As you would have probably figured out by now, all forms of gold bullion products have their purpose in an investment portfolio. Hence, a safe and recommended strategy is to allocate a specific ratio (depending on you or the advice of your investment advisor) of every type of gold bullion instrument in your tangible assets. However, it is an entirely personal decision that one must take after careful deliberation.
The difference between mint bars and cast bars are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to variations in gold bars. The U.S. Gold Bureau carries a plethora of different sized bars, both cast and mint. One of the most important factors people take into account when buying gold is what size to purchase. As stated previously, gold can be found in almost any weight you can imagine. The single gram or 1 gram bar is about about as small as you can go when it comes to gold bars with investment potential. Sometimes referred to as the "small bills" of the gold world, these tiny bars are just about the size of a thumbtack. The 5, 10, and 20 gram bars are the next steps up in terms of gold bar weights.
Gold has been used throughout history as money and has been a relative standard for currency equivalents specific to economic regions or countries, until recent times. Many European countries implemented gold standards in the latter part of the 19th century until these were temporarily suspended in the financial crises involving World War I.[3] After World War II, the Bretton Woods system pegged the United States dollar to gold at a rate of US$35 per troy ounce. The system existed until the 1971 Nixon Shock, when the US unilaterally suspended the direct convertibility of the United States dollar to gold and made the transition to a fiat currency system. The last major currency to be divorced from gold was the Swiss Franc in 2000.[4]
Selling back to Money Metals Exchange is super easy.  You can lock in prices on this website or over the phone. Successful sellers continually watch trends and prices to choose advantageous times to sell. Gold can be sold quickly at local pawn shops, but sellers are likely to take a lower price than what the bullion is actually worth. Jewelry and coin shops buy gold, but many of them do not offer top dollar like Money Metals Exchange does. It can also be sold in real-time online. The prices are locked in immediately, making it a great option. Plus, it is transferred in a safer way than bringing it around town to various shops, depending on where it is stored.

A. Positively. Most of the strong demand globally since the beginning of 2016, has been driven by the low-to-negative-rate environment. At a time when fixed-yield investments pay little to nothing, gold and silver at least provide some upside potential. In addition, these metals protect against the downside risks implied by the low to non-existent rates of return. Those two very persuasive arguments have translated to strong institutional and fund demand at the ETFs as well as demand among individual investors for physical coins and bullion. A mid-2016 Bankrate survey of investors is telling in this regard. One in six chose gold as the best place to park money they would not need for the next ten years, the same number that chose stocks.
Gold coins are produced at a mint by two dies that strike a blank piece of metal with great force. One die as the obverse (front) design for the coin and the other has the reverse (back) design. Proof coins are struck two times or more by the die, while bullion coins are struck once. Gold bullion coins usually have a fineness of .999, which is 24 karats.
There is no precious metal in the world coveted more than gold. The famous “yellow metal” has been a standard by which wealth is measured for centuries, and as civilizations took the first steps out of the Dark Ages and into international trade in the Middle Ages and beyond, gold was there as the standard unit of commerce used by nations and people who spoke different languages. Despite language and cultural barriers, everyone understands the value of gold. Today, gold bullion remains a primary vehicle for private investment and the protection of wealth. The JM Bullion catalog contains a wide array of gold bullion products, some of which you can learn more about below.
Numismatic simply means collectible. Numismatic coins are rare, old or valuable coins that are worth more than just their melt value because they are collector’s items. A gold or silver coin (even platinum and palladium) can be both bullion and numismatic. By their manufactured nature the coins are bullion, but some specific years and types add value on top of the metal spot value of the coin, making them numismatic. Some specific coins can earn substantial premiums above and beyond the metal’s bullion value simply due to the fact that the coin issue is extremely hard to find. Additionally, coins in very good or perfect issue condition will often be worth far more than circulated bullion coins. Finding a protected, rare issue makes a bullion coin unique, which is why collectors will pay a high price to get their hands on it.
While it is next to impossible to buy Silver at spot, reputable retailers such as APMEX make it easy to get the best price available at a competitive premium over spot. The term spot refers to the current market price for a 1 oz unit of Gold, a rate that continually fluctuates during the day. Investors want to pay as close to the current spot price as possible with small premiums giving the best chance at a good margin when selling later. There are, however, other factors that make a higher premium worth paying, such as a history of appreciation, availability, or reputation of quality from the mint of origin. While all Precious Metals including Gold are sold at a premium, this small additional cost is what pays for expenses such as mining, refining, production, and collectible market value.
“ For the first time buying coins off the internet, I am more than pleased. Coins came in the quality promised and in the time frame that was stated with secure delivery. Also the prices and selections are good with excellent service. Since I will be buying again from Golden Eagle and can without resevation recommend it to other individuals. Sincerely, Wayne Schenk ”

Bullion coin counterfeits (of all types) used to be rare and fairly easy to detect when comparing their weights, colors and sizes to authentic pieces. This is because the cost of reproducing any given coin precisely can exceed the market value of the originals.[16][17][18][19] However, since about 2015 counterfeit coins are "flooding the market at an astonishing rate" and "it's gotten to the point where even people who deal with coins all the time may not be able to recognize a counterfeit coin right away" (American Numismatic Association (ANA), 2016).[20] The coins consist mostly of tungsten plated thinly with gold, have the correct weight, correct or near-correct dimensions and are professionally produced in China.[20][21]

The most obvious answer is to run out and buy some gold coins, bars, or jewelry. This isn't the best option for investors. For example, there's a huge markup on jewelry, which makes it a very bad investment choice. But there's also likely to be a markup on coins and bars that gets put into the price quoted from dealers. After all, they have to make a living and be compensated for acting as the intermediary between buyers and sellers.


The Perth Mint shall not be liable to any person for any special, direct, indirect, incidental, punitive or consequential damages of any kind whatsoever (including, but not limited to, legal fees) in any way due to, resulting from or arising out of, or in connection with the use or inability to use the information, details, statistics and figures contained above.

Unallocated gold relates to authorized participants like JPMorgan or Goldman Sachs who trade gold futures. Futures contracts are often bought if the trustee needs to create new shares fast and doesn't have the time to buy and deliver the bullion. Typically allocated gold far outweighs the unallocated gold and the amounts are tallied each day by the custodian. The ETF also has a set amount of time when it must deliver the physical gold into the vault.


Some coins stay in families for generations. Even over decades of time, each recipient realizes the value of their inheritance. Gold coins often serve as collectible investments because of their design, scarcity and demand. With each passing year, new coins are minted in different variations which may never be produced again. APMEX only sells Gold coins minted by the most trusted mints in the world. These mints include the United States Mint, Royal Canadian Mint, Perth Mint, Austrian Mint and more.


Many Canadian Gold coins are struck in .9999 fine Gold, but the Royal Canadian Mint has a special selection of Gold coins struck in .99999 fine Gold. Many of these coins depict the iconic maple leaf, wildlife animals and predators, and stunning natural elements found in Canada. .99999 fine Gold is a worthy investment for any investor because these coins are extremely rare.
Gold bullion coins usually come in 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, 1/10 and 1/20 oz. sizes. Most countries have one design that remains constant each year; others (such as the Chinese Panda coins) have variations each year, and in most cases each coin is dated. A 1/10 oz bullion coin is about the same size as a U.S. dime. A 1 oz. gold bullion coin is about the size of a U.S. half dollar.
Central banks and the International Monetary Fund play an important role in the gold price. At the end of 2004, central banks and official organizations held 19% of all above-ground gold as official gold reserves.[18] The ten-year Washington Agreement on Gold (WAG), which dates from September 1999, limited gold sales by its members (Europe, United States, Japan, Australia, the Bank for International Settlements and the International Monetary Fund) to less than 500 tonnes a year.[19] In 2009, this agreement was extended for a further five years, but with a smaller annual sales limit of 400 tonnes.[20] European central banks, such as the Bank of England and the Swiss National Bank, have been key sellers of gold over this period.[21]

The thing is, gold and stocks don't always do the same thing at the same time. For example, when the stock market is doing well, gold often lags behind. And since the market has a long history of heading higher over time, owning gold as your only investment would clearly be a risky proposition. But the interplay between stocks and gold is where gold's value lies for investors -- and why it can be a safe investment if you use it properly.


The grading standards are different in different countries. The main standards applied outside the United States are presented in the following table.[11] Coin grading is not an exact science. It is a subjective exercise and depends on the qualification and the experience of the appraiser. Industry leaders were extremely concerned that without a standardized grading system, the rare coin industry could face enormous problems. Therefore, on February 3, 1986, the Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) was formed and in 1987 the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation. Both associations have the same goal of grading coins. Other prominent grading organizations are the American Numismatic Association Certification Service (ANACS) and the Independent Coin Graders. The grading is usually done by three independent appraisers. A grading finalizer assigns the final grade of the coin and thereafter the coin is sonically sealed in a protective, inert plastic holder known as "slab".[7] Other associations followed and are at present active.[12] This third-party appraisal of a coin's physical condition, backed by a guarantee, and a national network of reputable coin dealers provided an extremely reliable form of protection for rare coin consumers who could then participate in the coin market with greater confidence.
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Investing always requires some careful research. Investors in bullion coins need to be aware that physical assets come with ongoing storage costs, whether that is more insurance coverage for home storage or an ongoing rental of secure storage like a safety deposit box. Beyond keeping coins safe, investors need to approach the secondary market with caution as coin dealers may charge higher premiums based on numismatic factors. Shopping around for dealers with the smallest premiums over melt value is a good first step. It is also recommended to stick with the higher weight coins, as the 1 once coins trade at less of a premium over spot prices than smaller, more affordable coins. Of course, if you aren't solely interested in buying near the melt value, then bullion coins are more a collectible investment than a precious metals diversification play. In which case, best of luck - you may well need it.
As there is a finite amount of Silver in the world, Silver’s relative purchasing power tends to remain stable. For example, in 1985, the cost of an ounce of Silver would just about buy two movie tickets. Allowing for some peaks and valleys in the market, today, one ounce of Silver costs slightly less than a pair of movie tickets while the price in dollars has tripled. Silver prices do fluctuate, but they generally move independent of the stock market. If you want a stable investment that can protect your purchasing power long term, consider buying Physical Silver.
Answer. Since, for one reason or another, it is difficult to take delivery from any of the ETFs, they are generally viewed as a price bet and not actual ownership of the metal. Most gold investors want possession of their gold because they are buying as a hedge against an economic, financial or political disaster. When disaster strikes, it does not do you much good to have your gold stored in some distant facility by a third party. For this reason, over the past couple of years the trend even with hedge fund operators has been away from the ETFs. In 2011, ETF sales plummeted while purchases of physical coins and bullion for delivery skyrocketed.
The Royal Mint of England anchors its gold bullion coins with the British Gold Britannia coins. Introduced in 1987, the Gold Britannia features a reverse design created by artist Philip Nathan. Britannia has previously featured on various British coins, but Nathan’s reverse design introduced for these gold bullion coins brought a new, powerful vision of Britannia to British coinage. The obverse features new images of Queen Elizabeth II updated throughout her reign to accurately reflect her age. You’ll also find the Queen’s Beast Series of gold coins available from the Royal Mint, which include:

The Austrian Mint is responsible for issuing one of the first great gold bullion coin programs. Debuting in 1989, the Austrian Gold Philharmonic is the nation’s official gold coin and reflects the arts and culture of Austria as represented by the Vienna Philharmonic orchestra. The Gold Philharmonic coins debuted in 1989 with 1 oz and 1/4 oz options, and over time has grown to include 1/10 oz (1991), 1/2 oz (1994), and 1/25 oz (2014) coins. Gold Philharmonic coins had face values in Austrian Schillings from 1989 to 2001, and following the adoption of the European Union common currency in 2002 issued the coins with face values in Euros (€). The Austrian Gold Philharmonic has the following designs:


A. Gold's baseline, essential quality is its role as the only primary asset that is not someone else's liability. That separates gold from the majority of capital assets which in fact do rely on another's ability to pay, like bonds and bank savings, or the performance of the management, or some other delimiting factor, as is the case with stocks. The first chapter of the ABCs of Gold Investing ends with this: "No matter what happens in this country, with the dollar, with the stock and bond markets, the gold owner will find a friend in the yellow metal -- something to rely upon when the chips are down. In gold, investors will find a vehicle to protect their wealth. Gold is bedrock."

The United States Mint is the sovereign mint of the United States of America and the only one authorized to produce American gold coins. Since 1794, the US Mint has issued both circulation gold currency and bullion gold coinage. From 1794 to 1933, the United States issued circulation gold coins in 22-karat gold (1794-1837) and .900 pure gold content (1838-1933). In 1986, the United States reintroduced gold coinage with gold bullion coins for investment and collection. The following are examples of American gold coins for sale:

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