And then there are operational issues, since mining is expensive, time-consuming, and often dangerous. A problem at a mine, a major exploration success, or any number of other operational issues can cause a miner's stock performance to diverge materially from the price of gold. Small miners, meanwhile, often provide the most upside opportunity and downside risk, since tiny moves in the price of gold can sometimes be the difference between these miners making a profit or losing money. And then there are companies like Northern Dynasty Minerals, where the only asset is a mine under development. The stock is cheap today, making it something of an option on the price of gold since the value of the mine (called the Pebble Project) won't be realized for years. But if the Pebble Project gets built, Northern Dynasty could see material stock-price gains.
Of all the precious metals, gold is the most popular as an investment.[1] Investors generally buy gold as a way of diversifying risk, especially through the use of futures contracts and derivatives. The gold market is subject to speculation and volatility as are other markets. Compared to other precious metals used for investment, gold has the most effective safe haven and hedging properties across a number of countries.[2]
Mutual funds. Another option for investors who prefer the idea of owning mining stocks over direct gold exposure is to buy a portfolio of miners all at once via a pooled investment. This saves investors the legwork of researching the various mining options and is a simple way to create a diversified portfolio of mining stocks with a single investment. There are a lot of options here, with most major mutual fund houses offering open-end funds that invest in gold miners. Two examples are the Fidelity Select Gold Portfolio and Vanguard Precious Metals Fund. 
Why sell bullion coins? At some point they will appreciate enough to represent a very attractive source of income. This can boost savings in gold accounts like a precious metals IRA, or offset an investment loss elsewhere. The trick to selling is to get a fair to good price. Trying to win a major sale of the year likely won’t happen, but good sales happen regularly. Research and watching spot market pricing of precious metals is the first step, and selling to reliable buyers is the second. Scottsdale Bullion and Coin, for example, will purchase gold bullion coins at very fair prices, making it a good source to sell gold and silver coins. It is possible to sell privately, but always make sure to get paid first before releasing a coin. And don’t trust credit card payments unless you are protected from chargebacks. Many scammers buy a coin and then claim to their credit card company it was never delivered. The charge gets reversed, and the seller is then out both the coin and the payment.
However, people still love the yellow metal. Clearly, a big part of demand comes from the jewelry industry -- we all like nice baubles and trinkets. But a notable amount of demand comes from entities that want to own gold in its physical form via coins, bullion, and bars. That stems largely from the economic history of gold and the resulting view of the metal as a safe-haven investment. If paper money were to suddenly become worthless, the world would have to fall back on something of value to facilitate trade. One of the most logical options is gold, since that was the role it played before fiat currencies ruled the day. This is one of the reasons that investors tend to push up the price of gold when financial markets are volatile.
So if you’re socking away funds for retirement, why save in dollars? The US dollar is consistently losing purchasing power. Plus, in today’s banking environment it can actually cost money to keep your savings in a bank account. Gold is one of the best ways to ensure the 100 dollars you have today will hold its purchasing power decades into the future.
Warren Buffett, the CEO of Berkshire Hathaway (tickere: BRK.A, BRK.B) and perhaps the greatest investor of all time, understands that fear. Gold investors, he says, are "right to be afraid of paper money. Their basic premise that paper money around the world is going to be worth less and less over time is absolutely correct. They have the correct basic premise. They should run from paper money."

Answer. Futures and options contracts are generally considered one of the most speculative arenas in the investment marketplace. The investor's exposure to the market is leveraged and the moves both up and down are greatly exaggerated. Something like 9 out of 10 investors who enter the futures/options market come away losers. For someone looking to hedge his or her portfolio against economic and financial risk, this is a poor substitute for owning the metal itself.

As mentioned above, the market for Precious Metals generally moves independent from stocks and bonds. If you buy physical Gold, you can balance your portfolio so you need not fear the NYSE. In an economic slowdown, your Precious Metals may provide a comforting, stable point among your investments. You can easily look up historical Gold prices to see this balance for yourself.

The timing on your gold purchase is a bit more complicated, since you will pay more for gold and gold-related stocks when gold prices are high. That doesn't diminish the diversification benefit over the long term, but high gold prices can mean lackluster returns over the near term. Trying to time your entry point, however, leads to market timing judgment calls that are best avoided by most, if not all, investors.
Coins are another very popular way to invest in silver bullion. Silver coins, like bars, can offer investors a simple and convenient way to invest in the precious metal. There are many different types of silver coins available today produced by various governments throughout the world. Some of the most common bullion coins are the American Silver Eagle, Canadian Silver Maple Leaf, Chinese Silver Panda and British Silver Britannia. Silver bullion coins come in various sizes with the 1oz variation being the most popular. In addition, one can buy tubes or monster boxes of multiple coins for convenience at at reasonable cost over spot price.
Mining-focused ETFs. That's why you might prefer to own an index-based product, like a mining-focused ETF. Some options here include VanEck Vectors Gold Miners ETF and VanEck Vectors Junior Gold Miners ETF. Both invest in gold miners (with the same caveats about exposure to other metals), but as you can tell from their names, they do slightly different things: The latter focuses on smaller gold miners. The expense ratios here are 0.53% and 0.54%, respectively. If you're looking for a single investment that provides broadly diversified exposure to gold miners, then low-cost index-based ETFs like these are a good option.  
American Eagles and similar gold coins are collectible because of the precious metals used in the construction. Precious metal content, also called PMC, is a term that tells you the amount found in each coin. These designs can contain a precious metals content of up to one ounce per coin. This amount can include 0.1, 0.25, or 0.5 ounces too. Collectors often prefer designs with more precious metals. These bullion coins have a weight based on troy ounce, which is a measurement that's a little over 31 grams. Even an American Gold Eagle made primarily from gold often contains trace amounts of other metals like silver.
There are both advantages and disadvantages to every investment. If you are opposed to holding physical gold, buying shares in a gold mining company may be a safer alternative. If you believe gold could be a safe bet against inflation, investing in coins, bullion, or jewelry are paths that you can take to gold-based prosperity. Lastly, if your primary interest is in using leverage to profit from rising gold prices, the futures market might be your answer, but note that there is a fair amount of risk associated with any leverage-based holdings.
Bullion coins are often given a face value, but it is usually lower than the true value of the precious metals making up the coin. Bullion coins are often given a melt value, which is the theoretical value if you melted the coin down and sold it at the current spot price for the precious metal it is made of. So if the spot value of silver is $16 a troy ounce, then the melt value of a single half troy ounce silver bullion coin is $8.
The value of numismatic coins is determined by features such as condition, age, rarity and the number of coins originally minted. An example of a coveted collector's coin is the Spur Royal. The grade of the coin also matters, which is a numerical score assigned based on a visual evaluation of the amount of wear. Basic grades are good, fine, and un-circulated. The Universal rarity scale and the Sheldon rarity scale are the scales used to determine how rare a coin might be.
South Africa introduced the Krugerrand in 1967 to cater to this market; this was the reason for its convenient and memorable gold content – exactly one troy ounce. It was the first modern, low-premium (i.e. priced only slightly above the bullion value of the gold) gold bullion coin. Bullion coins are also produced in fractions of an ounce – typically half ounce, quarter ounce, and one-tenth ounce. Bullion coins sometimes carry a face value as legal tender. The face value is minted on the coin, and it is done so in order to bestow legal tender status on a coin, which generally makes it easier to import or export across national borders, as well as subject to laws against counterfeiting. However, their real value is measured as dictated by their troy weight, the current market price of the precious metal contained, and the prevailing premium that market wishes to pay for those particular bullion coins. The face value is always significantly less than the bullion value of the coin. Legal tender bullion coins are a separate entity to bullion gold. One enjoys legal tender status, the latter is merely a raw commodity. Gold has an international currency code of XAU under ISO 4217. ISO 4217 includes codes not only for currencies, but also for precious metals (gold, silver, palladium and platinum; by definition expressed per one troy ounce.
In the early 1970s, one ounce of gold equaled $35. Let's say that at that time, you had a choice of either holding an ounce of gold or simply keeping the $35. They would both buy you the same things, like a brand new business suit or fancy bicycle. However, if you had an ounce of gold today and converted it for today's prices, it would still be enough to buy a brand new suit, but the same cannot be said for the $35. In short, you would have lost a substantial amount of your wealth if you decided to hold the $35 as opposed to the one ounce of gold because the value of gold has increased, while the value of a dollar has been eroded by inflation.
They also sell gold bars and metalor gold bars in one ounce and ten ounce weights. US Bullion also deals in a range of silver products. Such include the American Silver Eagle, silver bars in a variety of weights and bags of silver coins from 1965 to 1969 and before. By opening an account with US Bullion on their website ordering their quality products is quick and easy.
White says that American Eagle Bullion coins, one of the most popular coins for investing in gold, first make their way into the market when they are sold to the Mint’s “authorized purchasers.” (See the list below of the authorized purchasers and their prices, terms and conditions. If you’re new to buying gold, they are a great place to start.) Gold coins are also sold in commemorative editions directly to the public, but these are more expensive. The Mint marks up the price of the coins to cover the value of the gold and the actual minting, as well as shipping and other costs, White says. Dealers say that markup is about 3%. Then the authorized purchasers -- some of whom sell directly to the public and all of whom sell to other dealers -- add their own markup, as do the dealers who buy the coins.
Countries around the world face unprecedented levels of sovereign debt, and this balance will come due. However, governments like the United States are obsessed with just one solution to their debt problems: currency debasement, also known as inflation. The US is on autopilot towards the permanent destruction of the dollar with its inflationary monetary policies. Buying gold is one of the best and easiest ways to protect yourself from that destruction and grow your wealth at the same time. Click here to learn the ABC’s of buying gold.
The World Gold Council supports the development of gold markets and helps investors understand how investments in gold can help them achieve their investment objectives. We work to expand the options for individual and institutional investors to access the gold market by working with the financial industry to develop and promote new offerings through direct and intermediated channels.
Another factor to take into account when purchasing silver instruments is whether to buy new, freshly-minted products or to look for relatively cheaper secondary-market silver goods. Like any other product or commodity, everyone automatically prefers shiny and new over "second hand." Moreover, there is a widespread myth among some investors that secondary-market precious metals products have a lower resale value because of their condition and lack of finish. Nonetheless, in reality, brand-new silver bars and rounds in perfect condition sell at the same rates (considering equal silver weight and purity) as their secondary market counterparts do. However, collectors who treasure silver coins for their collectible value will, in most cases, prefer mint condition and near-perfect condition coins.
In the early 1970s, one ounce of gold equaled $35. Let's say that at that time, you had a choice of either holding an ounce of gold or simply keeping the $35. They would both buy you the same things, like a brand new business suit or fancy bicycle. However, if you had an ounce of gold today and converted it for today's prices, it would still be enough to buy a brand new suit, but the same cannot be said for the $35. In short, you would have lost a substantial amount of your wealth if you decided to hold the $35 as opposed to the one ounce of gold because the value of gold has increased, while the value of a dollar has been eroded by inflation.
Bullion coins are minted from precious metal, usually gold or silver, and bought for investment purposes from major banks, coin dealers, brokerage firms, and precious metal dealers. Their value is based on their gold or silver bullion content. Prices fluctuate daily, depending on the price of gold and silver in the world markets. Perhaps the best-known bullion coins are the American Gold Eagle, the Canadian Maple Leaf, the Australian Gold Nugget, and the South African Krugerrand.
If you want a low-cost way to invest in the short-term direction of gold’s price or to employ leverage with options—and you never want or need to take delivery of your metal—bullion ETFs can be ideal. But if the main reason you’re investing in gold is for protection of your financial assets during an economic downturn or “Black Swan” type event, it hardly makes sense to place your trust in the banking system.

If you’re looking to buy gold as an investment option, then gold bullion coins offer a great place to start. Gold coins offer beautiful designs known the world over and many come with gold purity and weight backed by central governments and issued by sovereign mints. You’ll find no shortage of gold bullion coins available to purchase when you shop online. In fact, the most difficult task you’ll face may just be choosing which coins you want in your portfolio! Below is an overview of the some of the most popular gold bullion coins available today.
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