Buying silver bullion and gold bullion online is a popular way to diversity your investment portfolio. SD Bullion offers numerous silver buying options based on your investing strategy including the American Silver Eagle, Canadian Silver Maple, Austrian Silver Philharmonic, Chinese Silver Pandas, Silver Shield Collection, and 90% Constitutional Coins (Junk Silver). We also offer a wide selection of low price silver rounds such as the popular Republic Metals Silver Buffalo. Whatever your investment strategy, we have a product for you.
Avoid rare coins. Rare coins require more diligence and expertise when buying them, Mladjenovic says. Two coins may look alike but have completely different grades. This difference can add up to thousands of dollars. You should hire a professional grading service and get a certificate of authenticity when buying rare coins — a hassle for most investors.

Cash for gold – With the rise in the value of gold due to the financial crisis of 2007–2010, there has been a surge in companies that will buy personal gold in exchange for cash, or sell investments in gold bullion and coins. Several of these have prolific marketing plans and high value spokesmen, such as prior vice presidents. Many of these companies are under investigation for a variety of securities fraud claims, as well as laundering money for terrorist organizations.[62][63][64][65] Also, given that ownership is often not verified, many companies are considered to be receiving stolen property, and multiple laws are under consideration as methods to curtail this.[66][67]


Gold coins minted pre-1933 come in a range of monetary values. Each of these coin values also has a number of varieties for each denomination, depending on which year it was produced. Gold pieces were coins that were produced in small denominations such as 1-dollar, 3 dollars, and 4 dollars. The eagle was another major variety that comes in four denominations: 20-dollar double eagle, 10-dollar eagle, 5-dollar half eagle, and 2.50-dollar quarter eagle.
As the collector market for coins grew rapidly in the late 19th century and early 20th century, it became apparent that a more precise grading standard was needed. Some coins were simply more fine than others, and some uncirculated coins showed more luster and far fewer marks than others. Terms like "gem uncirculated" and "very fine" began to see use, as more precise grading descriptions allowed for more precise pricing for the booming collector market. In 1948, a well-known numismatist by the name of Dr. William Sheldon attempted to standardized coin grading by proposing what is now known as the Sheldon Scale.
In July 2002, a very rare $20 1933 Double Eagle gold coin sold for a record $7,590,020 at Sotheby's, making it by far the most valuable coin ever sold up to that time (a 1794 Flowing Hair Dollar sold for over $10 million in January 2013). In early 1933, more than 445,000 Double Eagle coins were struck by the U.S. Mint, but most of these were surrendered and melted down following Executive Order 6102. Only a few coins survived.

A. Positively. Most of the strong demand globally since the beginning of 2016, has been driven by the low-to-negative-rate environment. At a time when fixed-yield investments pay little to nothing, gold and silver at least provide some upside potential. In addition, these metals protect against the downside risks implied by the low to non-existent rates of return. Those two very persuasive arguments have translated to strong institutional and fund demand at the ETFs as well as demand among individual investors for physical coins and bullion. A mid-2016 Bankrate survey of investors is telling in this regard. One in six chose gold as the best place to park money they would not need for the next ten years, the same number that chose stocks.


For all these reasons, it's easy to jump to the conclusion that gold is an unsafe investment. Which would be true if the only thing you owned was physical gold or gold-focused mutual funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs). If you use gold as part of a larger, diversified investment plan, however, it is not only safe to own but can provide you with positive returns when the rest of your portfolio is struggling. Here's why gold can be a safe investment, when used the right way.


Generally, the term “bullion”  includes any coin which is readily deliverable and trades based on the daily price of gold. Only a few items need to be reported upon sale, so don’t allow dealers to talk you out of buying bullion coins because of reporting requirements. The newer U.S. coins such as Buffalos and Eagles are specifically defined as numismatic coins in the legislation that created the mandate and they are not reportable by the dealer you sell to. However the IRS requires you to report profits on ANY numismatic or bullion item.
Thus, even though some bars, coins, and rounds usually command lower premiums over spot, silver coins may warrant a much higher premium because of their collectible value. Also, another reason why coins command a higher premium is – they hold the prestige of being the only government-minted precious metals instruments and thus, enjoy a strong demand in the precious metals market.
The average investor prefers to purchase silver coins issued by sovereign mints. These coins are known commodities around the world. Each one features the same weight and metal content with every release year. A central government and/or central bank backs the purity and weight of each, and in most cases issues a nominal face value for the coin even though the value of its silver content outweighs any denominational value. There is great diversity in the silver bullion coin market, with the following coins representing the most popular from mints around the world:
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