The most basic definition of a mint is an industrial facility that manufactures rounds, bars, or coins. Gold bullion mints produce coins that are used for both currency and investment purposes. It is believed the first mint was established in the 7th century BC in Lydia. The mint coined gold and silver. Leading bullion mints worldwide include the United States Mint, the Royal Canadian Mint, and the Perth Mint in Australia.
Find a source that sells gold bullion. Often dealers, brokerage houses and banks will sell both coins and bars. When assessing a dealer, see how long they've been in business, whether they're certified with an industry or government body and in what investment activities they specialize. In the United States the national mint provides a list of authorized sellers that you can check. [2]

Physical Gold adds security to your investment portfolio. As there is a finite amount of Gold in the world, Gold’s relative purchasing power tends to remain stable during periods of inflation. For example, in 1985, the cost of an ounce of Gold was about the cost of a nice men’s suit. Allowing for some peaks and valleys in the market, today, one ounce of Gold still costs about the same as a nice men’s suit, even though the price in dollars has nearly quadrupled. Gold prices do fluctuate, but they generally move independent of the stock market. For a stable investment independent of stocks and bonds that can protect your purchasing power long term, buy physical Gold.

Why sell bullion coins? At some point they will appreciate enough to represent a very attractive source of income. This can boost savings in gold accounts like a precious metals IRA, or offset an investment loss elsewhere. The trick to selling is to get a fair to good price. Trying to win a major sale of the year likely won’t happen, but good sales happen regularly. Research and watching spot market pricing of precious metals is the first step, and selling to reliable buyers is the second. Scottsdale Bullion and Coin, for example, will purchase gold bullion coins at very fair prices, making it a good source to sell gold and silver coins. It is possible to sell privately, but always make sure to get paid first before releasing a coin. And don’t trust credit card payments unless you are protected from chargebacks. Many scammers buy a coin and then claim to their credit card company it was never delivered. The charge gets reversed, and the seller is then out both the coin and the payment.
One of the most frequently asked questions is, "What gold bar should I buy?" In addition to the size of the gold bar having an impact on overall price and premium above the fluctuating gold spot price, the gold bar’s mint may affect a gold bullion bar’s pricing slightly.  A highly recognizable government gold bar may sell for a few dollars more than a like kind gold bar from a less recognizable privately minted gold bar when you decide to sell your gold bar back to a gold bullion dealer.  A gold bullion bar guaranteed and produced by a sovereign national mint such as the Royal Canadian Mint (RCM) will typically have a higher premium or slightly higher price when buying, but government guaranteed gold bars typically receive a higher buy back premium when you go to sell your gold bar back to gold dealers or other investors. Similarly, a gold bullion bar from a highly recognizable private gold mint may sell for a slightly higher premium than a smaller less recognizable private gold mint. Live buyback prices for gold bars can be found online on the corresponding product page.
Perhaps the biggest factor in the growth of silver mining, however, was the Spanish discovery of The New World in 1492. Production in the Americas by far exceeded anything that had been done previously. Silver mining continued to grow and flourish, and eventually new discoveries were made in other parts of the world such as China, Canada, Australia and Africa. In the past century, the technological advances made by humans have helped drive silver production to new heights and are ever increasing its demand. In fact, global mine production of silver now averages 671 million troy ounces per year!

For those investors looking for variable prices, more designs, and greater options when it comes to the gold they buy, gold bullion bars are an excellent choice. As diverse as gold bullion coins can be, there’s no matching the variety available when you buy gold bars online. Gold bullion bars are offered by private mints and refineries located around the globe. There is no government backing or central bank support, but these refineries have certified assayers (in many cases) checking the quality, purity, and weight of each product before it leaves the refinery. Gold bars feature at least .999 pure gold as well, with .9999 the standard in most products. Further, the weights offered for gold bars range from as small as 1 Gram to as large as 5 Kilograms. The following are some of the many gold bullion bars you’ll find available:


Canadian Gold Maple Leaf: The Canadian Gold Maple Leaf was issued in 1979, making it the second-oldest gold bullion coin behind only the South African Gold Krugerrand coin. Originally issued in .999 pure gold, from November 1982 onward the coins have included .9999 pure gold content. The coins have a sugar maple leaf on the reverse, with Queen Elizabeth II’s effigy on the obverse.

Many types of gold "accounts" are available. Different accounts impose varying types of intermediation between the client and their gold. One of the most important differences between accounts is whether the gold is held on an allocated (fully reserved) or unallocated (pooled) basis. Unallocated gold accounts are a form of fractional reserve banking and do not guarantee an equal exchange for metal in the event of a run on the issuer's gold on deposit. Another major difference is the strength of the account holder's claim on the gold, in the event that the account administrator faces gold-denominated liabilities (due to a short or naked short position in gold for example), asset forfeiture, or bankruptcy.

Lunar Series II: The Perth Mint’s most popular series in gold is the Lunar Series II collection. There is a new design each year in this program (2008-2019). Each new design coincides with the animal featured on the Zodiac for the Chinese Lunar Calendar, and these gold coins are available in weights ranging from 1/10 and 1/2 oz to 1 oz, 2 oz, and even 10 oz of pure gold.


People with more limited capital to invest in precious metals cannot divest as much as they would desire. Hence, such buyers usually prefer less expensive and low-risk silver bullion products with lower premiums over spot, offering a modest appreciation over time – granting them with inflation-proof, financial protection. This is the best way to hedge against inflation and is recommended by financial advisers as a good method of balancing portfolios.
Local coin and bullion shops may carry various types of bullion bar and coin as well as numismatics and collectibles. Such shops may, however, carry smaller inventories and charge higher premiums compared to online dealers. This makes sense, after all, given the fact the brick and mortar coin shops tend to have higher operating costs compared to online dealers.

When people buy physical gold, they can store it themselves, have someone store it for them or do a combination of both. Some people keep it in a home safe, storage boxes, or in coin capsules at home. Others store it in a safe deposit box at the bank or other secure location. Safe deposit boxes at the bank are affordable but may offer limited access, based on the hours of the financial institution. The bank does not insure the contents of the box, which means separate insurance should be purchased.
The grading standards are different in different countries. The main standards applied outside the United States are presented in the following table.[11] Coin grading is not an exact science. It is a subjective exercise and depends on the qualification and the experience of the appraiser. Industry leaders were extremely concerned that without a standardized grading system, the rare coin industry could face enormous problems. Therefore, on February 3, 1986, the Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) was formed and in 1987 the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation. Both associations have the same goal of grading coins. Other prominent grading organizations are the American Numismatic Association Certification Service (ANACS) and the Independent Coin Graders. The grading is usually done by three independent appraisers. A grading finalizer assigns the final grade of the coin and thereafter the coin is sonically sealed in a protective, inert plastic holder known as "slab".[7] Other associations followed and are at present active.[12] This third-party appraisal of a coin's physical condition, backed by a guarantee, and a national network of reputable coin dealers provided an extremely reliable form of protection for rare coin consumers who could then participate in the coin market with greater confidence.
When it comes to purchasing or selling silver bullion, the market value for silver (also referred to as "spot price") is the basis for all pricing. View the current spot price for silver. Almost all silver products on SD Bullion operate on a silver spot price plus the product premium (also referred to as "over spot") formula to determine the final price. For example, if the market value for silver is X and the product premium is Y, the final price would be X+Y=Z. Premium pricing is mostly consistent per product but the market value for silver changes vastly on a minute by minute basis. Our market feed integrates live up to the minute market prices from worldwide markets. We offer both live and historical market data available on our website's Live Market Prices page. You can customize charts to research and find trends in pricing and compare to other precious metal types.
A coin or bar dealer will not buy gold from you at the spot price, as they have to factor in their business overheads. They also have to consider the chance that the bar or coin is not what they think it is. Some rarer coins might be quoted at prices above spot, but in gold bullion products like small bars, Sovereigns or Krugerrands, this usually results in you receiving 2-5% less than the spot price when you come to sell.
As of 2009 holders of COMEX gold futures have experienced problems taking delivery of their metal. Along with chronic delivery delays, some investors have received delivery of bars not matching their contract in serial number and weight. The delays cannot be easily explained by slow warehouse movements, as the daily reports of these movements show little activity. Because of these problems, there are concerns that COMEX may not have the gold inventory to back its existing warehouse receipts.[55]
Krugerands became politically controversial during the 1970s and 1980s because of the association with an apartheid government. As a result, production of the coins varied, with levels of production increasing since 1998. The Krugerrand weighs 1.0909 troy ounces and is made from 91.67 percent pure gold (22 karats). As a result, the coin has one troy ounce of gold with the remaining weight in copper. Three sizes have been available since 1980 including ½ oz, ¼ oz, and 1/10 oz. Proof Krugerands are also available for collectors. They differ from bullion coins because the proofs have 220 serrations on the coin's edge, rather than 160.

Although central banks do not generally announce gold purchases in advance, some, such as Russia, have expressed interest in growing their gold reserves again as of late 2005.[22] In early 2006, China, which only holds 1.3% of its reserves in gold,[23] announced that it was looking for ways to improve the returns on its official reserves. Some bulls hope that this signals that China might reposition more of its holdings into gold, in line with other central banks. Chinese investors began pursuing investment in gold as an alternative to investment in the Euro after the beginning of the Eurozone crisis in 2011. China has since become the world’s top gold consumer as of 2013.[24]
Although central banks do not generally announce gold purchases in advance, some, such as Russia, have expressed interest in growing their gold reserves again as of late 2005.[22] In early 2006, China, which only holds 1.3% of its reserves in gold,[23] announced that it was looking for ways to improve the returns on its official reserves. Some bulls hope that this signals that China might reposition more of its holdings into gold, in line with other central banks. Chinese investors began pursuing investment in gold as an alternative to investment in the Euro after the beginning of the Eurozone crisis in 2011. China has since become the world’s top gold consumer as of 2013.[24]
Imagine yourself sitting in a stream swirling water in a metal pan, desperately hoping to see a small yellow glint. That flash would be light reflecting off gold, the metal that you might have traveled across a continent to find in the early 1850s. But why? What's so special about gold that people were willing to uproot their lives in the hopes of finding this precious metal? And, more important, why does gold still hold such a prominent place in our global economy? Here's the introduction to gold you need before you start investing in it, including a look at your choices -- jewelry, coins, bullion, gold certificates, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), mutual funds, futures contracts, gold mining stocks, and gold streaming and royalty companies -- and a discussion of the best gold investing strategy for beginners.
However, some gold dealers use these facts to scare investors into buying overpriced coins. Some history: Hello, the U.S. is no longer on the gold standard and hasn’t been since 1971. And the limit on gold ownership in the U.S. was repealed in 1974. So notwithstanding the paranoia-laden pitches of some salesmen (and right-wing radio hosts), there is no danger of gold confiscation.
Each year the Royal Canadian Mint produces the Canadian Gold Maple Leaf bullion coin that is issued by the Government of the Dominion of Canada. The standard gold Royal Canadian Mint coins weighs one troy ounce with a face value of $50 Canadian dollars. It is one of the purest gold coins in the world at .99999 millesimal fineness. Other sizes frequently sold inMaple Leaf Coins to investors include 1 gram, 1/25 oz, 1/20 oz, 1/10 oz and ½ oz. The obverse features a profile of Queen Elizabeth II of Canada with the Canadian Maple Leaf on the reverse. Security features were introduced in 2013 and 2015 that are only visible under magnification.
Our customer service has been and will always be a priority. Should you have a question about prospective orders, orders in process, or completed orders, simply contact our phone support, live chat support, or email support for a prompt response. We are always willing and able to assist you with an existing order or to answer any questions that you may have.
False Claims – Unscrupulous sellers often overprice their coins, lie about the bullion content, or try to pass off ordinary bullion coins as rare collectible coins. Some fraudulent dealers may even try to sell coins that aren't bullion coins at all. Others may try to sell bullion pieces with the same design as coins from the U.S. Mint, but in different sizes. Indeed, private mints issue coins that look like bullion coins minted by foreign governments, but may have little or no gold content. Your best defense is to study the market and choose your dealer carefully.
Coins, bullion, and bars. If you're looking to own physical gold for its investment value, then coins, bullion, and bars are the best option. However, there are markups to consider here, as well. It costs money to take raw gold and turn it into a coin, and that's often passed on to the end customer. Also, most coin dealers will add a markup to their prices to compensate them for acting as middlemen. Think of it like a commission for a stock trade; coin dealers have to make a living, too. Perhaps the best option for most investors is to buy gold bullion directly from the U.S. Mint, so you know you are dealing with a reputable dealer.  
A. Over the past few years, as concern about a financial and economic breakdown spread, there were periods of gold coin bottlenecks and actual shortages. In 2008-2009 at the height of the financial crisis, demand was so great that the national mints could not keep up with it. The flow of historic gold coins from Europe was also insufficient to meet accelerating demand both there and in the United States. Premiums shot-up on all gold and silver coins and a scramble developed for what was available. There is an old saying that the best time to buy gold is when everything is quiet. I would underline that sentiment.
American Gold Eagles are widely considered the official Gold coin of the United States. These beautiful coins feature Lady Liberty standing tall, a symbol of democracy and freedom. The heraldic eagle clutching an olive branch rounds out the images that are an important part of the history of the United States. These coins come in four sizes, providing investors a unique opportunity to diversify their portfolio.
Due to gold's reputation as a safe-haven, investors are drawn to the precious metal when confidence in other forms of investment is low, raising the gold price and supporting the idea that bullion is a safe asset. Conversely, many investors are often attracted away from gold when the economy is performing strongly and banks, shares and other financial assets are able to deliver regular returns, often pushing the price of gold down.
And then there are operational issues, since mining is expensive, time-consuming, and often dangerous. A problem at a mine, a major exploration success, or any number of other operational issues can cause a miner's stock performance to diverge materially from the price of gold. Small miners, meanwhile, often provide the most upside opportunity and downside risk, since tiny moves in the price of gold can sometimes be the difference between these miners making a profit or losing money. And then there are companies like Northern Dynasty Minerals, where the only asset is a mine under development. The stock is cheap today, making it something of an option on the price of gold since the value of the mine (called the Pebble Project) won't be realized for years. But if the Pebble Project gets built, Northern Dynasty could see material stock-price gains.
While it is next to impossible to buy Silver at spot, reputable retailers such as APMEX make it easy to get the best price available at a competitive premium over spot. The term spot refers to the current market price for a 1 oz unit of Gold, a rate that continually fluctuates during the day. Investors want to pay as close to the current spot price as possible with small premiums giving the best chance at a good margin when selling later. There are, however, other factors that make a higher premium worth paying, such as a history of appreciation, availability, or reputation of quality from the mint of origin. While all Precious Metals including Gold are sold at a premium, this small additional cost is what pays for expenses such as mining, refining, production, and collectible market value.
(Reader Note: USAGOLD offers an Online Order Desk as a subsidiary service for our clientele. Here you can choose from a full assortment of established investment items including modern gold and silver bullion coins and bullion bars, historic fractional gold coins and historic U.S. gold coins. At our Online Order Desk, you can order confidently any time day or night and on weekends at very competitive rates.)
This article started off looking to answer a very simple question: Is gold a safe investment? Like so many things in life, however, simple questions can have very complex answers. In the case of gold, it is a risky asset class, and it would be unwise to invest only in gold. However, because gold is viewed as a store of wealth, you shouldn't dismiss it as an investment option. Investors tend to flock to gold when they are scared, which boosts its value when assets such as stocks are falling. It just needs to be paired with a more broadly diversified portfolio so you can benefit from the non-correlated nature of gold's performance. And, yes, that will require rebalancing your portfolio every so often, maybe once a year or when allocations get materially out of line.
For many centuries, gold coins were the primary form of money. They started to fall into disuse by the early 20th century. In 1933, most countries switched from the gold standard to define the value of a dollar. This was because of the hoarding that occurred during the Great Depression. As a result, most countries stopped making gold coins to use as currency. The United States did not make a complete change until 1971 when it finally ended the draconian ban on investment ownership. For numismatic purposes, gold coins must not include alloys such as manganese brass. Some legal tender coins are not circulated, which means they are primarily for investment and collectors.

The thing is, gold and stocks don't always do the same thing at the same time. For example, when the stock market is doing well, gold often lags behind. And since the market has a long history of heading higher over time, owning gold as your only investment would clearly be a risky proposition. But the interplay between stocks and gold is where gold's value lies for investors -- and why it can be a safe investment if you use it properly.


We should not trust the fiat currency and highly consider bartering abroad. Boycotting goods is the only sensible way to restore power to the people and end monopolies. Communities should produce their own food supply, self-police and educate as they see fit. There isn't any product or material that we absolutely have to have that isn't within local reach. It is a shame to see the level of consumerism and government dependence overcome the desire for knowledge and skilled labor.
The Perth Mint and quality production are nearly synonymous. That is evident with their Lunar coins series and Kangaroo Gold coins. Both are popular with investors not only for their quality strike, but also for their fine Gold content. Kangaroos and Lunar coins have coin value to them, diversifying any investment portfolio. Multiple sizes are available for these coins, providing quality options for investors.
Reverse designs in the Queen’s Beast Series include 10 different heraldic beasts in all. Launched in 2016 with the Lion of England, other designs include the Red Dragon of Wales, Black Bull of Clarence, and the Unicorn of Scotland. The obverse of each coin features Queen Elizabeth II’s effigy, with all reverse and obverse designs from Jody Clark of the Royal Mint.
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