coin design changes each year, and the 2017 version features a kangaroo leaping across the outback. One of the benefits of the Australian Kangaroo gold coin is that it is acceptable to purchase in an IRA.
Buying from a local dealer and buying online may be two very different things. Brick and mortar coin dealers will often have significantly higher dealer premiums associated with their products. Online dealers, such as Silver.com, often have much lower overhead and move more inventory thus allowing us to offer bullion products for lower prices. To see what others are saying about buying precious metals online from us, you can read some customer reviews of Silver.com.

The Hard Assets Alliance was created in 2012 by a group of trusted independent financial researchers who believe that every investor should hold physical precious metals for both capital preservation and capital gains. With more than 35 years in the investment world, the Alliance founders are uniquely positioned to facilitate the needs of the average investor.
Gold maintains a special position in the market with many tax regimes. For example, in the European Union the trading of recognised gold coins and bullion products are free of VAT. Silver and other precious metals or commodities do not have the same allowance. Other taxes such as capital gains tax may also apply for individuals depending on their tax residency. U.S. citizens may be taxed on their gold profits at collectibles or capital gains rates, depending on the investment vehicle used.[61]
False Claims – Unscrupulous sellers often overprice their coins, lie about the bullion content, or try to pass off ordinary bullion coins as rare collectible coins. Some fraudulent dealers may even try to sell coins that aren't bullion coins at all. Others may try to sell bullion pieces with the same design as coins from the U.S. Mint, but in different sizes. Indeed, private mints issue coins that look like bullion coins minted by foreign governments, but may have little or no gold content. Your best defense is to study the market and choose your dealer carefully.
Compare dealer prices. Aside from the proof version, the U.S. Mint doesn’t sell American Eagle gold coins directly. But there is a dealer location tool on the Mint’s website. Comparing prices among dealers is easy, too, because coins sell at a premium above gold’s spot price, or its delivery price as a commodity. You can find the spot price on precious metals exchange sites such as Monex.com or Kitco.com.

Over the years, Gold price history has shown that the global economic climate primarily determines the value. When the largest economies in the world, including the United States, are experiencing growth, demand for Gold goes down as investors are more willing to try riskier options such as the stock market. When leading countries suffer a recession, the demand for Gold goes back up due to its historic role as a safe haven investment. As seen many times in the history of Gold, prices will once again go up. This relationship between historical rates and the current value of Gold has been viewed many times over the years and is a central determining factor used by market analysts.
Not all gold products are IRA eligible for inclusion in precious metal retirement accounts. Please look for the ✔IRA APPROVED checkmark on the product page for the product that you are interested in purchasing. If the checkmark is not present on the page, that product is not eligible for inclusion in precious metal retirement accounts. If you have any questions regarding setting up or buying gold for your account please contact our staff at 1-800-294-8732.
If you wish to invest in gold, it probably makes the most sense to pick a percentage of your portfolio that you want to allocate to gold and then dollar-cost average into the position by buying small amounts over time. There's no harm in leaving the money that you plan to invest in cash while you are building the position, either, since cash is a safe-haven investment, too. Yes, you'll miss the opportunity from rising gold prices, but you'll still get the protection of holding cash. And it will stop you from investing the money in other assets while you wait to build out your gold position. 

This article started off looking to answer a very simple question: Is gold a safe investment? Like so many things in life, however, simple questions can have very complex answers. In the case of gold, it is a risky asset class, and it would be unwise to invest only in gold. However, because gold is viewed as a store of wealth, you shouldn't dismiss it as an investment option. Investors tend to flock to gold when they are scared, which boosts its value when assets such as stocks are falling. It just needs to be paired with a more broadly diversified portfolio so you can benefit from the non-correlated nature of gold's performance. And, yes, that will require rebalancing your portfolio every so often, maybe once a year or when allocations get materially out of line.
American Gold Eagles: Based on one of America’s most classic designs, the American Gold Eagle 1-ounce coin was first minted in 1986 and is considered the most popular and most recognizable gold coin in the world. This 22-karat (91.6% pure gold) coin is modeled after the Gold Double Eagle design first minted in 1907. American Gold Eagle coins are available in 1-ounce, ½ ounce, ¼ ounce, and 1/10 ounce versions. The newest iteration of these coins usually carry a slightly higher premium than older, common dated American Gold Eagle coins.
Countries around the world face unprecedented levels of sovereign debt, and this balance will come due. However, governments like the United States are obsessed with just one solution to their debt problems: currency debasement, also known as inflation. The US is on autopilot towards the permanent destruction of the dollar with its inflationary monetary policies. Buying gold is one of the best and easiest ways to protect yourself from that destruction and grow your wealth at the same time. Click here to learn the ABC’s of buying gold.
Bullion coins can be defined as high-grade precious metals coins suitable for investment purposes. Bullion coins are predominantly issued by a government agency, however, there are some cases where coins are produced by private institutions. That said, in almost all cases, the coin is almost completely made of a precious metal (90% purity and above), it has the amount of that metal stamped on the coin based on a standard metric, and it is also stamped by the agency that created the coin. So, for example, a Gold Eagle is crafted by the U.S. mint, authorized by the U.S. government, and has both the weight (1 troy ounce) and the purity, in some cases, included on its surface (see the Gold Buffalo issued by the U.S. mint).
In 2007 the Royal Canadian Mint produced a 100 kilograms (220 lb) gold coin with a face value of $1,000,000, though the gold content was worth over $2 million at the time. It measures 50 centimetres (20 in) in diameter and is 3 centimetres (1.2 in) thick. It was intended as a one-off to promote a new line of Canadian Gold Maple Leaf coins, but after several interested buyers came forward the mint announced it would manufacture them as ordered and sell them for between $2.5 million and $3 million. As of May 3, 2007, there were five orders.[3] One of these coins has been stolen when it was on exhibition at the Bode Museum in Berlin.[4]
Since 1919 the most common benchmark for the price of gold has been the London gold fixing, a twice-daily telephone meeting of representatives from five bullion-trading firms of the London bullion market. Furthermore, gold is traded continuously throughout the world based on the intra-day spot price, derived from over-the-counter gold-trading markets around the world (code "XAU"). The following table sets out the gold price versus various assets and key statistics at five-year intervals.[5]
Gold certificates are usually for unallocated gold, which means there's no specific gold associated with the certificate even though the company says it has enough gold to back all outstanding certificates. You can buy allocated gold certificates, where the certificates represent specific gold bullion, but the costs are higher. The big problem here is that the certificates are really only as good as the company backing them, sort of like banks before FDIC insurance was created. This is why one of the most desirable options for gold certificates is the Perth Mint, which is backed by the government of Western Australia. That said, if you are going to simply buy a paper representation of gold, you might want to consider exchange-traded funds instead. 
Advance fee fraud – Various emails circulate on the Internet for buyers or sellers of up to 10,000 metric tonnes of gold (an amount greater than US Federal Reserve holdings). Through the use of fake legalistic phrases, such as "Swiss Procedure" or "FCO" (Full Corporate Offer), naive middlemen are drafted as hopeful brokers. The end-game of these scams varies, with some attempting to extract a small "validation" amount from the innocent buyer/seller (in hopes of hitting the big deal),[68] and others focused on draining the bank accounts of their targeted dupes.[69]
Shop for gold bars, gold coins and gold bullion from top refiners and world mints, including the United States Mint, Royal Canadian Mint, Perth Mint, PAMP Suisse, Credit Suisse and more. Buying gold bars and gold coins can help to hedge your financial portfolio against inflation and help to protect your assets from a Stock Market crash. Read more about gold coins, gold bullion and gold bars here
Precious metals investments have always been the target of counterfitters looking to make a quick buck. To battle this issue, many mints implement unique markers and counterfeit-proof measures, like Sunshine Minting’s Mint Mark SI™ feature and the micro-graving done by the Royal Canadian Mint. As the counterfeiting is punishable by law and usually carries a heavy prison sentence and fines, legal tender coins are considered a comparatively safer option as their legal tender status acts as a successful deterrent in most cases.

Investing in gold coins from exotic, unknown mints can be a risky choice. Grading, purity, and other factors determine the value of gold coins – but investors must take great care when sinking money into the illiquid and opaque collectible market. Coins that are supposedly worth way more than their actual melt value should be avoided by everyone but experienced collectors.
Local coin and bullion shops may carry various types of bullion bar and coin as well as numismatics and collectibles. Such shops may, however, carry smaller inventories and charge higher premiums compared to online dealers. This makes sense, after all, given the fact the brick and mortar coin shops tend to have higher operating costs compared to online dealers.
Miners begin by finding a place where they believe gold is located in large enough quantities that it can be economically obtained. Then local governments and agencies have to grant the company permission to build and operate a mine. Developing a mine is a dangerous, expensive, and time-consuming process with little to no economic return until the mine is finally operational -- which often takes a decade or more from start to finish. 
Investment Grade Coins are higher quality and more rare than bullion coins. These coins are also graded and are enclosed in a protective slab to ensure and preserve the condition of the coin. A study commissioned by the U.S. Congress has proven that certain Investment Grade Coins are shown to have an annual return of 15%. Investment Grade Coins are for investors planning to hold onto their investment for at least 3 years.
Another factor to take into account when purchasing silver instruments is whether to buy new, freshly-minted products or to look for relatively cheaper secondary-market silver goods. Like any other product or commodity, everyone automatically prefers shiny and new over "second hand." Moreover, there is a widespread myth among some investors that secondary-market precious metals products have a lower resale value because of their condition and lack of finish. Nonetheless, in reality, brand-new silver bars and rounds in perfect condition sell at the same rates (considering equal silver weight and purity) as their secondary market counterparts do. However, collectors who treasure silver coins for their collectible value will, in most cases, prefer mint condition and near-perfect condition coins.
Answer. We probably get that question more than any other -- pretty much on a daily basis. The answer, however, is not as straightforward as you might think. What you buy depends upon your goals. We usually answer the "What should I buy?" question with one of our own: "Why are you interested in buying gold?" If your goal is simply to hedge financial uncertainty and/or capitalize on price movement, then contemporary bullion coins will serve your purposes. Those concerned with the possibility of capital controls and a gold seizure, or call-in, often include historic pre-1933 gold coins in their planning. Both the contemporary bullion coins and historic gold coins carry modest premiums over their gold melt value, track the gold price, and enjoy strong liquidity internationally.
Arguably, gold has the freest market value mechanism of all assets in the world. As such, economic factors determine the price of gold, mainly the decline of the U.S. dollar, or other fiat currencies which it is measured by. Decreases in the value of ones currency leads to higher prices of gold and greater appreciation for its value as true, honest money. Also, uncertainty in the financial markets such as interest rates, stock prices and political uncertainties generally lead to greater demand for gold and a greater appreciate in the price of gold.

With that said, it's worth noting that many silver bullion coin programs also have proof collectible options. These coins offer the same design as their bullion counterpart but deliver collectible value courtesy of a more visually brilliant design finish and lower, set mintage figures. The Proof American Silver Eagle Coin and the Proof Australian Silver Kangaroo are just two examples of silver bullion coin available in a collectible version as well.
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