A gold coin is made predominantly of gold. Bullion coins are used for investment purposes. Other gold coins for sale are meant to be sold to collectors. Bullion coins are valued based on the gold content while collectible coins may have numismatic value.  (However, be careful, as many items sold as rare or collectible are worth no more than their actual melt value.)

With 9 locations throughout the greater Dallas area, this is one of the region’s largest precious metal dealers. Dallas Gold & Silver Exchange buys all forms of gold, silver, and platinum. They also deal in rare coins and paper currency. Their inventory includes more than 250 bullion products such as the American Eagle, Canadian Maple Leaf, South African Krugerrand, Credit Suisse gold bars, kilo silver bars, and more. The stock of rare and collectible coins at Dallas Gold & Silver exchange includes PCGS and NGC certified coins, raw coins, proof and mint sets, and silver dollars. Many of their rarest coins can be viewed and purchased through their website.


Investors should be wary of dealers who encourage them to purchase pre 1933 us gold coins that are priced well above their actual melt value.  Many of these coins are not the least bit rare, even if they have a spiffy plastic case with a grade and a hologram on it. Unless you have money to blow, do not pay more than a few percent over the melt value of a coin unless you are highly knowledgeable about rare coins.  Collecting coins can be a fun hobby, but the field is filled with rip-off artists and inflated prices.
Following the advent of gold as money, its importance continued to grow throughout Europe and the U.K., with relics from the Greek and Roman empires prominently displayed in museums around the world, and Great Britain developing its own metals-based currency in 1066. The British pound (symbolizing a pound of sterling silver), shillings and pence were all based on the amount of gold (or silver) that it represented. Eventually, gold symbolized wealth throughout Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas.
Over the years, Gold price history has shown that the global economic climate primarily determines the value. When the largest economies in the world, including the United States, are experiencing growth, demand for Gold goes down as investors are more willing to try riskier options such as the stock market. When leading countries suffer a recession, the demand for Gold goes back up due to its historic role as a safe haven investment. As seen many times in the history of Gold, prices will once again go up. This relationship between historical rates and the current value of Gold has been viewed many times over the years and is a central determining factor used by market analysts.
The Gold price forecast is determined differently than most other investments. Stocks and commodities are evaluated as news about each company is released, or when cost changes occur in the manufacturing supply chain. Gold, however, has inherent value, which is not affected by turnovers in upper management or fuel costs. Economists use many factors when predicting Gold prices, including global inflation rates, trade imbalances between the United States and other countries, and the holdings of major central banks around the world. Expectations about higher interest rates and inflation have an impact on the Gold price forecast, as well. Supply and availability can impact some estimates, although when demand increases, many sellers become eager to recycle their existing supply.
DGSE.com allows customers of Dallas Gold and Silver the opportunity to view what products are currently available for purchase, physically make those purchases and have them delivered. The website also offers an up to date ticker of market precious metal prices. Customers can be up to the minute aware of what gold, silver and other precious metals are worth.
In reality, you have borrowed money – as much as 80 percent of the purchase price of the metal – from a financial institution that claims it will hold the metal for you, and charge you monthly storage fees and interest charges. Rather than sending you a bill for those fees, the institution will reduce your equity in the investment. Once your equity falls below a certain level (for example, 15 percent of the purchase price), the financial institution will issue an "equity call," requiring you to pay additional money to bring your equity above the equity call level. If you can't pay or refuse to pay additional money, the lender will sell the metal to pay off your loan and send you a bill if the sale of the metal does not cover the amount you owe.
When you pair assets that move differently from each other, you create a more diversified portfolio. This is why mixing bonds with stocks is the foundation of so many portfolios. Bonds have a negative correlation with stocks, meaning they tend to go up when stocks are going down, and vice versa. Here's the interesting thing: Gold's correlation with bonds over the past decade or so is roughly 0.25, still very low. So gold doesn't track along with stocks, and it doesn't track along with bonds, either. Adding a small amount of gold to a stock and bond portfolio -- probably no more than 10% -- can help increase diversification and the ultimate safety of the entire portfolio.

Purchase gold coins online as well as silver coins with Golden Eagle. We offer gold coins & gold bars with competitive prices. It is simple to buy gold with Golden Eagle Coins. We specialize in a wide variety of gold bullion coins and other gold bullion products. Our large inventory caters to both the gold bullion investor as well as the collector.


"The rich old speculator Bernard M. Baruch forehandedly bought gold and gold shares after the 1929 Crash. Years later a suspicious Treasury Secretary asked him why. Because, Baruch replied, he was 'commencing to have doubts about the currency.' Many are beginning to doubt the strength of the dollar as they well might. Following Baruch's example, they should lay in some gold as a hedge."
At the end of the day, if you choose to get your gold exposure by owning mining shares, it might be best to buy a mutual fund that focuses on precious metals companies like the aptly named Midas Fund or an ETF like Van Eck Vectors Gold Miners ETF (NYSEMKT:GDX). Note, however, that mutual funds and ETFs like these usually have broadly diversified portfolios that will result in exposure beyond just gold miners. That's not inherently bad, but it does change the dynamics of the investment a little bit.   
Instead of buying gold itself, investors can buy the companies that produce the gold as shares in gold mining companies. If the gold price rises, the profits of the gold mining company could be expected to rise and the worth of the company will rise and presumably the share price will also rise. However, there are many factors to take into account and it is not always the case that a share price will rise when the gold price increases. Mines are commercial enterprises and subject to problems such as flooding, subsidence and structural failure, as well as mismanagement, negative publicity, nationalization, theft and corruption. Such factors can lower the share prices of mining companies.

Good delivery bars that are held within the London bullion market (LBMA) system each have a verifiable chain of custody, beginning with the refiner and assayer, and continuing through storage in LBMA recognized vaults. Bars within the LBMA system can be bought and sold easily. If a bar is removed from the vaults and stored outside of the chain of integrity, for example stored at home or in a private vault, it will have to be re-assayed before it can be returned to the LBMA chain. This process is described under the LBMA's "Good Delivery Rules".[39]

Answer. Since, for one reason or another, it is difficult to take delivery from any of the ETFs, they are generally viewed as a price bet and not actual ownership of the metal. Most gold investors want possession of their gold because they are buying as a hedge against an economic, financial or political disaster. When disaster strikes, it does not do you much good to have your gold stored in some distant facility by a third party. For this reason, over the past couple of years the trend even with hedge fund operators has been away from the ETFs. In 2011, ETF sales plummeted while purchases of physical coins and bullion for delivery skyrocketed.


In the early 1970s, one ounce of gold equaled $35. Let's say that at that time, you had a choice of either holding an ounce of gold or simply keeping the $35. They would both buy you the same things, like a brand new business suit or fancy bicycle. However, if you had an ounce of gold today and converted it for today's prices, it would still be enough to buy a brand new suit, but the same cannot be said for the $35. In short, you would have lost a substantial amount of your wealth if you decided to hold the $35 as opposed to the one ounce of gold because the value of gold has increased, while the value of a dollar has been eroded by inflation.
For people who want to ‘play the market,’ i.e. buy and sell regularly to earn immediate profits on every transaction, it is essential to invest in products that can be moved quickly. Even though this is a well-known strategy, timing the market is harder than it seems. For investors who want to buy and sell at a moment’s notice, portability plays an important role in their product choices. However, a healthy risk appetite is required for playing the market. These investors mostly prefer smaller, more portable gold investment vehicles such as coins and rounds.
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