Both physical gold bullion and physical silver bullion offer a way to diversity your assets from the traditional paper monetary financial system. Precious metals are an alternative investment with real, inherent value. It is a hard asset, finite, and can't be printed or reproduced. There is a limited amount able to be mined. It has stood the test of time and gold bullion has been traded in various methods for hundreds of years. The gold products we offer are almost entirely investment grade purity.  Investment grade gold is defined as having a purity of .995 or greater and thus our gold coins are mostly dependent on the gold spot price derived from the financial markets.  SD Bullion offers a full line of gold coins and bars to meet your investment needs. Our most popular gold bullion products include American Gold Eagles, Gold Buffalos, Canadian Gold Maples, Gold Krugerrand, Austrian Gold Philharmonic, Chinese Gold Pandas, and US Gold. SD Bullion also carries gold bars in varying sizes including generic 1 oz gold bars and kilo gold bars.
The Austrian Philharmonics made their debut in 1989. These Gold coins depict the famous Great Pipe Organ from one of the most notable concert orchestras in the world. The reverse features a cadre of musical instruments. The Austrian Philharmonic coins are popular with investors all over the world for their high Gold content and unique depictions of the world-renowned orchestra. Multiple sizes are also available for these coins, including a 1/25 oz Gold coin.

Michael Kosares has nearly 40 years experience in the gold business and is the founder of USAGOLD. He is the author of The ABCs of Gold Investing: How to Protect and Build Your Wealth With Gold as well as numerous magazine and internet articles. He is frequently interviewed in the financial press. He is well-known for his ongoing commentary on the gold market and its economic, political and financial underpinnings.
Answer. Since, for one reason or another, it is difficult to take delivery from any of the ETFs, they are generally viewed as a price bet and not actual ownership of the metal. Most gold investors want possession of their gold because they are buying as a hedge against an economic, financial or political disaster. When disaster strikes, it does not do you much good to have your gold stored in some distant facility by a third party. For this reason, over the past couple of years the trend even with hedge fund operators has been away from the ETFs. In 2011, ETF sales plummeted while purchases of physical coins and bullion for delivery skyrocketed.
If you are interested in becoming a silver investor, there are a couple of good reasons why buying silver coins might be a great option to consider. For example, silver coins are real money. They aren't paper or digital currency that has nothing to back them. It's a hard currency that has historically been valued for providing a form of money that can be used for all types of products and trade. Additionally, this type of money offers a tangible asset that is often preferred over paper or digital forms of money.

Bullion Coins offer investors the intrinsic value of the gold, along with the numismatic value of the actual coins. Coins are produced in world renowned mints such as the US Mint, Royal Canadian Mint, or the People's Republic of China and come in limited mintages, therefore increasing their value. They are also recognized as legal tender, wherein gold bars are not. Bullion coins usually come with a higher premium because they are considered legal tender and they are produced in respected Mints. Depending on where they were minted, some coins come in fractional sizes, along with the typical and most popular, one ounce increment. Gold bullion coins provide investors and collectors a product with value that will always be recognized all over the world.
Another factor to take into account when purchasing silver instruments is whether to buy new, freshly-minted products or to look for relatively cheaper secondary-market silver goods. Like any other product or commodity, everyone automatically prefers shiny and new over "second hand." Moreover, there is a widespread myth among some investors that secondary-market precious metals products have a lower resale value because of their condition and lack of finish. Nonetheless, in reality, brand-new silver bars and rounds in perfect condition sell at the same rates (considering equal silver weight and purity) as their secondary market counterparts do. However, collectors who treasure silver coins for their collectible value will, in most cases, prefer mint condition and near-perfect condition coins.
Though most bars, coins, and rounds manufactured across the world, be it in Austria, USA, or China, contain 99.9% pure gold, a few mints like the Royal Canadian Mint surpass the typical purity levels by using 99.99% pure gold in their products. Even though a 0.09% purity increase might not seem like a lot, it vaults the gold products into an elite category of products.
Broadly speaking, one may purchase three kinds of physical silver bullion: silver bars, silver coins, and silver rounds. Although junk silver is another popular method of obtaining silver at lower prices (close to the melt value of silver); the purity of silver in these products makes comparing junk silver to other instruments like comparing apples and oranges.
It is generally accepted that the price of gold is closely related to interest rates. As interest rates rise, the general tendency is for the gold price, which earns no interest, to fall, and vice versa. As a result, the gold price can be closely correlated to central banks[clarification needed] via their monetary policy decisions on interest rates. For example, if market signals indicate the possibility of prolonged inflation, central banks may decide to raise interest rates, which could reduce the price of gold. But this does not always happen: after the European Central Bank raised its interest rate slightly on April 7, 2011, for the first time since 2008,[25] the price of gold drove higher, and hit a new high one day later.[26] Similarly, in August 2011 when interest rates in India were at their highest in two years, the gold prices peaked as well.[27]
Gold coins offer a unique investment opportunity as you are not only investing in the metal itself, but also the scarcity or rarity of the coin. Many collectors will use mintage as a guide when choosing gold coins to collect. Most larger countries are modern producers of gold coins with many countries who have been producing them for centuries. The use of gold coins dates back to ancient times and coin collecting has been appropriately named the "hobby of kings". Today's popular gold coins include the US American Gold Eagle, The Canadian Gold Maple Leaf, The Gold Chinese Panda and many others. Golden Eagle stocks an enormous inventory of gold coins from the modern bullion issues all the way back to ancient coins.
Reverse designs in the Queen’s Beast Series include 10 different heraldic beasts in all. Launched in 2016 with the Lion of England, other designs include the Red Dragon of Wales, Black Bull of Clarence, and the Unicorn of Scotland. The obverse of each coin features Queen Elizabeth II’s effigy, with all reverse and obverse designs from Jody Clark of the Royal Mint.
For people who want to ‘play the market,’ i.e. buy and sell regularly to earn immediate profits on every transaction, it is essential to invest in products that can be moved quickly. Even though this is a well-known strategy, timing the market is harder than it seems. For investors who want to buy and sell at a moment’s notice, portability plays an important role in their product choices. However, a healthy risk appetite is required for playing the market. These investors mostly prefer smaller, more portable gold investment vehicles such as coins and rounds.

This is a big issue: If someone wants another ounce of gold, they have to dig it up. And aside from hiding gold, there's no realistic way to make it disappear. Meanwhile, no one will be making any more of it (as Medieval alchemists proved long ago), leaving technological advances and price increases as the only ways to increase the economically viable reserve of gold. Although it is the balance between supply and demand that results in a price for gold, the physical nature of it is what provides its intrinsic value. By contrast, if the U.S. government wants another dollar, it just prints one.
The gold in these gold eagle bullion coins comes from American sources. It is alloyed with copper and silver for durability. Crown gold refers to 22 karat alloy, per the English standard, which has not been used in the U.S. since 1937. American eagles contain a gold fraction of .9167, which is authorized as 22 karats, with 3% silver and 5.33% copper. Un-circulated and proof versions, which are produced at the West Point Mint in New York, are available for coin collectors. The eagles minted from 1986 through 1991 feature the date in Roman numerals. Now Arabic numbers designate the date on these coins.
Gold should not be bought alone as an investment. Gold itself is speculative, and can have high peaks and low valleys. That makes it too risky for the average individual investor. Over the long run, the value of gold doesn't beat inflation. But gold is an integral part of a diversified portfolio. It should include other commodities such as oil, mining, and investments in other hard assets.

If you’re investing in gold, remember that it’s a commodity, and it’s up to you to make sure you’re not overpaying. The day you buy, check the spot price of gold (available at many Web sites, such as www.goldprice.org). Don’t pay more than a 5% to 8% markup over the spot price -- that’s the typical premium, according to Michael White, spokesman for the U.S. Mint.

When looking for an American gold eagle, you'll come across some certified bullion. This means that an organization with a strong professional reputation rated the coin as authentic. Investors look for those certified by the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation or the Professional Coin Grading Service. Both organizations guarantee that the product is authentic and that it contains the right mixture of metals. These organizations also assign a numeric rating to the American Eagles and similar designs based on its value and condition.
Broadly speaking, physical gold can be purchased in the following forms: gold bars, gold coins, and gold rounds. However, unlike silver, gold isn’t available in ‘junk’ form as the United States confiscated all gold currency in the 1930s. Hence, not only are older gold coins relatively rare, they also command higher premiums – making them a poor investment choice for those looking to build a precious metals portfolio.
As the Vanguard fund's name implies, however, in a fund's portfolio you are likely to find exposure to miners that deal with other precious, semiprecious, and base metals. That's not materially different than owning mining stocks directly, but you should keep this factor in mind, because not all fund names make this clear. The name of the Fidelity fund, for example, might make you believe that it invests only in companies that mine gold, which isn't the case.
Gold maintains a special position in the market with many tax regimes. For example, in the European Union the trading of recognised gold coins and bullion products are free of VAT. Silver and other precious metals or commodities do not have the same allowance. Other taxes such as capital gains tax may also apply for individuals depending on their tax residency. U.S. citizens may be taxed on their gold profits at collectibles or capital gains rates, depending on the investment vehicle used.[61]
The gold that miners dig up goes into a number of different industries today. The largest by far is jewelry, which accounts for around 50% of gold demand. Another 40% comes from direct physical investment in gold, including gold used to create coins, bullion, medals, and gold bars. This broad demand category includes individuals, central banks, and, more recently, exchange-traded funds that purchase gold on behalf of others. The remaining demand for gold comes from industry, for use in things such as dentistry, heat shields, and tech gadgets. 

A bullion coin is an investment-grade coin that is valued by its weight and fineness of a specific precious metal. Unlike commemorative or numismatic coins valued by limited mintage, rarity, condition, and age, bullion coins are purchased by investors seeking a simple and tangible means to own and invest in the gold, silver, platinum, and palladium markets.
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