Though this interview will help you start safely on the road to gold ownership, it is just an overview. If you would like more detailed information, I would recommend my book, The ABCs of Gold Investing: How to Protect and Build Your Wealth With Gold which covers the who, what, when, where, why and how of gold ownership in detail. You can also shortcut the learning curve by contacting our offices and asking to speak with one of our expert client advisors who will be happy to answer your questions and help you get off to a solid start.

(Reader note: The Better Business Bureau began its Gold Star Certificate program in 2003 and USAGOLD was a recipient of the award every year it has been issued – fifteen straight years without a complaint. The firm has been a member of the Bureau since 1986 and accredited every year since 1991 (the year it began its accreditation program) with an A+ rating. To see USAGOLD's full BBB report, please visit this link. Be sure to read our reviews.)
Many coin and small bar dealers offer 'free' shipping when you buy online, but in reality that cost has been shifted into the price you pay for the coin or bar, along with the cost of its manufacture and the dealer's profit margin. In total, it is not unusual for all of these costs to result in you paying 5-8% over the actual wholesale price of the gold you buy.
Gold has been used as a form of money for thousands of years. Because of gold's luster, rarity, and its uncommon density (no other precious metal outside the platinum group is as heavy); it became the medium for trading. Gold also inspired the concept of money: compact, confidential, and changeless. Throughout the thousands of years that have passed, gold has only become more favored over other means of currency.
Now that you understand why buying Silver is a good use of your investment dollar, you may need guidance regarding how to buy physical Silver. Luckily, buying physical Silver is easy. If you choose an established, well-regarded Precious Metals company, you can buy with confidence. Buying physical Silver should be an enjoyable part of your investment journey. Consider working with APMEX to experience the thrill of buying physical Silver. For example, you may choose a beautiful 1922 Silver Dollar. The 1922 Silver Dollar has bullion value due to its Silver content, as well as collectible value due to its brief minting.
Gold is an element categorized in the metal group; its chemical symbol is Au. It's incredibly soft and malleable. In fact, a single ounce of gold can be beaten into a thin metal sheet as big as 5 square meters. The thickness of such a sheet, which is called gold leaf, would be less than the thickness of a human hair. Gold's malleability is one of the key reasons it's used to make jewelry. It's so soft that it needs to be mixed with other metals to increase its strength so it can stand up to daily use. Gold is also a good conductor, a trait that has been important in more recent human history following the harnessing of electricity. 

Answer. Futures contracts are generally considered one of the most speculative arenas in the investment marketplace. The investor's exposure to the market is leveraged and the moves both up and down are greatly exaggerated. Something like 9 out of 10 investors who enter the futures market come away losers. For someone looking to hedge his or her portfolio against economic and financial risk, this is a poor substitute for owning the metal itself.
Founded in 1980, Walnut Gold & Silver buys and sells coins, jewelry, and scrap gold. They offer free appraisals, whether you are selling a single coin or a collection. Their ever-changing stock means there’s always something new to see in their downtown Dallas showroom. Said to be the area’s oldest coin and bullion dealer, Walnut specializes in rare U.S. coins, pre-1964 U.S. silver coinage, proof sets, and gold and silver bullion coins.
The next best thing to owning physical gold is buying an investment that counts physical gold as its primary asset. The easiest examples of this are ETFs like aforementioned SPDR Gold Shares. This particular ETF has an expense ratio of 0.40% and tracks gold prices pretty closely over time. It's probably the next best thing to physically owning gold, but unlike physical gold it can be easily traded.
APMEX: (OK) 405-595-2100 and press 1 unless you want to be on hold forever. For purchases of one to 19 coins there is a 5% markup; for 20 to 99 coins it’s 4.8%; for 100 or more it’s 4%. You must open a free online account. You’ll pay $25 shipping for orders under $25,000; shipping is free if you buy more. Payment by check or wire transfer is preferred.
American Gold Eagle: The American Gold Eagle coin is the official gold bullion coin from the United States, and the coins debuted in 1986. Each Gold Eagle features 22-karat gold for both bullion, proof, and burnished coins. The bullion and proof coins include 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, and 1/10 oz coins, while the burnished coin has just a 1 oz option. All coins feature Lady Liberty from Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ 1907 design on the obverse, with Miley Busiek’s family of bald eagles on the reverse.
Stockpiling gold has been a favorite investment of the wealthy through much of history, and gold remains the most popular investment of all the precious metals. Gold is fungible, portable, and accorded value everywhere in the world. This article outlines four ways to invest in gold. The most suitable method for you depends on the amount of money you have to invest, your investment objectives, the amount of risk you can absorb, and the length of time you intend to hold on to your gold.
Pricing for precious metal numismatic products (e.g., palladium, platinum, 24-k gold, 22-k gold) varies by the average cost of the underlying metal. We use our pricing range table the week prior to sale in order to determine the product's price. If the average weekly price of the precious metal moves up or down into another cost range, the price of the product will also go up or down, respectively, by a fixed amount. You’ll find detailed pricing instructions here. If you need the Adobe reader, you can get it from Adobe.

Investing in gold coins from exotic, unknown mints can be a risky choice. Grading, purity, and other factors determine the value of gold coins – but investors must take great care when sinking money into the illiquid and opaque collectible market. Coins that are supposedly worth way more than their actual melt value should be avoided by everyone but experienced collectors.


Civilizations have equated pure gold with gods, wealth, and immortality. For centuries, gold bullion has symbolized power and used as a storage of wealth. The fact that gold neither corrodes nor tarnishes not to mention the beauty of the precious metal made it suitable for deities and royalty in ancient civilizations. A gold standard was used as a monetary policy within and between nations but the world gold standard ended in 1976. The 1930’s was the last time gold was used in minted coins designated for circulation. Historically, the value of gold was based on perceived rarity and its distinctive color.
Many investors wanted to profit from these tremendous increases in the price of gold. They bought it as a direct investment to take advantage of future price increase. Others continue to buy gold because they see it as a finite valuable substance with many industrial uses. Last but not least, gold is held by many governments and wealthy individuals.
As alluded to above, investors often make the mistake of buying so-called rare coins. These numismatic or semi-numismatic coins are meant for collectors, speculators, and hobbyists rather than people looking to reliably preserve and build wealth. Rare coin buying is exceedingly risky and often buyers pay inordinately high premiums and do not recoup their value. Rare coins are not really a gold investment… they are more akin to artwork. Some collectors buy coins for pleasure, because of their history or beauty, or because they have excess money to tie up in illiquid assets. Gold coins that are priced close to their actual melt value is a more prudent way to invest in precious metals.
Good question. There are thousands of dealers in the country, but there is no federal regulation and little state regulation. The U.S. Mint has a list of national dealers and dealers by state that it checks but doesn’t vouch for. White says that the Mint checks those dealers against the Better Business Bureau list for complaints, as well as online to see whether there is “any negative information about the firm and to get a feel for how the company conducts and promotes itself.”

Answer. We probably get that question more than any other -- pretty much on a daily basis. The answer, however, is not as straightforward as you might think. What you buy depends upon your goals. We usually answer the "What should I buy?" question with one of our own: "Why are you interested in buying gold?" If your goal is simply to hedge financial uncertainty and/or capitalize on price movement, then contemporary bullion coins will serve your purposes. Those concerned with the possibility of capital controls and a gold seizure, or call-in, often include historic pre-1933 gold coins in their planning. Both the contemporary bullion coins and historic gold coins carry modest premiums over their gold melt value, track the gold price, and enjoy strong liquidity internationally.
America the Beautiful Silver Coins: Offered by the United States Mint, the America the Beautiful collection debuted in 2010. It includes a total of 56 designs to represent each of the 50 US states, five overseas territories of the US, and the federal district of Washington DC. Five new designs are issued each year and discontinued once each release year is complete. The coins contain 5 Troy oz of .999 pure silver.
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