Gold mining stocks have their benefits and their drawbacks, and aren't the purest way to own gold. If you choose to take this route, you'll want to pay close attention to a company's mining costs, existing mine portfolio, and expansion opportunities at both existing and new assets. All of these will play a role in determining what an investor is willing to pay for a gold miner's stock (in addition to the spot price of the metal itself, of course).
The best place to buy Silver is from a reputable dealer with a long history and strong reputation. Established retailers have a long-standing relationship with buyers, sellers, and government mints around the world. These ongoing partnerships serve as reassurance that your purchase has been through a network the relies on transparency and high standards of authentication. While you can buy Silver bars, rounds and coins from many different places, the ease of making a purchase and the security of the transaction are paramount. APMEX offers more than 6,000 beautifully designed products, backed by a quality guarantee. Our prices for Silver are affordable for most investors, and allow you to add tangible assets to your portfolio.
If you are buying gold coins in the U.S., chances are good that you will see American Gold Eagle coins for sale. These gold coins are produced by the U.S. Mint, and are one of the world’s most popular gold bullion coins. One of the nicest things about American Gold Eagle coins is that they are available in numerous weights such as 1/10th ounce, ¼ ounce, ½ ounce and 1 ounce.

United States Gold Bureau is a private distributor of Gold, Silver & Platinum coins from the U.S. Mint and is not affiliated with the U.S. Government. Information on this web site is intended for educational purpose only and is not to be used as investment advice or a recommendation to buy sell or trade any asset that requires a licensed broker. As with all investments there is risk and the past performance of a particular asset class does not guarantee any future performance. The United States Gold Bureau, principals and representatives do not guarantee to clients that they will realize a profit or guarantee that losses may not be incurred as a result of following its coin collecting recommendations, or upon liquidation of coins bought from the U.S. Gold Bureau. All content and images are owned by USGB and may not be reproduced without written authorization.

British Silver Britannia: The official silver bullion coin of Great Britain, the Britannia coinage debuted in 1997 from the Royal Mint of England. It shares the same obverse and reverse designs as the Gold Britannia. On the obverse is a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II, while the reverse features the design of Britannia from Philip Nathan. From 1997 to 2012, the Silver Britannia featured .958 silver purity, but since 2013 it has featured .999 pure silver content.
Gold was used in commerce (beside other precious metals) in the Ancient Near East since the Bronze Age, but coins proper originated much later, during the 6th century BC, in Anatolia. The name of king Croesus of Lydia remains associated with the invention (although the Parian Chronicle mentions Pheidon of Argos as a contender). In 546 BC, Croesus was captured by the Persians, who adopted gold as the main metal for their coins. The most valuable of all Persian minted coinage still remains the gold drahms, minted in 1 AD as a gift by the Persian King Vonones Hebrew Bible new testament (Matthew 2.1–23).[1][2] Ancient Greek coinage contained a number of gold coins issued by the various city states.
Most of the countries worldwide switched from the gold standard by 1933 due to central bankers’ attempts to accelerate inflation and money printing during Great Depression. As a result, most mints around the world stopped making gold coins as a circulating currency. In the U.S. in 1933, the Executive Order 6102 forbade the “hoarding” of gold. This was followed by a devaluation of the dollar relative to gold. By 1971, the U.S. completely detached the dollar from the value of gold. Consider the rare 1933 $30 Double Eagle sold in 2002 at Sotheby's for $7,590,020, making it the most valuable coin sold to date. American gold coins minted prior to 1933 are not collectible (and can therefore be obtained near their actual melt value), but they are a wonderful way to buy a piece of American history. Plus, these pre-1933 gold coins are a solid investment without paying a collector's premium. if you would prefer silver, old silver coins for sale are very similiar to these pre-1933 gold coins.
Gold certificates. Gold certificates are another option for "owning" gold that is best placed in the bullion category but merits a little explanation. Gold certificates are notes issued by a company that owns gold. Effectively, the note provides the buyer with direct exposure to the metal, but it doesn't require the physical ownership of the metal, which the note issuer keeps safely under lock and key.
Precious metal prices can be volatile and the value of your metal may go down as well as up. No responsibility can be accepted by Jewellery Quarter Bullion Limited for any loss caused by acting on information we have provided. We do not offer investment or tax advice and recommend that you conduct your own independent research before making any investment decisions.

Answer. Many of our clients own gold stocks and we believe they have a place in the portfolio. However, it should be emphasized that gold stocks are not a substitute for real gold ownership, that is, in its physical form as coins and bars. Instead, stocks should be viewed as an addition to the portfolio after one has truly diversified with gold coins and bullion. Gold stocks can actually act opposite the intent of the investor, as some justifiably disgruntled mine company shareholders learned in the recent past when their stocks failed to perform as the price rose. There is no such ambiguity involved in actual ownership of gold coins and bullion. When gold rises, they rise with it.

Bullion coins sell for a premium over the market price of the metal on the commodities exchanges.[9] Reasons include their comparative small size and the costs associated with manufacture, storage and distribution. The amount of the premium varies depending on the coin's type and weight and the precious metal. The premium also is affected by prevailing demand.

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