You may remember seeing these large gold bullion bars in movies such as "Three Kings," and the old James Bond movie "Goldfinger." Bars like these make up most of the world's gold bullion owned by governments and central banks. These are the "London good delivery" gold bullion bars of approximately 400 troy ounce size, refined and cast by the various private refiners worldwide, and accepted for 'delivery' into London and other major gold bullion markets.
Gold coins are produced at a mint by two dies that strike a blank piece of metal with great force. One die as the obverse (front) design for the coin and the other has the reverse (back) design. Proof coins are struck two times or more by the die, while bullion coins are struck once. Gold bullion coins usually have a fineness of .999, which is 24 karats.
Gold bars are often the least expensive form of bullion and are perfect for large purchases. They’re often easier to store and ship. 1-ounce coins are probably one of the most common and instantly recognized forms of gold. Coins allow investors to buy batches of gold in smaller increments (though there are also 1-ounce bars). Coins can sometimes be more convenient to liquidate, since you can sell off your gold savings one ounce at a time, rather than finding a buyer for a large bar of gold.
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Many coin and small bar dealers offer 'free' shipping when you buy online, but in reality that cost has been shifted into the price you pay for the coin or bar, along with the cost of its manufacture and the dealer's profit margin. In total, it is not unusual for all of these costs to result in you paying 5-8% over the actual wholesale price of the gold you buy.
The best places to get information for investing in gold bullion would be our “Investor Info” tab at the top of this page. There you will find more information about not just gold investing, but also investing in silver and palladium. You will also be able to subscribe to our Precious Metals Review (PMR) and our Gold Value Insights. Both of these subscriptions help to keep you informed on up-to-date information on the precious metals markets.
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Many Canadian Gold coins are struck in .9999 fine Gold, but the Royal Canadian Mint has a special selection of Gold coins struck in .99999 fine Gold. Many of these coins depict the iconic maple leaf, wildlife animals and predators, and stunning natural elements found in Canada. .99999 fine Gold is a worthy investment for any investor because these coins are extremely rare. 

Why sell bullion coins? At some point they will appreciate enough to represent a very attractive source of income. This can boost savings in gold accounts like a precious metals IRA, or offset an investment loss elsewhere. The trick to selling is to get a fair to good price. Trying to win a major sale of the year likely won’t happen, but good sales happen regularly. Research and watching spot market pricing of precious metals is the first step, and selling to reliable buyers is the second. Scottsdale Bullion and Coin, for example, will purchase gold bullion coins at very fair prices, making it a good source to sell gold and silver coins. It is possible to sell privately, but always make sure to get paid first before releasing a coin. And don’t trust credit card payments unless you are protected from chargebacks. Many scammers buy a coin and then claim to their credit card company it was never delivered. The charge gets reversed, and the seller is then out both the coin and the payment.
A. Once again the answer is not cut and dry, but a general rule of thumb is 10% to 30%. How high you go between 10% and 30% depends upon how concerned you are about the current economic, financial and political situation. James Rickards, strategic investment analyst and author of the New York Times bestseller, Currency Wars: The Making of the Next Global Crisis, advocates a 20% gold diversification. "Gold," explains Rickards, "is not a commodity. Gold is not an investment. Gold is money par excellence."

Lunar Series II: The Perth Mint’s most popular series in gold is the Lunar Series II collection. There is a new design each year in this program (2008-2019). Each new design coincides with the animal featured on the Zodiac for the Chinese Lunar Calendar, and these gold coins are available in weights ranging from 1/10 and 1/2 oz to 1 oz, 2 oz, and even 10 oz of pure gold.
Although governments have decided it's easier to be off the gold standard than on it, that doesn't change the central issue that backs gold's intrinsic value and safe-haven status: There's only so much gold in the world. The gold that's above ground being used in some fashion is estimated to be around 190,000 metric tons. The amount of gold in the ground that can be economically mined today is notably less, at roughly 54,000 metric tons.    
Bullion coins sell for a premium over the market price of the metal on the commodities exchanges.[9] Reasons include their comparative small size and the costs associated with manufacture, storage and distribution. The amount of the premium varies depending on the coin's type and weight and the precious metal. The premium also is affected by prevailing demand.
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