When you buy a futures contract for a fraction of the actual cost of the assets involved, you are basically betting on a small change in the price of the assets. You can make a lot of money buying gold futures if the value of gold goes up relative to your currency, but if it goes down, you can lose everything you invested and possibly more (if your futures contracts do not simply get sold to someone else when you do not have enough money down). This is a way to hedge a risk or speculate but not in itself a way to build savings.
Gold mining stocks have their benefits and their drawbacks, and aren't the purest way to own gold. If you choose to take this route, you'll want to pay close attention to a company's mining costs, existing mine portfolio, and expansion opportunities at both existing and new assets. All of these will play a role in determining what an investor is willing to pay for a gold miner's stock (in addition to the spot price of the metal itself, of course).

Many people choose to invest in a variety of precious gems and metals; this type of investing often includes silver coins. These coins can be an excellent opportunity for collectors, since there is a diverse selection available to anyone interested in collecting these coins. With this selection, you’ll be able to add silver bars and coins to your collection.
Exchange-traded products (ETPs) include exchange-traded funds (ETFs), closed-end funds (CEFs) and exchange-traded notes (ETNs). Such instruments give investors exposure to the current gold price without storing physical bars. However, the complex structure of the aforementioned instruments as well as gold certificates, derivatives such as options and futures, all involve counterparty risks which should not be underestimated. People may also invest in mining companies, a highly speculative alternative to owning the physical metal itself.
Silver coins are no longer produced for circulation in the United States, but that doesn't mean it's impossible to find silver coins to buy. Bullion silver coins are available from sovereign mints around the world and a select few private mints contracted to work with foreign reserve banks. These coins range from annual-issue, investment-grade silver bullion coins to limited-edition proof silver coins. There's no shortage of variety when it comes to buying silver coins. You only have to decide which coins catch your eye and are worthy of your investment!
Many people choose to invest in a variety of precious gems and metals; this type of investing often includes silver coins. These coins can be an excellent opportunity for collectors, since there is a diverse selection available to anyone interested in collecting these coins. With this selection, you’ll be able to add silver bars and coins to your collection.
With 9 locations throughout the greater Dallas area, this is one of the region’s largest precious metal dealers. Dallas Gold & Silver Exchange buys all forms of gold, silver, and platinum. They also deal in rare coins and paper currency. Their inventory includes more than 250 bullion products such as the American Eagle, Canadian Maple Leaf, South African Krugerrand, Credit Suisse gold bars, kilo silver bars, and more. The stock of rare and collectible coins at Dallas Gold & Silver exchange includes PCGS and NGC certified coins, raw coins, proof and mint sets, and silver dollars. Many of their rarest coins can be viewed and purchased through their website.
South Africa introduced the Krugerrand in 1967 to cater to this market; this was the reason for its convenient and memorable gold content – exactly one troy ounce. It was the first modern, low-premium (i.e. priced only slightly above the bullion value of the gold) gold bullion coin. Bullion coins are also produced in fractions of an ounce – typically half ounce, quarter ounce, and one-tenth ounce. Bullion coins sometimes carry a face value as legal tender. The face value is minted on the coin, and it is done so in order to bestow legal tender status on a coin, which generally makes it easier to import or export across national borders, as well as subject to laws against counterfeiting. However, their real value is measured as dictated by their troy weight, the current market price of the precious metal contained, and the prevailing premium that market wishes to pay for those particular bullion coins. The face value is always significantly less than the bullion value of the coin. Legal tender bullion coins are a separate entity to bullion gold. One enjoys legal tender status, the latter is merely a raw commodity. Gold has an international currency code of XAU under ISO 4217. ISO 4217 includes codes not only for currencies, but also for precious metals (gold, silver, palladium and platinum; by definition expressed per one troy ounce.
Thus, even though some bars, coins, and rounds usually command lower premiums over spot, silver coins may warrant a much higher premium because of their collectible value. Also, another reason why coins command a higher premium is – they hold the prestige of being the only government-minted precious metals instruments and thus, enjoy a strong demand in the precious metals market.
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Some common coins are gold Eagles, Liberties, American Buffalo, South African Krugerrand, Austrian Philharmonics and Corona. They also have some truly rare coins like a 1907 High Relief Saint Gauden, listed at sixty-five thousand dollars and a 1848 Five dollar Half Eagle, listed for thirty-five grand. In addition Dallas Gold has a number of silver products including coins, rounds and bars.
In the early 1970s, one ounce of gold equaled $35. Let's say that at that time, you had a choice of either holding an ounce of gold or simply keeping the $35. They would both buy you the same things, like a brand new business suit or fancy bicycle. However, if you had an ounce of gold today and converted it for today's prices, it would still be enough to buy a brand new suit, but the same cannot be said for the $35. In short, you would have lost a substantial amount of your wealth if you decided to hold the $35 as opposed to the one ounce of gold because the value of gold has increased, while the value of a dollar has been eroded by inflation.
The name or series of a bar, round, or coin plays a significant role in the demand for the product. To retain the freedom to invest in or divest out of a particular instrument, as and when the investor wants, it is advisable to stick to famous product names and series like the American Silver Eagles or Canadian Maple Leafs. Hence, at any given time you will be assured of scores of both active buyers and sellers in the market.

Silver coins are no longer produced for circulation in the United States, but that doesn't mean it's impossible to find silver coins to buy. Bullion silver coins are available from sovereign mints around the world and a select few private mints contracted to work with foreign reserve banks. These coins range from annual-issue, investment-grade silver bullion coins to limited-edition proof silver coins. There's no shortage of variety when it comes to buying silver coins. You only have to decide which coins catch your eye and are worthy of your investment!

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