Another factor to take into account when purchasing gold instruments is whether to buy new freshly-minted products or to look for relatively cheaper secondary-market gold goods. Like any other product or commodity, most everyone automatically prefers shiny and new. Moreover, there is a widespread myth among some investors that secondary-market precious metals products have a lower resale value because of their condition and lack of finish. Depending on the sentiment and market condition when the investor is looking to sell, this is not always the case. However, collectors who treasure gold coins for their collectible value will, in most cases, prefer mint condition and near-perfect or perfect graded gold coins.

The best time to invest in gold is when inflation is expected to take hold and force down the value of the national currency. The earlier you can detect such drops, the more room you have to make a profit. Leading indicators such as stock market declines and political turmoil may indicate a future devaluation of your country’s currency. Announcements by reserve banks to print out more local currency can also indicate a good time to invest in gold.

Gold was used in commerce (beside other precious metals) in the Ancient Near East since the Bronze Age, but coins proper originated much later, during the 6th century BC, in Anatolia. The name of king Croesus of Lydia remains associated with the invention (although the Parian Chronicle mentions Pheidon of Argos as a contender). In 546 BC, Croesus was captured by the Persians, who adopted gold as the main metal for their coins. The most valuable of all Persian minted coinage still remains the gold drahms, minted in 1 AD as a gift by the Persian King Vonones Hebrew Bible new testament (Matthew 2.1–23).[1][2] Ancient Greek coinage contained a number of gold coins issued by the various city states.

Another popular means of adding numismatic value to silver bullion coins is the application of a colorized lacquer. This too is typically applied only to the primary design of a coin on one side. For example, Colorized American Silver Eagle Coins feature brilliant hues and the red, white, and blue of the American flag on the image of Walking Liberty. The colorized lacquer does not change the weight of the coin, nor does it impact the silver content in any way. It is simply a means of adding a collectible twist to popular silver bullion coins.
Bullion coins can be bought directly from the government agency or institution that prints the coin, if supplies are available. Most are minted on a limited run, and some run out very quickly. That leaves the secondary market from which to buy gold coins—either coin dealers or private owners. People buy coins for various reasons but the big drivers are investment to profit on changes in precious metal values or for collection. Popular coins include the South African Krugerrand, the Canadian Maple, and the U.S. Gold Eagle coins.
The Austrian Philharmonics made their debut in 1989. These Gold coins depict the famous Great Pipe Organ from one of the most notable concert orchestras in the world. The reverse features a cadre of musical instruments. The Austrian Philharmonic coins are popular with investors all over the world for their high Gold content and unique depictions of the world-renowned orchestra. Multiple sizes are also available for these coins, including a 1/25 oz Gold coin.
Southwest Numismatic Corp. is a PCGS authorized dealer operating by appointment only. Though they have little internet presence, they are known for high-grade coins at reasonable prices. They specialize in rare coins including early U.S. coins, such as copper, small cents, and colonial or territorial issues. Southwest Numismatic also deals in ancient and foreign coins, paper currency, and gold and silver bullion coins.
There are few things as quintessentially British as the personification of Britannia and the heraldic Queen’s Beasts. Available in several sizes, these Gold coins are marvelously designed and appeal to collectors and investors. While the spot Gold prices fluctuate, the popularity of these coins increases. Investors buy and trade British Gold coins for their variety, beauty and quality. 

Buying Gold bars is one of the most cost-effective, safest and easiest ways to own physical Gold. Gold bars generally match sovereign coins in content and purity, but cost less over Gold spot price than Gold coins because they’re usually minted privately. APMEX sells Gold bars produced by Heraeus, Credit Suisse, Valcambi, Perth Mint and other respected Gold companies. Each Gold bar is stamped with its exact Gold weight, fineness and a serial number for added security.
Not all silver products are IRA eligible for inclusion in precious metal retirement accounts. Please look for the ✔IRA APPROVED checkmark on the product page for the product that you are interested in purchasing. If the checkmark is not present on the page, that product is not eligible for inclusion in precious metal retirement accounts. If you have any questions regarding setting up or buying silver for your account please contact our staff at 1-800-294-8732.
Gold is denser than almost all other metals, hence hard to fake. A determination of weight and volume is in many cases sufficient to spot forgeries. A coin that is not gold or below the expected fineness will either have the right size but will a lower than expected weight or it weighs right and will be somewhat larger. Most metals that are of similar or higher density than gold are similarly or more expensive, and were unknown in ancient times (notably the platinum group). During the 19th century platinum was cheaper than gold and was used for counterfeiting gold coins. These coins could be detected by acoustic properties.[14] Only two relatively inexpensive substances are of similar density to gold: depleted uranium and tungsten.[15] Depleted uranium is government-regulated, but tungsten is more commonly available and suited for counterfeiting.[15] Alloying gold with tungsten would not work for several reasons, but tungsten plated with a thin layer of gold is a common type of forgery.
The grading standards are different in different countries. The main standards applied outside the United States are presented in the following table.[11] Coin grading is not an exact science. It is a subjective exercise and depends on the qualification and the experience of the appraiser. Industry leaders were extremely concerned that without a standardized grading system, the rare coin industry could face enormous problems. Therefore, on February 3, 1986, the Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) was formed and in 1987 the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation. Both associations have the same goal of grading coins. Other prominent grading organizations are the American Numismatic Association Certification Service (ANACS) and the Independent Coin Graders. The grading is usually done by three independent appraisers. A grading finalizer assigns the final grade of the coin and thereafter the coin is sonically sealed in a protective, inert plastic holder known as "slab".[7] Other associations followed and are at present active.[12] This third-party appraisal of a coin's physical condition, backed by a guarantee, and a national network of reputable coin dealers provided an extremely reliable form of protection for rare coin consumers who could then participate in the coin market with greater confidence.
British Silver Britannia: The official silver bullion coin of Great Britain, the Britannia coinage debuted in 1997 from the Royal Mint of England. It shares the same obverse and reverse designs as the Gold Britannia. On the obverse is a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II, while the reverse features the design of Britannia from Philip Nathan. From 1997 to 2012, the Silver Britannia featured .958 silver purity, but since 2013 it has featured .999 pure silver content.
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