Gold bars can refer to a multitude of different things. Also called ingots or bullion, a gold bar in the most simple terms is gold of certain purity that has been formed into the shape of a rectangular cube. However, there are a lot more terms that can be applied to better describe a gold bar. For instance, if a gold bar is minted, that means it went through a more rigorous creation process. It involves a bank or refinery cutting the gold into set dimensions. In this way, minted gold bars should all be precise in regards to dimensions and purity. A cast bar is easier to make. It merely involves pouring the melted gold into a mold and then letting it form and harden into a bar form. Since these bars aren't cut to specific dimensions, cast bars may be unevenly shaped and vary slightly in appearance from bar to bar. It's often common for cast bars to be handled differently than minted bars. A mint bar will frequently be sealed in a protective packaging whereas a cast bar is more likely to be handled directly.
Gold bars can refer to a multitude of different things. Also called ingots or bullion, a gold bar in the most simple terms is gold of certain purity that has been formed into the shape of a rectangular cube. However, there are a lot more terms that can be applied to better describe a gold bar. For instance, if a gold bar is minted, that means it went through a more rigorous creation process. It involves a bank or refinery cutting the gold into set dimensions. In this way, minted gold bars should all be precise in regards to dimensions and purity. A cast bar is easier to make. It merely involves pouring the melted gold into a mold and then letting it form and harden into a bar form. Since these bars aren't cut to specific dimensions, cast bars may be unevenly shaped and vary slightly in appearance from bar to bar. It's often common for cast bars to be handled differently than minted bars. A mint bar will frequently be sealed in a protective packaging whereas a cast bar is more likely to be handled directly.
Selling back to Money Metals Exchange is super easy.  You can lock in prices on this website or over the phone. Successful sellers continually watch trends and prices to choose advantageous times to sell. Gold can be sold quickly at local pawn shops, but sellers are likely to take a lower price than what the bullion is actually worth. Jewelry and coin shops buy gold, but many of them do not offer top dollar like Money Metals Exchange does. It can also be sold in real-time online. The prices are locked in immediately, making it a great option. Plus, it is transferred in a safer way than bringing it around town to various shops, depending on where it is stored.
Gold was used in commerce (beside other precious metals) in the Ancient Near East since the Bronze Age, but coins proper originated much later, during the 6th century BC, in Anatolia. The name of king Croesus of Lydia remains associated with the invention (although the Parian Chronicle mentions Pheidon of Argos as a contender). In 546 BC, Croesus was captured by the Persians, who adopted gold as the main metal for their coins. The most valuable of all Persian minted coinage still remains the gold drahms, minted in 1 AD as a gift by the Persian King Vonones Hebrew Bible new testament (Matthew 2.1–23).[1][2] Ancient Greek coinage contained a number of gold coins issued by the various city states.
Some Silver coins stay in families for generations, serving as both a bullion investment and collectible. Silver coins realize collectibility because of their design, scarcity and demand. Each year, new coins are minted in different variations which may never be produced again. APMEX only sells Silver coins minted by the most trusted mints in the world. These mints include the United States Mint, Royal Canadian Mint, Perth Mint, Austrian Mint and more.
Physical Gold adds security to your investment portfolio. As there is a finite amount of Gold in the world, Gold’s relative purchasing power tends to remain stable during periods of inflation. For example, in 1985, the cost of an ounce of Gold was about the cost of a nice men’s suit. Allowing for some peaks and valleys in the market, today, one ounce of Gold still costs about the same as a nice men’s suit, even though the price in dollars has nearly quadrupled. Gold prices do fluctuate, but they generally move independent of the stock market. For a stable investment independent of stocks and bonds that can protect your purchasing power long term, buy physical Gold.
A. Once again the answer is not cut and dry, but a general rule of thumb is 10% to 30%. How high you go between 10% and 30% depends upon how concerned you are about the current economic, financial and political situation. James Rickards, strategic investment analyst and author of the New York Times bestseller, Currency Wars: The Making of the Next Global Crisis, advocates a 20% gold diversification. "Gold," explains Rickards, "is not a commodity. Gold is not an investment. Gold is money par excellence."
Compare dealer prices. Aside from the proof version, the U.S. Mint doesn’t sell American Eagle gold coins directly. But there is a dealer location tool on the Mint’s website. Comparing prices among dealers is easy, too, because coins sell at a premium above gold’s spot price, or its delivery price as a commodity. You can find the spot price on precious metals exchange sites such as Monex.com or Kitco.com.
The Krugerrand gold coin was first minted in South Africa in 1967 and was produced by the South African Mint. By 1980, this gold coin accounted for 90 percent of the global coin market. Kruger is the man featured on the obverse and rand refers to the South African unit of currency. Production levels of the Krugerrand have varied over the past half century. They went down in the years associated with the apartheid government and are increasing again.
One of the most affordable ways to get gold is the Lady Liberty round, made of .9999 pure (24 karats) gold in one-tenth troy ounce. They are not legal tender and the goal is to provide the buyer with more gold for the money versus fractional coin bullion. Lady Liberty is featured on the obverse with the image of a descending bald eagle on the reverse.

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