When looking for an American gold eagle, you'll come across some certified bullion. This means that an organization with a strong professional reputation rated the coin as authentic. Investors look for those certified by the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation or the Professional Coin Grading Service. Both organizations guarantee that the product is authentic and that it contains the right mixture of metals. These organizations also assign a numeric rating to the American Eagles and similar designs based on its value and condition.
Though most bars, coins, and rounds manufactured across the world, be it in Austria, USA, or China, contain 99.9% pure gold, a few mints like the Royal Canadian Mint surpass the typical purity levels by using 99.99% pure gold in their products. Even though a 0.09% purity increase might not seem like a lot, it vaults the gold products into an elite category of products.

Many investors buying gold turn to gold bullion coins from sovereign mints. Gold coins are a popular choice because the weight and purity of the coins are backed by a central bank and sovereign. Moreover, gold coins are produced on an annual basis to meet consumer demand, so there’s rarely a shortage of gold coins available to those investors who want to purchase the precious metal in this form. The following are some of the most popular gold coins for sale:
However, there's a downside as well. Because a miner is running an operating business, you are also facing the risk that things might not work out as planned. As noted above, mines don't always produce as much gold as expected, workers sometimes go on strike, and, unfortunately, mining is risky and disasters can take place that halt production and cost lives. All in all, gold miners can perform better or worse than gold -- depending on what's going on at the specific miner you're looking at.
Coins in a mint sealed monster box. Date of the mint box is fulfilled on a availability in the warehouse. Each coin is. 999 pure silver, making this one of the finest silver coins ever minted. The obverse side of this large coin features a design based on the earlier “Walking Liberty” coin, while the reverse side features an image of a bald eagle holding a shield beneath 13 stars.
Some people out there appreciate the true beauty of a beautifully minted silver coin. Take the coins from the famous American Silver Eagle program for example, with obverses featuring Weinman’s beautiful Walking Liberty and the reverses depicting Mercanti’s rendition of a Bald Eagle and a shield, a symbol of American strength and pride. Collectors buy these products for their ‘artistic’ or ‘collectible’ value rather than their melt value. For them, there is no right or wrong; they should pick the products that they consider aesthetically appealing.
The U.S. government continued on with this gold tradition by establishing a bimetallic standard in 1792. The bimetallic standard simply stated that every monetary unit in the U.S. had to be backed by either gold or silver. For example, one U.S. dollar was the equivalent of 24.75 grains of gold. In other words, the coins that were used as money simply represented the gold (or silver) that was presently deposited at the bank.
Circulation is a term that means the coin was once used in the general public. Any money that you have in your pocket right now is an example of circulated money. Uncirculated money is money that never went out to the public. These gold coins come directly from financial institutions or from the mint. This may refer to collector products, too. Manufacturers design these products specifically for collectors. Many feature iconic people or images such as former American Presidents or historic landmarks on each side. Collectors like these gold eagles because they know that no one ever touched the metal before.
On the other end of the spectrum is a school of thought that asserts gold is an asset with various intrinsic qualities that make it unique and necessary for investors to hold in their portfolios. In this article, we will focus on the purpose of gold in the modern era, why it still belongs in investors' portfolios and the different ways to invest in the gold market.
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