Jack Hunt (NY): 800-877-7424. Minimum purchase of five ounces. Payment must be sent upfront, then the company ships. Coins offered: one-ounce Gold Eagle coins minted in 2011 or past years. The company recently charged 4% over the spot price. With the purchase of 100 coins or more, you get a discount. For example, the markup would be reduced to 3.9% for 100 coins. With an order of 20 or more coins, there’s no shipping fee; for fewer than 20, there’s a $25 flat fee.
In 2007 the Royal Canadian Mint produced a 100 kilograms (220 lb) gold coin with a face value of $1,000,000, though the gold content was worth over $2 million at the time. It measures 50 centimetres (20 in) in diameter and is 3 centimetres (1.2 in) thick. It was intended as a one-off to promote a new line of Canadian Gold Maple Leaf coins, but after several interested buyers came forward the mint announced it would manufacture them as ordered and sell them for between $2.5 million and $3 million. As of May 3, 2007, there were five orders.[3] One of these coins has been stolen when it was on exhibition at the Bode Museum in Berlin.[4]
Given that $52 billion worth of gold was sold last year for investment purposes, according to the World Gold Council, it’s not surprising that shady dealers have lined up for a piece of the action. Most of the total was invested in gold mutual funds or exchange-traded funds. But some of us like to possess the lustrous stuff by buying it in coins or bars -- and that’s when you can get ripped off. Regulators say the number of rip-offs is rising with the price of the precious metal.
Once again, it is important to figure out the current market value of gold before you sell your gold coins. Only work with a reputable dealer like Money Metals Exchange which has an impeccable reputation. Be wary of online auction sites, such as eBay and Amazon, that can become gathering places for scammers. Look for attentive customer service and an SSL secured website with product pages that offer live buy and sell prices. An online dealer often offers a higher price for gold than a local coin shop and you can instantly lock in the price. Read online reviews, read each title and summary, and stay away from sites with one star to ensure you are working with a valid precious metals dealer.
United States Gold Bureau is a private distributor of Gold, Silver & Platinum coins from the U.S. Mint and is not affiliated with the U.S. Government. Information on this web site is intended for educational purpose only and is not to be used as investment advice or a recommendation to buy sell or trade any asset that requires a licensed broker. As with all investments there is risk and the past performance of a particular asset class does not guarantee any future performance. The United States Gold Bureau, principals and representatives do not guarantee to clients that they will realize a profit or guarantee that losses may not be incurred as a result of following its coin collecting recommendations, or upon liquidation of coins bought from the U.S. Gold Bureau. All content and images are owned by USGB and may not be reproduced without written authorization.

Gold coins are an investment that preserve wealth, a hedge against inflation, and a safe haven during times of global uncertainty. Buying gold coins is a great way to purchase physical precious metals as opposed to non-physical gold ownership, such as gold exchange-traded funds (ETFs), gold exchange-traded notes (ETNs), futures contracts, and mining stocks. Precious metals, such as silver, gold, and platinum can also be purchased as bars and rounds. Gold coins can be stored in safety deposit boxes or in a secure place in your home. As a value investor, you should try to purchase gold coins as close the spot price as you can. Smaller gold coins, such as 1/10 oz, will have a higher premium -- but they may be easier to carry and use in a crisis, particularly given their smaller increment of value.

To buy gold bullion or silver bullion for numismatic value, one needs to have a very good understanding of the collectable market. Often times, values will vary significantly from year to year. Remember, unlike a bullion price, a collectible coin is only worth what it can be sold for. Many buyers have been burned spending lots of money for a “collectable” and then selling it for far less.


Investing in gold coins from exotic, unknown mints can be a risky choice. Grading, purity, and other factors determine the value of gold coins – but investors must take great care when sinking money into the illiquid and opaque collectible market. Coins that are supposedly worth way more than their actual melt value should be avoided by everyone but experienced collectors.
Once you've built your gold position, you should strongly consider keeping it a core portion of your portfolio. That, of course, comes with a caveat: If you target a 10% allocation to gold, then once a year or so you'll want to revisit that allocation to make sure it's still roughly where you want it. If gold is having a good year and your position has increased to 12% or more of your portfolio, it's wise to sell some of the position to bring it back to 10%, and put the resulting cash into other investments. Conversely, if your gold position falls to 8% or so, then you may want to add to it to bring it back to your 10% target. This is really just simple portfolio rebalancing, but it's an important maintenance issue that you shouldn't forget about.   
In 2008, despite the financial crisis, some investors continued to hedge against a dollar decline caused by two new factors. One was the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing program, launched in December 2008. In that program, the Fed exchanged credit for bank Treasurys. The Fed simply created the credit out of thin air. Investors were concerned this increase in the money supply would create inflation.
Over the years, Gold price history has shown that the global economic climate primarily determines the value. When the largest economies in the world, including the United States, are experiencing growth, demand for Gold goes down as investors are more willing to try riskier options such as the stock market. When leading countries suffer a recession, the demand for Gold goes back up due to its historic role as a safe haven investment. As seen many times in the history of Gold, prices will once again go up. This relationship between historical rates and the current value of Gold has been viewed many times over the years and is a central determining factor used by market analysts.

Answer. Futures and options contracts are generally considered one of the most speculative arenas in the investment marketplace. The investor's exposure to the market is leveraged and the moves both up and down are greatly exaggerated. Something like 9 out of 10 investors who enter the futures/options market come away losers. For someone looking to hedge his or her portfolio against economic and financial risk, this is a poor substitute for owning the metal itself.
Although central banks do not generally announce gold purchases in advance, some, such as Russia, have expressed interest in growing their gold reserves again as of late 2005.[22] In early 2006, China, which only holds 1.3% of its reserves in gold,[23] announced that it was looking for ways to improve the returns on its official reserves. Some bulls hope that this signals that China might reposition more of its holdings into gold, in line with other central banks. Chinese investors began pursuing investment in gold as an alternative to investment in the Euro after the beginning of the Eurozone crisis in 2011. China has since become the world’s top gold consumer as of 2013.[24]
Answer. We probably get that question more than any other -- pretty much on a daily basis. The answer, however, is not as straightforward as you might think. What you buy depends upon your goals. We usually answer the "What should I buy?" question with one of our own: "Why are you interested in buying gold?" If your goal is simply to hedge financial uncertainty and/or capitalize on price movement, then contemporary bullion coins will serve your purposes. Those concerned with the possibility of capital controls and a gold seizure, or call-in, often include historic pre-1933 gold coins in the mix. Both categories carry modest premiums over their gold melt value, track the gold price, and enjoy strong liquidity internationally.
The Hard Assets Alliance was created in 2012 by a group of trusted independent financial researchers who believe that every investor should hold physical precious metals for both capital preservation and capital gains. With more than 35 years in the investment world, the Alliance founders are uniquely positioned to facilitate the needs of the average investor.

Some people out there appreciate the true beauty of a beautifully minted silver coin. Take the coins from the famous American Silver Eagle program for example, with obverses featuring Weinman’s beautiful Walking Liberty and the reverses depicting Mercanti’s rendition of a Bald Eagle and a shield, a symbol of American strength and pride. Collectors buy these products for their ‘artistic’ or ‘collectible’ value rather than their melt value. For them, there is no right or wrong; they should pick the products that they consider aesthetically appealing.


Exchange-traded funds, or ETFs, are investment companies that are legally classified as open-end companies or unit investment trusts (UITs), but that differ from traditional open-end companies and UITs.[51] The main differences are that ETFs do not sell directly to investors and they issue their shares in what are called "Creation Units" (large blocks such as blocks of 50,000 shares). Also, the Creation Units may not be purchased with cash but a basket of securities that mirrors the ETF's portfolio. Usually, the Creation Units are split up and re-sold on a secondary market.
Investors should be wary of dealers who encourage them to purchase pre 1933 us gold coins that are priced well above their actual melt value.  Many of these coins are not the least bit rare, even if they have a spiffy plastic case with a grade and a hologram on it. Unless you have money to blow, do not pay more than a few percent over the melt value of a coin unless you are highly knowledgeable about rare coins.  Collecting coins can be a fun hobby, but the field is filled with rip-off artists and inflated prices.
How exactly does gold get from the ground to the point where you can hold it in your hand? Although panning for gold -- swirling muddy water from streams around in a pan in the hopes of finding gold flakes -- was a common practice during the California Gold Rush, nowadays the precious metal is generally mined from the ground. While gold can be found by itself, it's far more common to find it with other metals, including silver and copper. Thus, a miner may actually produce gold as a by-product of its other mining efforts, or be focused exclusively on gold but produce copper and silver as by-products.
Many coin and small bar dealers offer 'free' shipping when you buy online, but in reality that cost has been shifted into the price you pay for the coin or bar, along with the cost of its manufacture and the dealer's profit margin. In total, it is not unusual for all of these costs to result in you paying 5-8% over the actual wholesale price of the gold you buy.

The Perth Mint and quality production are nearly synonymous. That is evident with their Lunar coins series and Kangaroo Gold coins. Both are popular with investors not only for their quality strike, but also for their fine Gold content. Kangaroos and Lunar coins have coin value to them, diversifying any investment portfolio. Multiple sizes are available for these coins, providing quality options for investors.

Thus, some rounds, coins, and gold bars of similar weights can have substantially lower prices compared to their more popular counterparts. However, gold coins usually enjoy a higher premium than other gold investment options due to official recognition from a sovereign government. Even though the face value given to the coin is nominal in nature, it inspires confidence among buyers.


Our customer service has been and will always be a priority. Should you have a question about prospective orders, orders in process, or completed orders, simply contact our phone support, live chat support, or email support for a prompt response. We are always willing and able to assist you with an existing order or to answer any questions that you may have.

As with any commodity worthy of investment, there has been a lot of change to Gold prices in the last 5 years. Periods of strength in the U.S. economy have led to lower prices from time to time. Comparatively, periods of volatility in the stock market and other sectors have given power to the price of Gold. When investing in Gold, it is essential to watch the market trends closely, going at least 5 years back to research. This will give a broader picture of what to expect, and give you the chance to determine whether you are buying on an upward climb or a downward slide. All investors must keep in mind that Gold prices will change many times over the course of a 5 year period, but doing the research enables wise investing. Even during weeks or months when Gold prices have experienced a rise, watching the trend will help you decide whether to hold onto your Precious Metals or sell them.
The most obvious answer is to run out and buy some gold coins, bars, or jewelry. This isn't the best option for investors. For example, there's a huge markup on jewelry, which makes it a very bad investment choice. But there's also likely to be a markup on coins and bars that gets put into the price quoted from dealers. After all, they have to make a living and be compensated for acting as the intermediary between buyers and sellers.
Gold prices fluctuate daily just like stocks and currencies, since it trades around the world and around the clock. There are many factors that can affect the price of gold coins, including political events, the stock market, and other economic and monetary issues. Gold prices tend to perform strongest when economic or monetary conditions deteriorate.
A. A solid, professional gold firm can go a long way in helping the investor shortcut the learning curve. A good gold firm can help you avoid some the problems and pitfalls encountered along the way, and provide some direction. It can help you in the beginning and through the course of your gold ownership both in making additions to your portfolio and liquidations. A solid companion piece to the interview you are now reading is How to Choose a Gold Firm offered on this website. It offers clear guidelines for newcomers and is well-worth the five or ten minutes it takes to read it.

Silver is not only used in modern industry, but is also bought and accumulated for investment purposes. In fact, it has been used for this purpose for over 5000 years now. Silver and other precious metals, such as gold and platinum, are considered a store of value. Silver has been used in currencies for a very long time, as well. It was first used as a form of currency all the way back in 700 B.C. From the ancient Greeks, to the ancient Romans, to the British, silver has been part of currency trading for ages.

The content on MoneyCrashers.com is for informational and educational purposes only and should not be construed as professional financial advice. Should you need such advice, consult a licensed financial or tax advisor. References to products, offers, and rates from third party sites often change. While we do our best to keep these updated, numbers stated on this site may differ from actual numbers. We may have financial relationships with some of the companies mentioned on this website. Among other things, we may receive free products, services, and/or monetary compensation in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products or services. We strive to write accurate and genuine reviews and articles, and all views and opinions expressed are solely those of the authors.

The Chinese Mint is the official sovereign mint of the People’s Republic of China and produces the nation’s official gold bullion coin. Introduced in 1982 with 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, and 1/10 oz coins in .999 pure gold with the image of a Giant Panda on the reverse. In 1983, the Chinese Mint increased the offering to feature a 1/20 oz coin as well. Designs for the Chinese Gold Panda include:
Coins in a mint sealed monster box. Date of the mint box is fulfilled on a availability in the warehouse. Each coin is. 999 pure silver, making this one of the finest silver coins ever minted. The obverse side of this large coin features a design based on the earlier “Walking Liberty” coin, while the reverse side features an image of a bald eagle holding a shield beneath 13 stars.
The Federal Trade Commission reports a rise in boiler rooms hawking gold coins or bars. (A boiler room is filled with salespeople who cold call prospects and use high-pressure sales tactics.) Dama Brown, staff attorney for consumer affairs in the FTC’s Atlanta office, says that these operators usually make inflated claims about the potential profit from gold, such as “tripling your money in 30 days.” Such claims are often coupled with warnings about the weak economy and how gold, as a hard asset, is less risky than stocks, she says.
The difference between mint bars and cast bars are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to variations in gold bars. The U.S. Gold Bureau carries a plethora of different sized bars, both cast and mint. One of the most important factors people take into account when buying gold is what size to purchase. As stated previously, gold can be found in almost any weight you can imagine. The single gram or 1 gram bar is about about as small as you can go when it comes to gold bars with investment potential. Sometimes referred to as the "small bills" of the gold world, these tiny bars are just about the size of a thumbtack. The 5, 10, and 20 gram bars are the next steps up in terms of gold bar weights.
For most of history, coins were valued based on the precious metal they contain. Whether a coin was actually made by the party as claimed was of secondary importance compared to whether it contains the correct amount of metal – that is, correct weight and fineness (purity). Genuine appearance was simply a convenient shortcut to avoid time-consuming tests in everyday transactions.

Karat weight (K or kt) is a traditional fraction-based system used to denote the fineness of gold, with one karat being equal to 1/24 part of pure gold in an alloy. With the precision of modern assaying techniques, however, the fineness of gold ingots and bullion is more likely to appear as a decimal measurement. In this system, pure gold would be denoted as 1.000 fine. However, since absolutely pure gold is very soft and therefore not suitable for coinage or ingots, it is generally accepted worldwide that anything above .999 fine qualifies as 24K. Below is a karat weight to fineness conversion chart.
Bullion coins can be bought directly from the government agency or institution that prints the coin, if supplies are available. Most are minted on a limited run, and some run out very quickly. That leaves the secondary market from which to buy gold coins—either coin dealers or private owners. People buy coins for various reasons but the big drivers are investment to profit on changes in precious metal values or for collection. Popular coins include the South African Krugerrand, the Canadian Maple, and the U.S. Gold Eagle coins.
In addition, selling little-known, unusual, or exotic coins may be difficult, or you may have to sell below the market value of the metal. Unless the dealer has an immediate need for the coin you purchased, he may be reluctant to repurchase it from you. In contrast, bullion coins are a fungible commodity for which there is always a ready, liquid, and transparent global market.
A. Gold's baseline, essential quality is its role as the only primary asset that is not someone else's liability. That separates gold from the majority of capital assets which in fact do rely on another's ability to pay, like bonds and bank savings, or the performance of the management, or some other delimiting factor, as is the case with stocks. The first chapter of the ABCs of Gold Investing ends with this: "No matter what happens in this country, with the dollar, with the stock and bond markets, the gold owner will find a friend in the yellow metal -- something to rely upon when the chips are down. In gold, investors will find a vehicle to protect their wealth. Gold is bedrock."
Warren Buffett, the CEO of Berkshire Hathaway (tickere: BRK.A, BRK.B) and perhaps the greatest investor of all time, understands that fear. Gold investors, he says, are "right to be afraid of paper money. Their basic premise that paper money around the world is going to be worth less and less over time is absolutely correct. They have the correct basic premise. They should run from paper money."
Gold has been used as a form of money for thousands of years. Because of gold's luster, rarity, and its uncommon density (no other precious metal outside the platinum group is as heavy); it became the medium for trading. Gold also inspired the concept of money: compact, confidential, and changeless. Throughout the thousands of years that have passed, gold has only become more favored over other means of currency.
In 2008, despite the financial crisis, some investors continued to hedge against a dollar decline caused by two new factors. One was the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing program, launched in December 2008. In that program, the Fed exchanged credit for bank Treasurys. The Fed simply created the credit out of thin air. Investors were concerned this increase in the money supply would create inflation.
"The rich old speculator Bernard M. Baruch forehandedly bought gold and gold shares after the 1929 Crash. Years later a suspicious Treasury Secretary asked him why. Because, Baruch replied, he was 'commencing to have doubts about the currency.' Many are beginning to doubt the strength of the dollar as they well might. Following Baruch's example, they should lay in some gold as a hedge."
Coins are another very popular way to invest in silver bullion. Silver coins, like bars, can offer investors a simple and convenient way to invest in the precious metal. There are many different types of silver coins available today produced by various governments throughout the world. Some of the most common bullion coins are the American Silver Eagle, Canadian Silver Maple Leaf, Chinese Silver Panda and British Silver Britannia. Silver bullion coins come in various sizes with the 1oz variation being the most popular. In addition, one can buy tubes or monster boxes of multiple coins for convenience at at reasonable cost over spot price.

Reverse designs in the Queen’s Beast Series include 10 different heraldic beasts in all. Launched in 2016 with the Lion of England, other designs include the Red Dragon of Wales, Black Bull of Clarence, and the Unicorn of Scotland. The obverse of each coin features Queen Elizabeth II’s effigy, with all reverse and obverse designs from Jody Clark of the Royal Mint.

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