For people who want to ‘play the market,’ i.e. buy and sell regularly to earn immediate profits on every transaction, it is essential to invest in products that can be moved quickly. Although the strategy (buy low and sell high) is simple, investors who want to take this route need to have complete knowledge regarding silver bullion products and the precious metals market, as well as an appetite for risk. Smaller portable investment vehicles such as silver coins and rounds are usually preferred by these types of investors.
American Eagles and similar gold coins are collectible because of the precious metals used in the construction. Precious metal content, also called PMC, is a term that tells you the amount found in each coin. These designs can contain a precious metals content of up to one ounce per coin. This amount can include 0.1, 0.25, or 0.5 ounces too. Collectors often prefer designs with more precious metals. These bullion coins have a weight based on troy ounce, which is a measurement that's a little over 31 grams. Even an American Gold Eagle made primarily from gold often contains trace amounts of other metals like silver.
In 2007 the Royal Canadian Mint produced a 100 kilograms (220 lb) gold coin with a face value of $1,000,000, though the gold content was worth over $2 million at the time. It measures 50 centimetres (20 in) in diameter and is 3 centimetres (1.2 in) thick. It was intended as a one-off to promote a new line of Canadian Gold Maple Leaf coins, but after several interested buyers came forward the mint announced it would manufacture them as ordered and sell them for between $2.5 million and $3 million. As of May 3, 2007, there were five orders.[3] One of these coins has been stolen when it was on exhibition at the Bode Museum in Berlin.[4]

The idea that gold preserves wealth is even more important in an economic environment where investors are faced with a declining U.S. dollar and rising inflation. Historically, gold has served as a hedge against both of these scenarios. With rising inflation, gold typically appreciates. When investors realize that their money is losing value, they will start positioning their investments in a hard asset that has traditionally maintained its value. The 1970s present a prime example of rising gold prices in the midst of rising inflation.
Each year the Royal Canadian Mint produces the Canadian Gold Maple Leaf bullion coin that is issued by the Government of the Dominion of Canada. The standard gold Royal Canadian Mint coins weighs one troy ounce with a face value of $50 Canadian dollars. It is one of the purest gold coins in the world at .99999 millesimal fineness. Other sizes frequently sold inMaple Leaf Coins to investors include 1 gram, 1/25 oz, 1/20 oz, 1/10 oz and ½ oz. The obverse features a profile of Queen Elizabeth II of Canada with the Canadian Maple Leaf on the reverse. Security features were introduced in 2013 and 2015 that are only visible under magnification.
These particular buyers are looking to create a hefty fund to hedge inflation. When seeking to establish a substantial fund, bars become an extremely attractive option, as they are the easiest to stack and store. They come in weights as high as 32.15 troy ounces, making storage relatively easier when compared to other instruments such as rounds and coins. However, providing adequate safety and security to this massive quantity of gold can be a tedious task. Hence, investors are increasingly attracted towards offshore gold storage facilities, advertising top-of-the-line security and peace of mind.
Of all the precious metals, gold is the most popular as an investment.[1] Investors generally buy gold as a way of diversifying risk, especially through the use of futures contracts and derivatives. The gold market is subject to speculation and volatility as are other markets. Compared to other precious metals used for investment, gold has the most effective safe haven and hedging properties across a number of countries.[2]
Since 1919 the most common benchmark for the price of gold has been the London gold fixing, a twice-daily telephone meeting of representatives from five bullion-trading firms of the London bullion market. Furthermore, gold is traded continuously throughout the world based on the intra-day spot price, derived from over-the-counter gold-trading markets around the world (code "XAU"). The following table sets out the gold price versus various assets and key statistics at five-year intervals.[5]

Gold coins are an investment that preserve wealth, a hedge against inflation, and a safe haven during times of global uncertainty. Buying gold coins is a great way to purchase physical precious metals as opposed to non-physical gold ownership, such as gold exchange-traded funds (ETFs), gold exchange-traded notes (ETNs), futures contracts, and mining stocks. Precious metals, such as silver, gold, and platinum can also be purchased as bars and rounds. Gold coins can be stored in safety deposit boxes or in a secure place in your home. As a value investor, you should try to purchase gold coins as close the spot price as you can. Smaller gold coins, such as 1/10 oz, will have a higher premium -- but they may be easier to carry and use in a crisis, particularly given their smaller increment of value.
Answer. We probably get that question more than any other -- pretty much on a daily basis. The answer, however, is not as straightforward as you might think. What you buy depends upon your goals. We usually answer the "What should I buy?" question with one of our own: "Why are you interested in buying gold?" If your goal is simply to hedge financial uncertainty and/or capitalize on price movement, then contemporary bullion coins will serve your purposes. Those concerned with the possibility of capital controls and a gold seizure, or call-in, often include historic pre-1933 gold coins in the mix. Both categories carry modest premiums over their gold melt value, track the gold price, and enjoy strong liquidity internationally.

Gold coins minted pre-1933 come in a range of monetary values. Each of these coin values also has a number of varieties for each denomination, depending on which year it was produced. Gold pieces were coins that were produced in small denominations such as 1-dollar, 3 dollars, and 4 dollars. The eagle was another major variety that comes in four denominations: 20-dollar double eagle, 10-dollar eagle, 5-dollar half eagle, and 2.50-dollar quarter eagle.

A. The same vetting rules outlined earlier apply. Check them out. Too often investors make the mistake of believing that the gold firm that sponsors their favorite political commentator is also the best place to make their gold purchases. National media campaigns are expensive and those costs are usually covered in the prices paid by investors for their gold and silver coins. In some instances that mark-up can be twice the underlying metal value. Take care that you are not paying too much for your gold and that you are buying the gold items best suited to meeting your goals.
A bullion coin is an investment-grade coin that is valued by its weight and fineness of a specific precious metal. Unlike commemorative or numismatic coins valued by limited mintage, rarity, condition, and age, bullion coins are purchased by investors seeking a simple and tangible means to own and invest in the gold, silver, platinum, and palladium markets.
×