The gold that miners dig up goes into a number of different industries today. The largest by far is jewelry, which accounts for around 50% of gold demand. Another 40% comes from direct physical investment in gold, including gold used to create coins, bullion, medals, and gold bars. This broad demand category includes individuals, central banks, and, more recently, exchange-traded funds that purchase gold on behalf of others. The remaining demand for gold comes from industry, for use in things such as dentistry, heat shields, and tech gadgets. 
For most of history, coins were valued based on the precious metal they contain. Whether a coin was actually made by the party as claimed was of secondary importance compared to whether it contains the correct amount of metal – that is, correct weight and fineness (purity). Genuine appearance was simply a convenient shortcut to avoid time-consuming tests in everyday transactions.
Warren Buffett, the CEO of Berkshire Hathaway (tickere: BRK.A, BRK.B) and perhaps the greatest investor of all time, understands that fear. Gold investors, he says, are "right to be afraid of paper money. Their basic premise that paper money around the world is going to be worth less and less over time is absolutely correct. They have the correct basic premise. They should run from paper money."
While it is next to impossible to buy Silver at spot, reputable retailers such as APMEX make it easy to get the best price available at a competitive premium over spot. The term spot refers to the current market price for a 1 oz unit of Gold, a rate that continually fluctuates during the day. Investors want to pay as close to the current spot price as possible with small premiums giving the best chance at a good margin when selling later. There are, however, other factors that make a higher premium worth paying, such as a history of appreciation, availability, or reputation of quality from the mint of origin. While all Precious Metals including Gold are sold at a premium, this small additional cost is what pays for expenses such as mining, refining, production, and collectible market value.
Answer. Since, for one reason or another, it is difficult to take delivery from any of the ETFs, they are generally viewed as a price bet and not actual ownership of the metal. Most gold investors want possession of their gold because they are buying as a hedge against an economic, financial or political disaster. When disaster strikes, it does not do you much good to have your gold stored in some distant facility by a third party. For this reason, over the past couple of years the trend even with hedge fund operators has been away from the ETFs. In 2011, ETF sales plummeted while purchases of physical coins and bullion for delivery skyrocketed.
White says that American Eagle Bullion coins, one of the most popular coins for investing in gold, first make their way into the market when they are sold to the Mint’s “authorized purchasers.” (See the list below of the authorized purchasers and their prices, terms and conditions. If you’re new to buying gold, they are a great place to start.) Gold coins are also sold in commemorative editions directly to the public, but these are more expensive. The Mint marks up the price of the coins to cover the value of the gold and the actual minting, as well as shipping and other costs, White says. Dealers say that markup is about 3%. Then the authorized purchasers -- some of whom sell directly to the public and all of whom sell to other dealers -- add their own markup, as do the dealers who buy the coins.
With that said, it's worth noting that many silver bullion coin programs also have proof collectible options. These coins offer the same design as their bullion counterpart but deliver collectible value courtesy of a more visually brilliant design finish and lower, set mintage figures. The Proof American Silver Eagle Coin and the Proof Australian Silver Kangaroo are just two examples of silver bullion coin available in a collectible version as well.
Gold bullion coins come in several different sizes, providing a diverse selection. Investors of all levels can find value in Gold coins, as well as Gold bars and rounds. Whether you are buying bullion for an investment, adding to a collection, or simply hedging the market, what Gold you buy plays a major role within your portfolio, especially understanding the value of your purchase. Shop Gold bullion coins and rounds today.
Pricing for precious metal numismatic products (e.g., palladium, platinum, 24-k gold, 22-k gold) varies by the average cost of the underlying metal. We use our pricing range table the week prior to sale in order to determine the product's price. If the average weekly price of the precious metal moves up or down into another cost range, the price of the product will also go up or down, respectively, by a fixed amount. You’ll find detailed pricing instructions here. If you need the Adobe reader, you can get it from Adobe.
Storing gold bullion products can take up considerable space. As secure storage space is a limited resource, products must be chosen with care. Stackability of the products purchased will affect the amount/value you can store in a given area of the limited secure storage at your disposal.  Value per square inch is a critical metric when buying relatively large quantities of gold bullion. Bullion bars allow substantially more amounts of gold per square inch compared to all other investment vehicles. On the other hand, gold coins and rounds are unwieldy options as they require casings, tubes, or boxes when storing large numbers.
Gold coins minted pre-1933 come in a range of monetary values. Each of these coin values also has a number of varieties for each denomination, depending on which year it was produced. Gold pieces were coins that were produced in small denominations such as 1-dollar, 3 dollars, and 4 dollars. The eagle was another major variety that comes in four denominations: 20-dollar double eagle, 10-dollar eagle, 5-dollar half eagle, and 2.50-dollar quarter eagle.
Compare dealer prices. Aside from the proof version, the U.S. Mint doesn’t sell American Eagle gold coins directly. But there is a dealer location tool on the Mint’s website. Comparing prices among dealers is easy, too, because coins sell at a premium above gold’s spot price, or its delivery price as a commodity. You can find the spot price on precious metals exchange sites such as Monex.com or Kitco.com.
South African Krugerrands first came on the market in 1967. For several years, it was the only option available for Gold investors. The Gold Krugerrands are steeped in a rich history that is not only familiar to their country, but also to the world. Krugerrands remain a popular Gold coin with investors everywhere. The reverse depicts the Springbok antelope, the national animal of South Africa. The obverse shows the likeness of the first and only South African President Paul Kruger.

Many banks offer gold accounts where gold can be instantly bought or sold just like any foreign currency on a fractional reserve basis.[citation needed] Swiss banks offer similar service on a fully allocated basis. Pool accounts, such as those offered by some providers, facilitate highly liquid but unallocated claims on gold owned by the company. Digital gold currency systems operate like pool accounts and additionally allow the direct transfer of fungible gold between members of the service. Other operators, by contrast, allows clients to create a bailment on allocated (non-fungible) gold, which becomes the legal property of the buyer.
Answer. The biggest trap investors fall into is buying a gold investment that bears little or no relationship to his or her objectives. Take safe-haven investors for example. That group makes up 90% of our clientele, and probably a good 75% of the current physical gold market. Most often the safe-haven investor simply wants to add gold coins to his or her portfolio mix, but too often this same investor ends up instead with a leveraged (financed) gold position, or a handful of exotic rare coins, or a position in an ETF that amounts to little more than a bet on the gold price. These have little to do with safe-haven investing, and most investors would be well served to avoid them.
Buying Silver bars is one of the most cost effective, safest and easiest ways to own physical Silver. Silver bars are the bullion of choice for many investors because they cost less over Silver spot price than Silver coins. Additionally, their uniform shape and size mean Silver bars are easy to store, count and transfer. APMEX sells Silver bars produced by Sunshine Mint, PAMP Suisse, RCM, Johnson Matthey and other respected Silver mints. Each Silver bar is stamped with its exact Silver weight, fineness, and a serial number for added security.

Finally, you'll find as you shop our silver for sale that there are various silver bullion coin programs issued with beautiful finishes, unique weights, and low mintage figures. The designs in these issues are typically offered for a limited time and can feature as a few as one or two designs in a collection, or offer a robust number of different designs. The following are just a few examples of special issue silver bullion coins:

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