Once you have collected a number of silver and gold coins, it is important to know how to store them properly. Generally speaking, silver and gold pieces need to be handled with gloves to protect the surface from oils on your skin. Slabbing gold and silver coins in hard, non-PVC plastics is the safest way to preserve rare pieces of your collection. As an added layer of protection, store your most valuable Liberty pieces in a lock box to prevent damage and theft. This can be a safe, a locking storage area, or even a safety deposit box.

Of all the precious metals, gold is the most popular as an investment.[1] Investors generally buy gold as a way of diversifying risk, especially through the use of futures contracts and derivatives. The gold market is subject to speculation and volatility as are other markets. Compared to other precious metals used for investment, gold has the most effective safe haven and hedging properties across a number of countries.[2]
People with limited capital to invest in precious metals may not divest as much as they would desire into gold bullion. Hence, such buyers should stick to cheaper low-risk gold bullion products with lower premiums over spot, offering them solid appreciation over time – granting them with inflation-proof, financial protection. This is the best way to hedge against inflation and is recommended by financial advisors as a good method of balancing portfolios.
A. A solid, professional gold firm can go a long way in helping the investor shortcut the learning curve. A good gold firm can help you avoid some the problems and pitfalls encountered along the way, and provide some direction. It can help you in the beginning and through the course of your gold ownership both in making additions to your portfolio and liquidations.

Some of the most successful individuals and financial firms around the globe invest in gold. For centuries, it has been one of the most valued commodities. It provides value and benefits to savers and investors. The price of gold in all currencies has been rising dramatically over the last two decades. Because it is not correlated to many other assets – and because it is the ultimate form of money – it makes sense to diversify by holding at least 10 to 15 percent of your assets in precious metals. It is a viable hedge against inflation and often grows in value during tough economic periods. Because it is priced in volatile and unstable paper currencies, it appears to be a significant risk. However, its long-term trend is most definitely up when compared to all currencies!
Since 1919 the most common benchmark for the price of gold has been the London gold fixing, a twice-daily telephone meeting of representatives from five bullion-trading firms of the London bullion market. Furthermore, gold is traded continuously throughout the world based on the intra-day spot price, derived from over-the-counter gold-trading markets around the world (code "XAU"). The following table sets out the gold price versus various assets and key statistics at five-year intervals.[5]
Although central banks do not generally announce gold purchases in advance, some, such as Russia, have expressed interest in growing their gold reserves again as of late 2005.[22] In early 2006, China, which only holds 1.3% of its reserves in gold,[23] announced that it was looking for ways to improve the returns on its official reserves. Some bulls hope that this signals that China might reposition more of its holdings into gold, in line with other central banks. Chinese investors began pursuing investment in gold as an alternative to investment in the Euro after the beginning of the Eurozone crisis in 2011. China has since become the world’s top gold consumer as of 2013.[24]
Bullion coins are coins made from precious metals with a defined weight and content that are generally used for investment purposes. Bullion itself is the term for bulk precious metal that is cast as bars with a specified weight. Bullion coins are basically a smaller, more affordable version of bullion. Bullion are typically minted in weights that are fractions of one troy ounce to fit a variety of budgets. Bullion coins are usually made from gold and silver, but they are also be available in platinum and palladium. Many countries have their own official bullion coins, such as the American Eagle series of coins available from the United States Mint, and the Canadian Maple Leaf series offered by the Royal Canadian Mint.
A. Gold's baseline, essential quality is its role as the only primary asset that is not someone else's liability. That separates gold from the majority of capital assets which in fact do rely on another's ability to pay, like bonds and bank savings, or the performance of the management, or some other delimiting factor, as is the case with stocks. The first chapter of the ABCs of Gold Investing ends with this: "No matter what happens in this country, with the dollar, with the stock and bond markets, the gold owner will find a friend in the yellow metal -- something to rely upon when the chips are down. In gold, investors will find a vehicle to protect their wealth. Gold is bedrock."
The average investor prefers to purchase silver coins issued by sovereign mints. These coins are known commodities around the world. Each one features the same weight and metal content with every release year. A central government and/or central bank backs the purity and weight of each, and in most cases issues a nominal face value for the coin even though the value of its silver content outweighs any denominational value. There is great diversity in the silver bullion coin market, with the following coins representing the most popular from mints around the world:
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