Gold-colored coins have made a comeback in many currencies. However, "gold coin" (in numismatic terminology) always refers to a coin that is (more or less) made of gold, and does not include coins made of manganese brass or other alloys. Furthermore, many countries continue to make legal tender gold coins, but these are primarily meant for collectors and investment purposes and are not meant for circulation.
The demand for jewelry is fairly constant, though economic downturns do, obviously, lead to some temporary reductions in demand from this industry. The demand from investors, including central banks, however, tends to ebb and flow with the economy and investor sentiment. So, when investors are worried about the economy, they often buy gold, and based on the increase in demand, push its price higher. If you want to keep track of gold's ups and downs, you can easily do so at the website of the World Gold Council, an industry trade group backed by some of the largest gold miners in the world. 
Gold certificates are usually for unallocated gold, which means there's no specific gold associated with the certificate even though the company says it has enough gold to back all outstanding certificates. You can buy allocated gold certificates, where the certificates represent specific gold bullion, but the costs are higher. The big problem here is that the certificates are really only as good as the company backing them, sort of like banks before FDIC insurance was created. This is why one of the most desirable options for gold certificates is the Perth Mint, which is backed by the government of Western Australia. That said, if you are going to simply buy a paper representation of gold, you might want to consider exchange-traded funds instead. 
Clearly, there's more to understand about streaming companies, but a short list of benefits includes widely diversified portfolios, contractually built-in low prices that lead to wide margins in good years and bad, and exposure to gold price changes (since streaming companies make money by selling the gold they buy from the miners). That said, none of the major streaming companies has a pure gold portfolio, with silver the most common added exposure. Franco-Nevada Corp., the largest streaming and royalty company, also has exposure to oil and gas drilling. So you'll need to do a little homework here to fully understand what commodity exposures you'll get from your investment. And while streaming companies avoid many of the risks of running a mine, they don't completely sidestep them: If a mine isn't producing any gold, there's nothing for a streaming company to buy.

Gold mining stocks have their benefits and their drawbacks, and aren't the purest way to own gold. If you choose to take this route, you'll want to pay close attention to a company's mining costs, existing mine portfolio, and expansion opportunities at both existing and new assets. All of these will play a role in determining what an investor is willing to pay for a gold miner's stock (in addition to the spot price of the metal itself, of course).


Although central banks do not generally announce gold purchases in advance, some, such as Russia, have expressed interest in growing their gold reserves again as of late 2005.[22] In early 2006, China, which only holds 1.3% of its reserves in gold,[23] announced that it was looking for ways to improve the returns on its official reserves. Some bulls hope that this signals that China might reposition more of its holdings into gold, in line with other central banks. Chinese investors began pursuing investment in gold as an alternative to investment in the Euro after the beginning of the Eurozone crisis in 2011. China has since become the world’s top gold consumer as of 2013.[24]
Bars generally carry lower price premiums than gold bullion coins. However larger bars carry an increased risk of forgery due to their less stringent parameters for appearance. While bullion coins can be easily weighed and measured against known values to confirm their veracity, most bars cannot, and gold buyers often have bars re-assayed. Larger bars also have a greater volume in which to create a partial forgery using a tungsten-filled cavity, which may not be revealed by an assay. Tungsten is ideal for this purpose because it is much less expensive than gold, but has the same density (19.3 g/cm³).
Local coin and bullion shops may carry various types of bullion bar and coin as well as numismatics and collectibles. Such shops may, however, carry smaller inventories and charge higher premiums compared to online dealers. This makes sense, after all, given the fact the brick and mortar coin shops tend to have higher operating costs compared to online dealers.
Depending on your budget, personal objectives and investment time horizon, you may consider a dollar cost averaging investment strategy. Dollar cost averaging is a conservative approach that involves dividing the total sum to be invested into equal amounts and investing those fixed amounts at regular intervals over time. This approach enables you to scale up or down with the market.
A. The short answer is 'When you need it.' Gold, first and foremost, is wealth insurance. You cannot approach it the way you approach stock or real estate investments. Timing is not the real issue. The first question you need to ask yourself is whether or not you believe you need to own gold. If you answer that question in the affirmative, there is no point in delaying your actual purchase, or waiting for a more favorable price which may or may not appear. Cost averaging can be a good strategy. The real goal is to diversify so that your overall wealth is not compromised by economic dangers and uncertainties like the kind generated by the 2008 financial crisis, or those now unfolding in Europe and Japan.

Gold coin prices are determined by a variety of different factors, including condition, availability, and composition. Uncirculated coins that have never been handled in the marketplace will typically bring a high price because the condition is unblemished. Accessibility is a factor in Gold coin pricing because if a coin is in short supply, retailers can charge a higher price to collectors. The composition of a particular currency is critical to value since coins made with a more significant percentage of Gold have more melt value.


Lunar Series II: The Perth Mint’s most popular series in gold is the Lunar Series II collection. There is a new design each year in this program (2008-2019). Each new design coincides with the animal featured on the Zodiac for the Chinese Lunar Calendar, and these gold coins are available in weights ranging from 1/10 and 1/2 oz to 1 oz, 2 oz, and even 10 oz of pure gold.
If you are interested in becoming a silver investor, there are a couple of good reasons why buying silver coins might be a great option to consider. For example, silver coins are real money. They aren't paper or digital currency that has nothing to back them. It's a hard currency that has historically been valued for providing a form of money that can be used for all types of products and trade. Additionally, this type of money offers a tangible asset that is often preferred over paper or digital forms of money.
Between Nov. 30, 2007, and June 1, 2009, the S&P 500 index fell 36%. The price of gold, on the other hand, rose 25%. Do the quick math and you'll see that gold outperformed stocks by more than 60 percentage points. This was the most recent example of a material and prolonged stock downturn, but it's also a particularly dramatic one because, at the time, there were very real concerns about the viability of the global financial system.
Banks offer us a way of looking after our money, with the promise of a small return every year in the form of interest. Other investments such as equity in a high performing company or a hedge fund offer the potential for enormous returns and can be attractive for those looking to increase their wealth. However, while maximising your wealth is one way to increase your financial security, are these types of asset, for all their potential returns, a safe choice? There are often huge levels of risk involved in these investments and businesses, banks, and other financial institutions are all vulnerable to economic collapse. Even leaving your money in the bank, the lowest risk of these options, can offer very low returns at times and, although they seem stable institutions, are vulnerable to collapse, leaving your hard-earned money in severe danger of being lost entirely.
There are few things as American as the buffalo. The depiction of the American buffalo and Indian Chief is prominent on these Gold coins. This coin reprises the famous James Earle Fraser design from the 1913 Buffalo Nickel. The Gold American Buffalo coins are the first .9999 fine Gold coin produced by the United States Mint, making them a highly popular choice among Gold investors.
Answer. The biggest trap investors fall into is buying a gold investment that bears little or no relationship to his or her objectives. Take safe-haven investors for example. That group makes up 90% of our clientele, and probably a good 75% of the current physical gold market. Most often the safe-haven investor simply wants to add gold coins to his or her portfolio mix, but too often this same investor ends up instead with a leveraged (financed) gold position, or a handful of exotic rare coins, or a position in an ETF that amounts to little more than a bet on the gold price. These have little to do with safe-haven investing, and most investors would be well served to avoid them.
At the end of the day, if you choose to get your gold exposure by owning mining shares, it might be best to buy a mutual fund that focuses on precious metals companies like the aptly named Midas Fund or an ETF like Van Eck Vectors Gold Miners ETF (NYSEMKT:GDX). Note, however, that mutual funds and ETFs like these usually have broadly diversified portfolios that will result in exposure beyond just gold miners. That's not inherently bad, but it does change the dynamics of the investment a little bit.   

Investors who are solely interested in Silver’s stable purchasing power can find security in buying Silver rounds. Silver rounds are circular discs often manufactured by private mints, though sometimes produced by government mints. They have no “face value” and are not recognized as legal tender. Silver rounds are not quite as diverse or collectible as Silver coins, but are an excellent choice for those who want to invest in Silver as an anti-inflation hedge.
Purchasing gold for investment purposes has traditionally been a hedge against inflation and weakness in the US dollar. For thousands of years gold has been a store of wealth and value which continues today. Owning physical precious metals is a strategy of the very wealthy for centuries and although precious metals don't necessarily need to be your only investment, it may be wise to make them a part of your strategy moving forward.
The value of numismatic coins is determined by features such as condition, age, rarity and the number of coins originally minted. An example of a coveted collector's coin is the Spur Royal. The grade of the coin also matters, which is a numerical score assigned based on a visual evaluation of the amount of wear. Basic grades are good, fine, and un-circulated. The Universal rarity scale and the Sheldon rarity scale are the scales used to determine how rare a coin might be.

Gold bars are typically what most people picture when they think of investing in gold. COMEX deliverable, 400 Ounce bars are frequently depicted in the movies or shown in Fort Knox. In truth, gold bars come in a variety of sizes for any investor. One ounce bars are the most common since they easy to calculate using the spot gold price which is also based on one troy ounce. Smaller bars like 1 gram can fit inside a thimble. We offer a range of sizes all the way to 100 Ounce gold bars.


These particular buyers are looking to create a hefty fund to hedge inflation. When seeking to establish a substantial fund, bars become an extremely attractive option, as they are the easiest to stack and store. They come in weights as high as 100 troy ounces, making storage relatively easier when compared to other instruments such as rounds and coins. However, providing adequate safety and security to this massive quantity of silver can be a tedious task. Hence, private, offshore storage depositories, offering top-of-the-line security at reasonable prices, are considered a great option for storage.
Cash for gold – With the rise in the value of gold due to the financial crisis of 2007–2010, there has been a surge in companies that will buy personal gold in exchange for cash, or sell investments in gold bullion and coins. Several of these have prolific marketing plans and high value spokesmen, such as prior vice presidents. Many of these companies are under investigation for a variety of securities fraud claims, as well as laundering money for terrorist organizations.[62][63][64][65] Also, given that ownership is often not verified, many companies are considered to be receiving stolen property, and multiple laws are under consideration as methods to curtail this.[66][67]
Answer. We probably get that question more than any other -- pretty much on a daily basis. The answer, however, is not as straightforward as you might think. What you buy depends upon your goals. We usually answer the "What should I buy?" question with one of our own: "Why are you interested in buying gold?" If your goal is simply to hedge financial uncertainty and/or capitalize on price movement, then contemporary bullion coins will serve your purposes. Those concerned with the possibility of capital controls and a gold seizure, or call-in, often include historic pre-1933 gold coins in the mix. Both categories carry modest premiums over their gold melt value, track the gold price, and enjoy strong liquidity internationally.
A 20-crown gold coin from Norway. Introduced in 1875, it became part of the Scandinavian Monetary Union, which was based on a gold standard. Norwegian gold reserves included tonnes of this and other coins, backing Norway's paper money. The coin was designed for circulation: "124 Stk. 1 Kil. f. G." means that 124 pieces gave one kilogramme of pure gold.
At the end of the day, if you choose to get your gold exposure by owning mining shares, it might be best to buy a mutual fund that focuses on precious metals companies like the aptly named Midas Fund or an ETF like Van Eck Vectors Gold Miners ETF (NYSEMKT:GDX). Note, however, that mutual funds and ETFs like these usually have broadly diversified portfolios that will result in exposure beyond just gold miners. That's not inherently bad, but it does change the dynamics of the investment a little bit.   
Investing always requires some careful research. Investors in bullion coins need to be aware that physical assets come with ongoing storage costs, whether that is more insurance coverage for home storage or an ongoing rental of secure storage like a safety deposit box. Beyond keeping coins safe, investors need to approach the secondary market with caution as coin dealers may charge higher premiums based on numismatic factors. Shopping around for dealers with the smallest premiums over melt value is a good first step. It is also recommended to stick with the higher weight coins, as the 1 once coins trade at less of a premium over spot prices than smaller, more affordable coins. Of course, if you aren't solely interested in buying near the melt value, then bullion coins are more a collectible investment than a precious metals diversification play. In which case, best of luck - you may well need it.
The Mexican Mint issues the official gold bullion for the nation of Mexico. Backed by the federal government and Banco de Mexico, the nation’s central bank, the Mexican Gold Libertad coin debuted in 1981 and has been available annually since 1991. The coin series includes 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, 1/10 oz, and 1/20 oz options. The Gold Libertads feature the following designs:
Gold mining stocks have their benefits and their drawbacks, and aren't the purest way to own gold. If you choose to take this route, you'll want to pay close attention to a company's mining costs, existing mine portfolio, and expansion opportunities at both existing and new assets. All of these will play a role in determining what an investor is willing to pay for a gold miner's stock (in addition to the spot price of the metal itself, of course).
Specialized Maple Leaf coins are also available. One has a face value of $1 million. Another special issue contains .99999 gold weight, referred to as “Five Nines.” Maples are soft and can show handling marks quite easily. A bimetallic  maple leaf with a bullion finish was released from 1979 through 2005. These coins were packaged in a black leather case and the collection was meant to commemorate the Royal Canadian Mint.
Gold exchange-traded products (ETPs) represent an easy way to gain exposure to the gold price, without the inconvenience of storing physical bars. However exchange-traded gold instruments, even those that hold physical gold for the benefit of the investor, carry risks beyond those inherent in the precious metal itself. For example, the most popular gold ETP (GLD) has been widely criticized, and even compared with mortgage-backed securities, due to features of its complex structure.[46][47][48][49][50]
The Royal Mint of England anchors its gold bullion coins with the British Gold Britannia coins. Introduced in 1987, the Gold Britannia features a reverse design created by artist Philip Nathan. Britannia has previously featured on various British coins, but Nathan’s reverse design introduced for these gold bullion coins brought a new, powerful vision of Britannia to British coinage. The obverse features new images of Queen Elizabeth II updated throughout her reign to accurately reflect her age. You’ll also find the Queen’s Beast Series of gold coins available from the Royal Mint, which include:
×