Sheldon's scale, included in his famous work Penny Whimsy, was originally devised specifically for United States large cents, but it is now applied to all series. The scale runs from 0 to 70, where 0 means that you can tell that it was once a coin while 70 means that it is perfect. 60 is uncirculated, what the general public would consider perfect, with no wear whatsoever. There is a direct mapping from this scale to the older descriptive terms, but they are not always used in the same way.[8][9]
You may remember seeing these large gold bullion bars in movies such as "Three Kings," and the old James Bond movie "Goldfinger." Bars like these make up most of the world's gold bullion owned by governments and central banks. These are the "London good delivery" gold bullion bars of approximately 400 troy ounce size, refined and cast by the various private refiners worldwide, and accepted for 'delivery' into London and other major gold bullion markets.
The Market Vectors Junior Gold Miners ETF debuted in 2009. This ETF has become quite popular among investors seeking to have indirect access to gold assets. Although similar to the Gold Miners, the Junior Gold Miners focuses on smaller companies involved in an ongoing search for new sources of gold. Because these companies are less established, there is more risk involved.
Bars generally carry lower price premiums than gold bullion coins. However larger bars carry an increased risk of forgery due to their less stringent parameters for appearance. While bullion coins can be easily weighed and measured against known values to confirm their veracity, most bars cannot, and gold buyers often have bars re-assayed. Larger bars also have a greater volume in which to create a partial forgery using a tungsten-filled cavity, which may not be revealed by an assay. Tungsten is ideal for this purpose because it is much less expensive than gold, but has the same density (19.3 g/cm³).

Gold certificates are usually for unallocated gold, which means there's no specific gold associated with the certificate even though the company says it has enough gold to back all outstanding certificates. You can buy allocated gold certificates, where the certificates represent specific gold bullion, but the costs are higher. The big problem here is that the certificates are really only as good as the company backing them, sort of like banks before FDIC insurance was created. This is why one of the most desirable options for gold certificates is the Perth Mint, which is backed by the government of Western Australia. That said, if you are going to simply buy a paper representation of gold, you might want to consider exchange-traded funds instead. 


In 2008, despite the financial crisis, some investors continued to hedge against a dollar decline caused by two new factors. One was the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing program, launched in December 2008. In that program, the Fed exchanged credit for bank Treasurys. The Fed simply created the credit out of thin air. Investors were concerned this increase in the money supply would create inflation.

During the Middle Ages gold coins continued to be struck, and these are scarce, too. With the discovery of the New World this all changed. The amount of gold flowing out of the mines was enormous, and the Spanish who controlled much of it, used it to strike one of the most fabled coins of all times: The Gold Doubloon. Pirates killed for it, hurricanes sunk them by the chest full, and captain Ahab nailed one to the mast of the Pequod, to be claimed by the first sailor who spotted Moby Dick.
The Perth Mint produces a bullion coin called the Australian Gold Nugget. It is part of the Gold Nugget series introduced in 1986. From 1986 to 1989, the reverse of the coin depicted a variety of Australian gold nuggets. In 1989, the design started to feature kangaroos, the internationally recognized symbol of Australia. These coins are used as both legal tender and bullion coins.
Bullion coins appeal to investors who are looking for a physical asset that has stood the test of time as a store of value. Coins minted from precious metals have, of course, been used for thousands of years as a store of wealth and a transactional currency. With paper currencies, however, bullion coins have moved firmly into the realm of investment as opposed to being used simply as currency. In times of financial uncertainty, bullion coins tend to perform well as a safe haven. Even in times of economic stability, bullion coins generally keep their value over time.
Counterfeiting is an age-old problem when it comes to investing in precious metals. Because of this, many mints have introduced markers or counterfeit-proof features, like the Mint Mark SI™ feature by Sunshine Minting or the Geiger Bar UV light-stampings. Coins are comparably the safest instrument for investing in silver as government mints produce them, and their legal tender status ensures that the anti-counterfeit measures are as stringent as possible.
Investors who buy gold understand gold's benefits better than other investors. They know that economies are reliant on speculation and gambling, and that this makes things uncertain. When speculation fails and mistakes happen, gold shows its strength. Gold is a universally recognised measure of wealth and does not lose its value even if a fiat currency like the Euro collapses.
We've partnered with The Foundation for Learning and Youth Travel Education (FLYTE), a nonprofit organization that empowers youth living in underserved communities through transformative travel experiences. FLYTE teaches that we are more alike than we realize. By bridging the gap between fear and understanding, FLYTE empowers future generations by connecting them to the world.
This is a big issue: If someone wants another ounce of gold, they have to dig it up. And aside from hiding gold, there's no realistic way to make it disappear. Meanwhile, no one will be making any more of it (as Medieval alchemists proved long ago), leaving technological advances and price increases as the only ways to increase the economically viable reserve of gold. Although it is the balance between supply and demand that results in a price for gold, the physical nature of it is what provides its intrinsic value. By contrast, if the U.S. government wants another dollar, it just prints one.
The list of metal refineries the U.S. Gold Bureau offers products from is staggering. Regardless of what your favorite mint is, you should be able to find multiple different sized gold bars from them on our site; plus our catalog is expanding all the time. Find bars distributed by ITB or International Trade Bullion, a company from the Southwest United States. ITB works hand-in-hand with the U.S. Gold Bureau to provide thoroughly refined metals using modern quality control and advanced refining methods. We also offer bars from a number of international mints such as the Australia's Perth Mint and the Royal Canadian Mint.
The name or series of a bar, round, or coin plays a significant role in the demand for the product. To retain the freedom to invest in or divest out of a particular instrument, as and when the investor wants, it is advisable to stick to famous product names and series like the American Silver Eagles or Canadian Maple Leafs. Hence, at any given time you will be assured of scores of both active buyers and sellers in the market.
Answer. We probably get that question more than any other -- pretty much on a daily basis. The answer, however, is not as straightforward as you might think. What you buy depends upon your goals. We usually answer the "What should I buy?" question with one of our own: "Why are you interested in buying gold?" If your goal is simply to hedge financial uncertainty and/or capitalize on price movement, then contemporary bullion coins will serve your purposes. Those concerned with the possibility of capital controls and a gold seizure, or call-in, often include historic pre-1933 gold coins in the mix. Both categories carry modest premiums over their gold melt value, track the gold price, and enjoy strong liquidity internationally.
The most obvious answer is to run out and buy some gold coins, bars, or jewelry. This isn't the best option for investors. For example, there's a huge markup on jewelry, which makes it a very bad investment choice. But there's also likely to be a markup on coins and bars that gets put into the price quoted from dealers. After all, they have to make a living and be compensated for acting as the intermediary between buyers and sellers.
To buy gold bullion or silver bullion for numismatic value, one needs to have a very good understanding of the collectable market. Often times, values will vary significantly from year to year. Remember, unlike a bullion price, a collectible coin is only worth what it can be sold for. Many buyers have been burned spending lots of money for a “collectable” and then selling it for far less.
Gold futures and options. You can invest in gold through financial derivatives that specialize in gold investments like call and put options. A call is appropriate if you expect the value of gold to increase. On the other hand, you’d purchase a put if you expect the price of gold to drop. Like other derivatives, gold options and futures are risky; you have the potential to earn high returns or incur huge losses.
When looking for an American gold eagle, you'll come across some certified bullion. This means that an organization with a strong professional reputation rated the coin as authentic. Investors look for those certified by the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation or the Professional Coin Grading Service. Both organizations guarantee that the product is authentic and that it contains the right mixture of metals. These organizations also assign a numeric rating to the American Eagles and similar designs based on its value and condition.

The World Gold Council supports the development of gold markets and helps investors understand how investments in gold can help them achieve their investment objectives. We work to expand the options for individual and institutional investors to access the gold market by working with the financial industry to develop and promote new offerings through direct and intermediated channels.


Gold stocks are typically more appealing to growth investors than to income investors. Gold stocks generally rise and fall with the price of gold, but there are well-managed mining companies that are profitable even when the price of gold is down. Increases in the price of gold are often magnified in gold stock prices. A relatively small increase in the price of gold can lead to significant gains in the best gold stocks and owners of gold stocks typically obtain a much higher return on investment (ROI) than owners of physical gold.
Answer. The biggest trap investors fall into is buying a gold investment that bears little or no relationship to his or her objectives. Take safe-haven investors for example. That group makes up 90% of our clientele, and probably a good 75% of the current physical gold market. Most often the safe-haven investor simply wants to add gold coins to his or her portfolio mix, but too often this same investor ends up instead with a leveraged (financed) gold position, or a handful of exotic rare coins, or a position in an ETF that amounts to little more than a bet on the gold price. These have little to do with safe-haven investing, and most investors would be well served to avoid them.
Bullion coins appeal to investors who are looking for a physical asset that has stood the test of time as a store of value. Coins minted from precious metals have, of course, been used for thousands of years as a store of wealth and a transactional currency. With paper currencies, however, bullion coins have moved firmly into the realm of investment as opposed to being used simply as currency. In times of financial uncertainty, bullion coins tend to perform well as a safe haven. Even in times of economic stability, bullion coins generally keep their value over time.

Silver was the first metal used as currency more than 4,000 years ago, when Silver ingots were used in trading. When you purchase Silver, you are buying an asset valued since ancient times. Recognized innately by humans as valuable, Silver has always been a viable investment and commodity. But what makes Silver a good investment now? Why is buying physical Silver a good idea today? Let’s examine what makes buying physical Silver a great investment and collecting opportunity.
Now that you understand why buying Silver is a good use of your investment dollar, you may need guidance regarding how to buy physical Silver. Luckily, buying physical Silver is easy. If you choose an established, well-regarded Precious Metals company, you can buy with confidence. Buying physical Silver should be an enjoyable part of your investment journey. Consider working with APMEX to experience the thrill of buying physical Silver. For example, you may choose a beautiful 1922 Silver Dollar. The 1922 Silver Dollar has bullion value due to its Silver content, as well as collectible value due to its brief minting.
Clearly, there's more to understand about streaming companies, but a short list of benefits includes widely diversified portfolios, contractually built-in low prices that lead to wide margins in good years and bad, and exposure to gold price changes (since streaming companies make money by selling the gold they buy from the miners). That said, none of the major streaming companies has a pure gold portfolio, with silver the most common added exposure. Franco-Nevada Corp., the largest streaming and royalty company, also has exposure to oil and gas drilling. So you'll need to do a little homework here to fully understand what commodity exposures you'll get from your investment. And while streaming companies avoid many of the risks of running a mine, they don't completely sidestep them: If a mine isn't producing any gold, there's nothing for a streaming company to buy.
Answer. The biggest trap investors fall into is buying a gold investment that bears little or no relationship to his or her objectives. Take safe-haven investors for example. That group makes up 90% of our clientele, and probably a good 75% of the current physical gold market. Most often the safe-haven investor simply wants to add gold coins to his or her portfolio mix, but too often this same investor ends up instead with a leveraged (financed) gold position, or a handful of exotic rare coins, or a position in an ETF that amounts to little more than a bet on the gold price. These have little to do with safe-haven investing, and most investors would be well served to avoid them.
The first paper bank notes were gold certificates. They were first issued in the 17th century when they were used by goldsmiths in England and the Netherlands for customers who kept deposits of gold bullion in their vault for safe-keeping. Two centuries later, the gold certificates began being issued in the United States when the US Treasury issued such certificates that could be exchanged for gold. The United States Government first authorized the use of the gold certificates in 1863. On April 5, 1933 the US Government restricted the private gold ownership in the United States and therefore, the gold certificates stopped circulating as money (this restriction was reversed on January 1, 1975). Nowadays, gold certificates are still issued by gold pool programs in Australia and the United States, as well as by banks in Germany, Switzerland and Vietnam.[53]
Canadian Gold Maple Leafs: The Royal Canadian Mint provides a variety of gold coins for sale, starting with the flagship and widely recognized Gold Maple Leaf. Canadian Gold Maple Leafs coins are unique in that they are one of the few sovereign gold coins available in denominations of 1/20 ounce. They are also available in 1-ounce, ½ ounce, ¼ ounce, and 1/10 ounce versions. The Mint also produces a “Call of the Wild” series, with 2017 featuring the Canadian Gold Elk. You’ll find Canadian gold coins in a variety of weights, perfect for both new and seasoned investors. The Canadian Royal Mint’s Maplegrams can be broken off into individual grams and also make excellent gifts for loved ones.
As you look into ETFs, however, a word of warning: Make sure that you fully understand what the ETF is intended to do. The difference between the SPDR Gold Shares ETF and the two gold miner-focused VanEck ETFs is only the tip of the iceberg, as the more subtle difference between the two VanEck ETFs makes very clear. When you do your research, look closely at the index being tracked, paying particular attention to how it is constructed, the weighting approach, and when and how it gets rebalanced. All are important pieces of information that are easy to overlook when you assume that a simple ETF name will translate into a simple investment approach.
Gold bullion is real, honest money...and, many say, the best form of money the world has ever known. It is a store of value and a safe haven in times of crisis. Gold is rare, durable and does not wear out in the manner of lesser metals (or paper!) when passed from hand to hand. A small amount, easily carried, can purchase a significant amount of goods and services. It is universally accepted, and can be easily bought and sold around the world.
Once you've built your gold position, you should strongly consider keeping it a core portion of your portfolio. That, of course, comes with a caveat: If you target a 10% allocation to gold, then once a year or so you'll want to revisit that allocation to make sure it's still roughly where you want it. If gold is having a good year and your position has increased to 12% or more of your portfolio, it's wise to sell some of the position to bring it back to 10%, and put the resulting cash into other investments. Conversely, if your gold position falls to 8% or so, then you may want to add to it to bring it back to your 10% target. This is really just simple portfolio rebalancing, but it's an important maintenance issue that you shouldn't forget about.   

Gold is a timeless investment to protect your wealth. A time capsule from any century is sure to include gold coins or bullion. Discover the security and pride in ownership for yourself. Pool your resources and make an important decision about your financial future. Talk to a knowledgeable professional at Money Metals Exchange by calling 1-800-800-1865 today to learn how to buy gold bullion for greater financial security. We take pride in offering outstanding service, great pricing, and fast delivery times to everyone – from novice buyers to sophisticated investors.
The gold in these gold eagle bullion coins comes from American sources. It is alloyed with copper and silver for durability. Crown gold refers to 22 karat alloy, per the English standard, which has not been used in the U.S. since 1937. American eagles contain a gold fraction of .9167, which is authorized as 22 karats, with 3% silver and 5.33% copper. Un-circulated and proof versions, which are produced at the West Point Mint in New York, are available for coin collectors. The eagles minted from 1986 through 1991 feature the date in Roman numerals. Now Arabic numbers designate the date on these coins.
Queen's Beast Silver Coins: The Royal Mint's Queen's Beast Silver Coin program includes 10 designs with each one representing a different heraldic beast from the history of England's royal monarchs. Each design is available as a .9999 pure silver bullion coins or .999 pure silver proof coin with a 2 oz silver weight in the bullion version or 1 oz, 5 oz, 10 oz, and 1 kilo options in proof.
×