Once you have decided on the quantity of gold bullion to purchase, your Monex Account Representative will assist you in executing your order over the phone. Your purchase and price will be confirmed on a voice recorded line after your acknowledgment, and a written confirmation will be sent to you with the details of your order. Payment may be made after you order, but must be initiated on the day of purchase, which means you must mail or wire funds on the day of your purchase. You can have your metal (a) shipped to your home; (b) made available for pick-up at over 30 facilities across the U.S. and Canada; or (c) have your metal delivered to a bank/depository for storage.
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Gold shows typically deal more in numismatic, or collector coins, which have high markups, are illiquid, and are valued based more on rarity or historical significance than gold content. If a dealer does have any bullion, it is likely to be a limited selection. While numismatics can be a good investment, it takes a tremendous amount of research to avoid being taken advantage of by an unscrupulous dealer.
That’s why Mladjenovic prefers gold bullion coins. The price of the 1-ounce, 24-karat Maple Leaf approximately matches gold’s spot price and enjoyed a meteoric rise between 2005 and 2011, when the price of gold more than quadrupled. But what goes up sometimes comes down: The price of gold coins has tracked the recent decline in the price of gold, as well.
Additionally, the metal of kings has been used as currency for centuries. The free market has selected it to be used as money for thousands of years, partly because it is transportable, with a high value-to-weight ratio. Its density makes it more difficult to counterfeit. It is also fungible in that all gold ounces are worth the same.  And it’s divisible, meaning that it does not lose its value just because it is broken into smaller increments.  And it’s durable – not corroding or tarnishing over the years. Historically, the first gold coins were made in Anatolia during the 6th century BC. Most modern bullion coins come in 1 ounce, ½ oz, ¼ oz, 1/10 oz, and even 1/20 oz sizes.
With that said, it's worth noting that many silver bullion coin programs also have proof collectible options. These coins offer the same design as their bullion counterpart but deliver collectible value courtesy of a more visually brilliant design finish and lower, set mintage figures. The Proof American Silver Eagle Coin and the Proof Australian Silver Kangaroo are just two examples of silver bullion coin available in a collectible version as well.

Though this interview will help you start safely on the road to gold ownership, it is just an overview. If you would like more detailed information, I would recommend my book, The ABCs of Gold Investing: How to Protect and Build Your Wealth With Gold, which covers the who, what, when, where, why and how of gold ownership in detail. You can also shortcut the learning curve by contacting our offices and asking to speak with one of our expert client advisors who will be happy to answer your questions and help you get off to a solid start.
Exchange-traded funds, or ETFs, are investment companies that are legally classified as open-end companies or unit investment trusts (UITs), but that differ from traditional open-end companies and UITs.[51] The main differences are that ETFs do not sell directly to investors and they issue their shares in what are called "Creation Units" (large blocks such as blocks of 50,000 shares). Also, the Creation Units may not be purchased with cash but a basket of securities that mirrors the ETF's portfolio. Usually, the Creation Units are split up and re-sold on a secondary market.

In 2008, despite the financial crisis, some investors continued to hedge against a dollar decline caused by two new factors. One was the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing program, launched in December 2008. In that program, the Fed exchanged credit for bank Treasurys. The Fed simply created the credit out of thin air. Investors were concerned this increase in the money supply would create inflation.
A. Over the past few years, as concern about a financial and economic breakdown spread, there were periods of gold coin bottlenecks and actual shortages. In 2008-2009 at the height of the financial crisis, demand was so great that the national mints could not keep up with it. The flow of historic gold coins from Europe was also insufficient to meet accelerating demand both there and in the United States. Premiums shot-up on all gold coins and a scramble developed for what was available. There is an old saying that the best time to buy gold is when everything is quiet. I would underline that sentiment.

The Austrian Mint is responsible for issuing one of the first great gold bullion coin programs. Debuting in 1989, the Austrian Gold Philharmonic is the nation’s official gold coin and reflects the arts and culture of Austria as represented by the Vienna Philharmonic orchestra. The Gold Philharmonic coins debuted in 1989 with 1 oz and 1/4 oz options, and over time has grown to include 1/10 oz (1991), 1/2 oz (1994), and 1/25 oz (2014) coins. Gold Philharmonic coins had face values in Austrian Schillings from 1989 to 2001, and following the adoption of the European Union common currency in 2002 issued the coins with face values in Euros (€). The Austrian Gold Philharmonic has the following designs:
Generally, the term “bullion”  includes any coin which is readily deliverable and trades based on the daily price of gold. Only a few items need to be reported upon sale, so don’t allow dealers to talk you out of buying bullion coins because of reporting requirements. The newer U.S. coins such as Buffalos and Eagles are specifically defined as numismatic coins in the legislation that created the mandate and they are not reportable by the dealer you sell to. However the IRS requires you to report profits on ANY numismatic or bullion item.

Investment Grade Coins are higher quality and more rare than bullion coins. These coins are also graded and are enclosed in a protective slab to ensure and preserve the condition of the coin. A study commissioned by the U.S. Congress has proven that certain Investment Grade Coins are shown to have an annual return of 15%. Investment Grade Coins are for investors planning to hold onto their investment for at least 3 years.
The grading standards are different in different countries. The main standards applied outside the United States are presented in the following table.[11] Coin grading is not an exact science. It is a subjective exercise and depends on the qualification and the experience of the appraiser. Industry leaders were extremely concerned that without a standardized grading system, the rare coin industry could face enormous problems. Therefore, on February 3, 1986, the Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) was formed and in 1987 the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation. Both associations have the same goal of grading coins. Other prominent grading organizations are the American Numismatic Association Certification Service (ANACS) and the Independent Coin Graders. The grading is usually done by three independent appraisers. A grading finalizer assigns the final grade of the coin and thereafter the coin is sonically sealed in a protective, inert plastic holder known as "slab".[7] Other associations followed and are at present active.[12] This third-party appraisal of a coin's physical condition, backed by a guarantee, and a national network of reputable coin dealers provided an extremely reliable form of protection for rare coin consumers who could then participate in the coin market with greater confidence.
Streaming and royalty companies. The last option for investing in gold is to buy stock in a streaming and royalty company. For most investors, this is probably the best all-around option for investing in gold, as long as you don't want direct physical exposure to the metal. Streaming and royalty companies like Wheaton Precious Metals Corp. and Royal Gold, Inc. provide miners cash up front for the right to buy gold and other metals from specific mines at reduced rates in the future. They are like specialty finance companies that get paid in gold, allowing them to avoid many of the headaches and risks associated with running a mine.
Due to gold's reputation as a safe-haven, investors are drawn to the precious metal when confidence in other forms of investment is low, raising the gold price and supporting the idea that bullion is a safe asset. Conversely, many investors are often attracted away from gold when the economy is performing strongly and banks, shares and other financial assets are able to deliver regular returns, often pushing the price of gold down.

South African Krugerrands first came on the market in 1967. For several years, it was the only option available for Gold investors. The Gold Krugerrands are steeped in a rich history that is not only familiar to their country, but also to the world. Krugerrands remain a popular Gold coin with investors everywhere. The reverse depicts the Springbok antelope, the national animal of South Africa. The obverse shows the likeness of the first and only South African President Paul Kruger.

Bullion coins can be bought directly from the government agency or institution that prints the coin, if supplies are available. Most are minted on a limited run, and some run out very quickly. That leaves the secondary market from which to buy gold coins—either coin dealers or private owners. People buy coins for various reasons but the big drivers are investment to profit on changes in precious metal values or for collection. Popular coins include the South African Krugerrand, the Canadian Maple, and the U.S. Gold Eagle coins.
Gold coins are an investment that preserve wealth, a hedge against inflation, and a safe haven during times of global uncertainty. Buying gold coins is a great way to purchase physical precious metals as opposed to non-physical gold ownership, such as gold exchange-traded funds (ETFs), gold exchange-traded notes (ETNs), futures contracts, and mining stocks. Precious metals, such as silver, gold, and platinum can also be purchased as bars and rounds. Gold coins can be stored in safety deposit boxes or in a secure place in your home. As a value investor, you should try to purchase gold coins as close the spot price as you can. Smaller gold coins, such as 1/10 oz, will have a higher premium -- but they may be easier to carry and use in a crisis, particularly given their smaller increment of value.
Step back from those statistics, and it's clear that roughly 90% of gold demand is based on its intrinsic value. This is something of a historical issue, since the world basically chose gold as a currency thousands of years ago. In fact, at one point, most paper money was backed by a country's holdings of physical gold. That time has passed, of course, with fiat currencies now backed by the promise of a government to make good on its obligations.
The biggest initial risks after a mine is up and running are that the gold isn't as plentiful as hoped or that it's harder to extract than expected. While mining is in progress, there are all sorts of operational issues to deal with, from labor relations to the risk of disasters like a mine collapse or deadly gas leaks. And once all of the gold that can be economically extracted has been, miners generally have to close the mine and return the site back to its pre-mined state.
All information contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only and does not constitute investment advice. Please note that certain products, storage and delivery services will be dependent on the type of account you hold. Bullion markets can be volatile and the value of Bullion may fluctuate dependent on the market value of precious metals. As such, investments in Bullion involve a degree of risk, which may make them unsuitable for certain persons. Before making any investment decision, you may wish to seek advice from your financial, legal, tax and accounting advisers. You should carefully consider the risks associated with investing in Bullion, taking into account your own individual financial needs and circumstances. Investments in Bullion should only be made as part of a diversified investment portfolio and investment advice should be sought before any investment is made. Historic financial performance of Bullion is not indicative of and does not guarantee future financial performance.
A silver round is exactly what it sounds like. It is a round piece of pure silver. This form is similar to a coin, but unlike a coin it does not carry any face value. Because silver rounds cannot be used as legal tender, these bullion products may be produced by government and private mints, as well. Silver rounds come in various sizes, but like silver bullion coins the most common size is 1oz. Silver rounds carry the smallest premium over the spot silver price, making them a very good choice for investors looking to accumulate silver.
A huge amount of investment in gold comes from individuals looking to protect their wealth from such dangers. Gold and other precious metals have been used as forms of currency and as symbols of status in jewellery and other items for thousands of years, testament to their intrinsic value. Precious metals have outlived other forms of currency and it is this timeless ability to maintain a high value that attracts investors who believe that gold is a safe investment.

The official gold bullion coin of the United States is the American Gold Eagle. In 1986, the U.S. Mint first released eagles in accordance with the Gold Bullion Act of 1985. Often the weight is used to describe these coins because the term “eagle” was the U.S. designation for ten dollar gold coins distributed prior to 1933. Lady Liberty appears on the obverse of the coin. The reverse features an eagle carrying an olive branch. He is flying over a nest with a female eagle accompanied by hatchlings. The U.S. government guarantees the current eagles contain an accurate amount of gold weight in troy ounces or units. These are available in denominations of 1/10 oz, ¼ oz, ½ oz, and 1 oz gold coins. The face values are $5, $10, $25, and $50 USD. While eagles are legal tender, their intrinsic value is far greater as based on their troy weight and the current prices of gold.
The Krugerrand gold coin was first minted in South Africa in 1967 and was produced by the South African Mint. By 1980, this gold coin accounted for 90 percent of the global coin market. Kruger is the man featured on the obverse and rand refers to the South African unit of currency. Production levels of the Krugerrand have varied over the past half century. They went down in the years associated with the apartheid government and are increasing again.
Generally, the term “bullion”  includes any coin which is readily deliverable and trades based on the daily price of gold. Only a few items need to be reported upon sale, so don’t allow dealers to talk you out of buying bullion coins because of reporting requirements. The newer U.S. coins such as Buffalos and Eagles are specifically defined as numismatic coins in the legislation that created the mandate and they are not reportable by the dealer you sell to. However the IRS requires you to report profits on ANY numismatic or bullion item.
The value of numismatic coins is determined by features such as condition, age, rarity and the number of coins originally minted. An example of a coveted collector's coin is the Spur Royal. The grade of the coin also matters, which is a numerical score assigned based on a visual evaluation of the amount of wear. Basic grades are good, fine, and un-circulated. The Universal rarity scale and the Sheldon rarity scale are the scales used to determine how rare a coin might be.
The value of numismatic coins is determined by features such as condition, age, rarity and the number of coins originally minted. An example of a coveted collector's coin is the Spur Royal. The grade of the coin also matters, which is a numerical score assigned based on a visual evaluation of the amount of wear. Basic grades are good, fine, and un-circulated. The Universal rarity scale and the Sheldon rarity scale are the scales used to determine how rare a coin might be.
Precious metals in bulk form are known as bullion, and are traded on commodity markets. Bullion metals may be cast into ingots, or minted into coins. The defining attribute of bullion is that it is valued by its mass and purity rather than by a face value as money. While obsolete gold coins are primarily collected for their numismatic value, gold bullion coins today derive their value from the metal (gold) content – and as such are viewed by some investors as a "hedge" against inflation or a store of value. Many nations mint bullion coins. According to British HM Revenue & Customs investment coins are generally coins that have been minted after 1800, have a purity of not less than 900 thousandths, or have been legal tender in its country of origin.[5] Although nominally issued as legal tender, these coins' face value as currency is far below that of their value as bullion.
An important way to examine the relationship between assets is by looking at correlations. Effectively, how do two investments move in relation to each other. For example, the correlation between the entire stock market and just the midcap segment over the past 10 years or so is roughly 0.98. That means they move in virtual lockstep, as you might logically expect. Gold, however, has a correlation with the stock market of 0.04 over that same span. Essentially, gold does its own thing. 
The gold that miners dig up goes into a number of different industries today. The largest by far is jewelry, which accounts for around 50% of gold demand. Another 40% comes from direct physical investment in gold, including gold used to create coins, bullion, medals, and gold bars. This broad demand category includes individuals, central banks, and, more recently, exchange-traded funds that purchase gold on behalf of others. The remaining demand for gold comes from industry, for use in things such as dentistry, heat shields, and tech gadgets. 
For centuries, buying gold has been recognized as one of the best ways to preserve one's wealth and purchasing power. Gold is a unique investment, one that has served mankind well for thousands of years. From the times of ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans to more modern times, man has been fascinated with the beauty and magic of gold, and with its power to change men's lives.
A. Over the past few years, as concern about a financial and economic breakdown spread, there were periods of gold coin bottlenecks and actual shortages. In 2008-2009 at the height of the financial crisis, demand was so great that the national mints could not keep up with it. The flow of historic gold coins from Europe was also insufficient to meet accelerating demand both there and in the United States. Premiums shot-up on all gold coins and a scramble developed for what was available. There is an old saying that the best time to buy gold is when everything is quiet. I would underline that sentiment.
A. Traditionally, wealthy, aristocratic European and Asian families have kept a strong percentage of their assets in gold as a protective factor. The long term economic picture for the United States has changed enormously over the past several years. As a result, that same philosophy has taken hold here particularly among those interested in preserving their wealth both for themselves and for their families from one generation to the next. In recent years, we have helped a good many family trusts diversify with gold coins and bullion at the advice of their portfolio managers.
Gold bars and ingots are the most popular way to invest in gold and generally the form of gold bullion that most people think about. A gold bar can come in a variety of sizes from 1 gram to 1 kilo. Actually, a gold bar can be as big as someone’s imagination. Currently, the largest gold bar in history was produced by Mitsubishi Materials Corporation. The bar weighed 551 pounds and would be worth over $11 million with a spot price of $1275.
During the Middle Ages gold coins continued to be struck, and these are scarce, too. With the discovery of the New World this all changed. The amount of gold flowing out of the mines was enormous, and the Spanish who controlled much of it, used it to strike one of the most fabled coins of all times: The Gold Doubloon. Pirates killed for it, hurricanes sunk them by the chest full, and captain Ahab nailed one to the mast of the Pequod, to be claimed by the first sailor who spotted Moby Dick.
Gold coin prices are determined by a variety of different factors, including condition, availability, and composition. Uncirculated coins that have never been handled in the marketplace will typically bring a high price because the condition is unblemished. Accessibility is a factor in Gold coin pricing because if a coin is in short supply, retailers can charge a higher price to collectors. The composition of a particular currency is critical to value since coins made with a more significant percentage of Gold have more melt value.

Research is everything. Your decision to buy gold online wouldn’t have been taken lightly and should be backed by your own research. Much the same, when it comes to selecting your chosen bullion dealer, again research is vital. The Internet is the best place to conduct your research. The Internet holds information about the impartial experiences, opinions and recommendations of millions of people all around the world. It sounds obvious, but why not start your research by simply typing in the bullion dealers brand name into Google. The Internet really is the world's largest open forum in which companies have no control. It will become quickly apparent if a bullion dealer has a negative online reputation, in which case they should be avoided at all costs.
You may remember seeing these large gold bullion bars in movies such as "Three Kings," and the old James Bond movie "Goldfinger." Bars like these make up most of the world's gold bullion owned by governments and central banks. These are the "London good delivery" gold bullion bars of approximately 400 troy ounce size, refined and cast by the various private refiners worldwide, and accepted for 'delivery' into London and other major gold bullion markets.

Another factor to take into account when purchasing gold instruments is whether to buy new freshly-minted products or to look for relatively cheaper secondary-market gold goods. Like any other product or commodity, most everyone automatically prefers shiny and new. Moreover, there is a widespread myth among some investors that secondary-market precious metals products have a lower resale value because of their condition and lack of finish. Depending on the sentiment and market condition when the investor is looking to sell, this is not always the case. However, collectors who treasure gold coins for their collectible value will, in most cases, prefer mint condition and near-perfect or perfect graded gold coins.


You may remember seeing these large gold bullion bars in movies such as "Three Kings," and the old James Bond movie "Goldfinger." Bars like these make up most of the world's gold bullion owned by governments and central banks. These are the "London good delivery" gold bullion bars of approximately 400 troy ounce size, refined and cast by the various private refiners worldwide, and accepted for 'delivery' into London and other major gold bullion markets.
The two main reasons to invest in bullion coins are to hedge against other market investment forces and to start building future returns. Many gold coin purchases are held for a long-term period versus short trading. This is often so that the investment can recover both value and additional mark ups and commissions charged on coins for sale at the retail level. Even mints charge a markup over the spot price value of a new bullion coin. So some period of wait is needed to let the value appreciate.
Gold bullion coins come in several different sizes, providing a diverse selection. Investors of all levels can find value in Gold coins, as well as Gold bars and rounds. Whether you are buying bullion for an investment, adding to a collection, or simply hedging the market, what Gold you buy plays a major role within your portfolio, especially understanding the value of your purchase. Shop Gold bullion coins and rounds today.
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